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#10659 - 07/28/02 05:45 AM Re: Coryza Outbreak
Anonymous
Unregistered


Thanks, I appreciate your help. I can not see my vet until monday morning, he charges very high for after hours calls. this infection is a complete surprise, I have had a small flock for several years and have no idea where this came from, am very up set about all this.
Regards
Don

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#10660 - 07/29/02 06:56 AM Re: Coryza Outbreak
Big Boy Offline
Ruler of the Roost

Registered: 07/17/02
Posts: 845
Loc: Kansas
Anny is absolutely correct about eating eggs from medicated fowl. I had thought that you were referring to eggs coming from fowl with Coryza not that you were referring to eggs from fowl on medication. Again, good luck today.

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#10661 - 07/29/02 08:02 AM Re: Coryza Outbreak
Anny Offline
Coop Keeper

Registered: 07/16/02
Posts: 503
Loc: Belgium
Well, I dicussed the matter with my vet (I invited them for a BBQ at noon and he and his wife left at 1:15 in the morning!! 13 hours visit! eek )
He says there will be very little of the medication in the eggs as most of it will be expelled in the droppings. However HE would not eat the eggs during medication or within 10 days after stopping medication unless he were starving.
There should be no human health risk with Coryza. He could not give any other answers without doing some research.
Hope this helps. Anny

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#10662 - 07/29/02 09:45 AM Re: Coryza Outbreak
Anonymous
Unregistered


Don,
If your experience goes anything like mine has, the decision to eat eggs from medicated hens won't be much of an issue. Our egg laying completely stopped within a week of the first symptoms. Literature says 5-70% drop but several of mine were already molting so production was really low.
Do you have any idea how Coryza could have been introduced into your flock? Mine came in the most common way, by introducing new birds that turned out to be carriers and even one or two that were probably already sick when I got them.
After a few weeks of Sulfa drugs and still watching them suffering tremendously and losing nine from the sickness compounded by the heat, we decided to put the rest down and start over. They were just really suffering, although some were coming around. Fortunately, I did have 4 chicks up at the house that were never exposed to the flock, so they will move down to the henhouse after the decontamination period is over.
The big thing to remember is even though they might recover, they will always be carriers and will likely infect any new birds you bring in, plus there is a strong likliehood of periodic outbreaks later on too. That is why I decided to go ahead and wipe out this flock so I could have confidence that I had healthy clean birds that wouldn't be susceptible to illness and suffering, and even though the illness isn't a threat to humans, my family feels a lot better about eating eggs from healthy birds.
I thoroughly cleaned out the coop then used a weed sprayer and wet down everything with a disinfectant and am now waiting 2-3 weeks before allowing any more birds down there.
Hope things go well for you in treating your birds.

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#10663 - 07/29/02 10:11 AM Re: Coryza Outbreak
Big Boy Offline
Ruler of the Roost

Registered: 07/17/02
Posts: 845
Loc: Kansas
Jeff, I feel sorry for you. That was a tough decision but I think (and hope) that it will prove the right one. That is how I got Coryza: bringing in birds that were sick but had no symptoms and putting them right into the flock and not first placing them into quarantine for a week or two. The smell associated with Coryza reminds me of really bad strep throat in humans: rancid, rotting flesh on a dry, old carcass. Once you smell it you will never forget it.

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#10664 - 07/29/02 12:12 PM Re: Coryza Outbreak
Anny Offline
Coop Keeper

Registered: 07/16/02
Posts: 503
Loc: Belgium
Yes, Jeff, I feel sorry too and I wish you the best of luck with your new flock. Anny.

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#10665 - 07/30/02 12:53 PM Re: Coryza Outbreak
Anonymous
Unregistered


Thanks for the kind thoughts.
We have really switched gears at our place and spending lots of time with the four chicks that weren't down at the when the infected birds moved in.
Our chicks are 4 weeks old now, all four are different breeds and we are letting them spend the days outdoors in the shade under the cover of a dog crate with the bottom removed so they are having a good time scratching and enjoying the outdoors.
Hopefully these girls will thrive and supply us with eggs for our family over the winter, then in March we will start over with day old chicks and get the flock back up to 25 or 30 again and make sure we get at least one or two roosters to let us know who's in charge.
Also have baby rabbits due this week so moving on to enjoying farm LIFE for a change.
Thanks again.

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