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#23603 - 08/28/06 09:51 PM Re: The gene He?
Coop Slave Offline
Chicken

Registered: 08/14/06
Posts: 127
Loc: Australia
I have a speckled sussex with this trait as well. Very interesting!

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#23604 - 08/28/06 11:51 PM Re: The gene He?
Pekin Nut Offline
Chicken

Registered: 12/04/03
Posts: 142
Loc: South Africa
I have seen this on cocks only as well and not on hens.

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#23605 - 08/29/06 11:45 PM Re: The gene He?
KazJaps Offline
Classroom Professor

Registered: 08/30/02
Posts: 2805
Loc: Australia
Comb Modifiers:

There are two "Rough/Smooth" comb alleles listed in "Poultry Breeding & Genetics", that modify comb texture (especially noticable in rosecombs), eg:
  • He+ -Rough(also produces more spikes in single comb) &
  • he1 -Smooth

* notice the first is considered the wild type.

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#23606 - 08/30/06 05:19 PM Re: The gene He?
KazJaps Offline
Classroom Professor

Registered: 08/30/02
Posts: 2805
Loc: Australia
I've modified the above post, after re-reading the section on the topic (in Poultry Breeding & Genetics- pages: 192-193). The author is quoting from the Cavalie and Mérat's study, 1965. Unfortunately the text isn't clear, eg why is the mutation he^l with a superscript? Is there more than one mutation on the locus?

There was no chromosome linkage mentioned of he locus, only that it is autosomal.

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#100083 - 11/14/11 12:44 PM Re: The gene He? [Re: KazJaps]
Redcap Offline
Ruler of the Roost

Registered: 08/14/06
Posts: 954
Loc: Germany
There are some studies (with english abstracts) to this topic of Cavalie & Merat
http://rnd.edpsciences.org/index.php?opt...amp;from=module
Let me know, if downloads doesn't work for You.
_________________________

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#100084 - 11/14/11 04:04 PM Re: The gene He? [Re: Redcap]
Wieslaw Offline
Moderator
Classroom Professor

Registered: 09/18/09
Posts: 3768
Loc: Denmark
I'm rather surprised reading this thread, because I always considered the rough comb type as being normal, it is just that the photo on page 1 shows the roughness enhanced in some way.The birds must have some kind of modifier to make the 'bumps' bigger. I had a bird or two with smooth combs, and they were really UGLY, kind of shiny and unhealthy look to it.

This is how normal rough comb looks like:



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#100097 - 11/14/11 11:45 PM Re: The gene He? [Re: Wieslaw]
Redcap Offline
Ruler of the Roost

Registered: 08/14/06
Posts: 954
Loc: Germany
I thought, I post the abstracts of all studies regarding rose comb genetics from Cavalie & Mérat.
Quote:
SÉGRÉGATION ANORMALE POUR LES ALLÈLES " CRÊTE SIMPLE " ET " CRÊTE EN ROSE " CHEZ LA POULE. I — CROISEMENT ♂ Rr × ♀ rr
Ph. Merat
Ann. Biol. anim. Bioch. Biophys. 2 2 (1962) 109-117
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/rnd:19620201

ABNORMAL SEGREGATION FOR THE ALLELES « SINGLE COMB » AND « ROSE COMB » IN THE FOWL.
A number of pedigree matings of the type ♂ Rr (rose comb) X ♀ rr (single comb), totalling about 5 000 progeny, were made from 1954 to 1961. The pooled data show that a deviated segregation arose in the male progeny of these matings : Rose comb males were less numerous, and single comb males more numerous, than the expectation (cf table 1). The departure from the « normal » proportion was highly significant (P # 1.5 X 10 ^ -5 (cf table 2) Among the females, the segregation was always normal, and homogenous between years and families. With respect to the deviation from normal proportions, the different sires used are significantly heterogeneous. On the contrary, no difference between dams appears from that point of view.
Fertility and hatchability in families having a deviated segregation ratio appear to be normal,either in absolute value, or compared with « normal n families from the same origin (table 5), and there seem to be no abnormal mortality among ♂ Rr males from the 18th day of incubation onwards (table 4).
On the other hand, the secondary, or tertiary sex-ratio was studied in these matings. Families with an « abnormal » segregation ratio do not differ from « normal » families of the same origin for the sex-ratio of all progeny (rose and single combs together); conversely, there are less males than expected among rose-comb progeny, and very significantly more among single-comb progeny, on the basis of the sex-ratio of « normal » families from the same origin, in the same years (table 3).
Endly, a progeny-test on 29 single-comb cocks members of the families with « abnormal » segregation ratio shows that all are, in fact, of the genotype rr.
These facts considered together lead to reject the hypotheses, either of a greater embryonic mortality of the rose-comb males, or of sex-determination abnormalities, or of modifying genes suppressing the rose-comb phenotype in some of the ♂ Rr males. A more complete discussion will be presented later.


Quote:
SÉGRÉGATIONS ANORMALES POUR LES ALLÈLES « CRÊTE SIMPLE » ET « CRÊTE EN ROSE » CHEZ LA POULE. II. — CROISEMENT ♂ rr × ♀ Rr
Ph. MÉrat
Ann. Biol. anim. Bioch. Biophys. 3 1 (1963) 59-64
DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/rnd:19630104

ABNORMAL SEGREGATION FOR THE ALLELES « SINGLE COMB » AND « ROSE COMB » IN THE FOWL. II
Pedigree matings, and some semi-pedigree matings (mother alone identified) of the type ♂ rr (single comb) X ♀ Rr (rose comb), with a total of about 15000 progeny, show, on the whole, a significant heterogeneity between full-sib families (at the I per cent level) for the segregation ratio of the 2 types of combs : The proportion is normal, near 1/1 for the total of the data (Table 1), but there are more than expected of full-sib families with an excess, either of single comb, or of rose comb, hatched chicks. On the contrary, there is no significant heterogeneity between half-sib families (cf. table 2).
Fertility and hatchability are normal, and show no apparent correlation with the segregation ratio (either near or far from equality) for comb-type (cf. table 3).
On the other hand, a comparison of mendelian proportions for the various types of matings with respect to the gene R does not support the hypothesis of modifying genes present in some families.
These results suggest some variations of the segregation ratio of the alleles R and r at meiosis of the female sex.


Quote:
SÉGRÉGATIONS ANORMALES POUR LES ALLÈLES « CRÊTE SIMPLE » ET « CRÊTE EN ROSE » CHEZ LA POULE. III. — CROISEMENT ♂ Rr × ♀ Rr
Ph. MÉrat
Ann. Biol. anim. Bioch. Biophys. 3 2 (1963) 125-131
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/rnd:19630204

ABNORMAL SEGREGATION FOR THE ALLELES « SINGLE COMB » AND « ROSE COMB » IN THE FOWL. III
Pedigree matings of the type ♂ Rr (rose comb ) X ♀ Rr, giving about 8000 progeny hatched, were made between 1951 and 1960. The pooled data show that single-comb female progeny are in excess over the expected proportion of one quarter; this excess is highly significant (P < 0.001) on the total. In the male progeny, there is also, on the whole, a deviation from the expected proportion (3/1) but in the opposite sense, and also highly significant (P < 0.001) (cf. tables 1, 2).
There are probably differences between sires intra-flocks (table 3) for the segregation ratio among the females.
There are together an excess of males (over the 1/1 proportion) among the rose comb progeny, and an excess of females among single comb progeny, these two deviations being highly significant (P < 0.001) (cf. tables 4 and 5).
Hatching percentages (hatched chicks/incubated eggs) are normal and of the same order as the remaining of the flock, incubated at the same time.
A comparison with the observed segregation ratios in the progeny of matings of the type ♂ Rr X ♀ rr
and ♂ rr X ♀ Rr, the sex-ratio observed in matings ♂ RR X ♀ RR, and, accessorily, the hatching results, do not support the hypotheses, either of an embryonic mortality differing with the various types of zygotes, or of a different fertility for the possible types of ova, or of genes modifying the phenotypic effect of the alleles R and r, or of sex-determination abnormalities.
We are thus conducted to conclude in favour of a deviation of the segregation ratio occurring at meiosis, or of a preferential fertilisation. A fuller discussion will be given separately.


Quote:
SÉGRÉGATIONS ANORMALES POUR LES ALLÈLES « CRÊTE SIMPLE » ET « CRÊTE EN ROSE » CHEZ LA POULE. IV. — DISCUSSION D'ENSEMBLE RELATIVE AUX TROIS TYPES DE CROISEMENTS Rr × rr, rr × Rr ET Rr × Rr
Ph. MÉrat
Ann. Biol. anim. Bioch. Biophys. 3 2 (1963) 133-141
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/rnd:19630205

ABNORMAL SEGREGATION FOR THE ALLELES « SINGLE COMB »
AND « ROSE COMB » IN THE FOWL. IV
In three previous papers (MÉRAT 1962, 1963 a, b) we described abnormal segregations appeared at the R locus (Rose comb-single comb) in fowls. The facts are related to the three mating types ♂ Rr X ♀ rr, ♂ rr X ♀ Rr and ♂ Rr X ♀ Rr.
A general discussion presented here for these three mating types leads to conclude, for the first and probably the third type, to the presence of a selective fertilization of a particular type, attributable to the interaction between 2 loci or chromosomal regions.


Quote:
« EFFET MATERNEL » LIÉ AU GÈNE R DE FORME DE LA CRÊTE, SUR LA CROISSANCE DES JEUNES CHEZ LA POULE DOMESTIQUE
P. MÉrat and L. Durand
Ann. Biol. anim. Bioch. Biophys. 5 2 (1965) 321-324
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/rnd:19650212

« A MATERNAL EFFECT » ON CHICK WEIGHT
ASSOCIATED WITH THE ROSE-COMB GENE IN THE DOMESTIC FOWL
Reciprocal crosses of the types ♂ Rr X ♀ rr and ♂ rr X ♀ Rr were compared for 8-week weight, the -sires and dams in both being issued from the same segregating strain. A highly significant difference, amounting to about 50 grams for males and 30 grams for females, was found between the two - crosses. It suggests a maternal effect associated with the genotype at the R locus.


Quote:
DIFFÉRENCE DE CROISSANCE LIÉE AU GÊNE « R » CHEZ LES COQS
P. MÉrat and L. Durand
Ann. Biol. anim. Bioch. Biophys. 5 3 (1965) 399-401
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/rnd:19650307

GROWTH DIFFERENCE FOR MALE CHICKS, ASSOCIATED WITH THE « R » GENE
In a segregating strain, chicks heterozygous for rose comb (Rr) were compared with recessive ones (rr) for 8 - week weight. The comparison was restricted to pairs of full sibs of the same hatch.
Single comb males were significantly heavier than rose comb ones. For females, the difference was not significant.


Quote:
UN NOUVEAU GÈNE, MODIFICATEUR DE LA FORME DES CRÊTES EN ROSE, ET SON INCIDENCE POSSIBLE SUR LA FERTILITÉ DES COQS
A. Cavalie and P. MÉrat
Ann. Biol. anim. Bioch. Biophys. 5 4 (1965) 451-468
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/rnd:19650403

A NEW GENE, MODIFYING THE FORM OF ROSE COMBS,
AND ITS POSSIBLE ASSOCIATION WITH COCK FERTILITY
A new comb-type gene is identified in a pedigree population whose origin is a cross between Leghorns, Rhode-Island Reds and Wyandottes. The effect of this gene is apparent in rose-comb birds.
It has two alleles, which we called He+ (« herisse » = rugged) and Hel (« lisse » = smooth). The first one is dominant. In day-old chicks, it gives a granular appearance to rose-combs. On the contrary, these rose-combs have a smooth surface in birds homozygous for the second allele (fig. 1). In adults, the He+ gene causes the comb to be more bulky, with more numerous and higher spikes than He1 (fig. 2). The difference between the two phenotypes is more evident in day-old chicks than in adult birds.


Quote:
LIAISON ENTRE LE NOMBRE DE CRÊTILLONS DES POULES A CRÊTE SIMPLE ET LA PRÉSENCE DU GÈNE « HÉRISSÉ/LISSE », MODIFICATEUR DES CRÊTES EN ROSE
A. Cavalie and P. MÉrat
Ann. Biol. anim. Bioch. Biophys. 7 2 (1967) 205-207
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/rnd:19670208

RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE NUMBER OF SPIKELETS OF SINGLE-COMBS AND THE PRESENCE OF « HÉRISSÉ/LISSE » A GENE MODIFYING ROSE-COMBS IN THE DOMESTIC FOWL
A previously discovered gene, determining a difference in the appearance of rose-combs, especially in one day-old chicks (Allele He+ « rugged », dominant over He1, « smooth ») was found to influence the number of spikes [points] found on single-combs. On the average, homozygous « smooth » birds have less spikes [usually 4 or 5 points] than « rugged » ones [up to 8 points].


Edited by Henk69 (11/15/11 01:20 AM)
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#100155 - 11/17/11 03:50 PM Re: The gene He? [Re: Redcap]
Wieslaw Offline
Moderator
Classroom Professor

Registered: 09/18/09
Posts: 3768
Loc: Denmark
I have a comment to the last quote. I had cockerels with up to 11(eleven) well formed spikes, especially on birds where the blade goes up into the sky. Can anybody beat that?

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