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#114625 - 07/23/15 04:57 PM Re: Journal papers online - reference list [Re: KazJaps]
KazJaps Offline
Classroom Professor

Registered: 08/30/02
Posts: 2792
Loc: Australia
Just updating this list (posted recently in other threads)...

New 2015 paper on Duplex comb:

A Genomic Duplication is Associated with Ectopic Eomesodermin Expression in the Embryonic Chicken Comb and Two Duplex-comb Phenotypes
Ben Dorshorst, Mohammad Harun-Or-Rashid, Alireza Jian Bagherpoor, Carl-Johan Rubin, Chris Ashwell, David Gourichon, Michèle Tixier-Boichard, Finn Hallböök, Leif Andersson
PLoS Genet. 2015 March; 11(3): e1004947. Published online 2015 March 19. doi: 10.1371/journal.pgen.1004947
Full Paper

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Another paper on chicken combs:

Morphological Mutations: Lessons from the Cockscomb
by Denis Headon
PLoS Genet. 2015 Mar; 11(3): e1004979.
Full Paper

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Another 2015 research paper on Pea combs:

Quantitative Effect of a CNV on a Morphological Trait in Chickens.
Moro et al.
PLoS One. 2015; 10(3): e0118706.
Full Paper

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The identification of loci for polydactyly in chickens using a genome-wide association study.
Sheng X, Chen Y, Jia Y, Qi X, Feng Y, Huang Z, Guo Y.
Gene. 2015 Sep 1;568(2):176-80. doi: 10.1016/j.gene.2015.05.049. Epub 2015 May 21.
Abstract

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#114626 - 07/23/15 08:41 PM Re: Journal papers online - reference list [Re: KazJaps]
KazJaps Offline
Classroom Professor

Registered: 08/30/02
Posts: 2792
Loc: Australia
Other 2015 papers:

Molecular phylogenetic analysis of Chinese indigenous blue-shelled chickens inferred from whole genomic region of the SLCO1B3 gene.
Dalirsefat SB, Dong X, Deng X.
Poult Sci. 2015 Aug 1;94(8):1776-1786. Epub 2015 Jun 11.
Full Paper

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Mort, R. L., Jackson, I. J., & Patton, E. E. (2015). The melanocyte lineage in development and disease. Development (Cambridge, England), 142(4), 620–632. doi:10.1242/dev.106567
Full Paper

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Abebe, A. S., Mikko, S., & Johansson, A. M. (2015). Genetic Diversity of Five Local Swedish Chicken Breeds Detected by Microsatellite Markers. PLoS ONE, 10(4), e0120580. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0120580
Full Paper

Johansson, A. M., & Nelson, R. M. (2015). Characterization of genetic diversity and gene mapping in two Swedish local chicken breeds. Frontiers in Genetics, 6, 44. doi:10.3389/fgene.2015.00044
Full Paper

*Note - in the last Swedish study they researched Swedish local chicken breeds Bohuslän-Dals svarthöna (with black plumage) and Hedemorahöna. Both breed populations have Fm segregating, the same Fm sequence as in Silkies (less Fm individuals found in the Hedemorahöna). Fm is on Chromosome 20, & Fm was correlated to the darkest combs, fm+ to red comb. But they also found comb colour variation due to modifier(s) on Chromosome 21 (this not E locus - Chr. 11, nor mo Chr. 4, etc).

They cite the following 2013 paper (good on leg colour genetics):
Siwek, M., Wragg, D., Slawinska, A., Malek, M., Hanotte, O., & Mwacharo, J. (2013). Insights into the genetic history of Green-legged Partridgelike fowl: mtDNA and genome-wide SNP analysis. Animal Genetics, 44(5), 522–532. doi:10.1111/age.12046
Full Paper


Plus they cite the following 2014 paper, full version now available online:

A genome-wide association study identifies novel single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with dermal shank pigmentation in chickens.
Li G, Li D, Yang N, Qu L, Hou Z, Zheng J, Xu G, Chen S.
Poult Sci. 2014 Dec;93(12):2983-7. doi: 10.3382/ps.2014-04164. Epub 2014 Sep 26.
Full Paper

The following another 2014 paper on Swedish chickens:

Englund, T., Strömstedt, L. and Johansson, A. M. (2014), Relatedness and diversity of nine Swedish local chicken breeds as indicated by the mtDNA D-loop. Hereditas, 151: 229–233. doi: 10.1111/hrd2.00064
Full Paper

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#114648 - 07/28/15 09:35 PM Re: Journal papers online - reference list [Re: KazJaps]
KazJaps Offline
Classroom Professor

Registered: 08/30/02
Posts: 2792
Loc: Australia
Punnett's 1923 book "Heredity in Poultry" (with colour plates):
Download page

The link is of an online page viewer but on the bottom left is a download button where you can select to download the whole pdf.

-------------------------------

Eggshell colour genetics:

Inheritance of Tinted Eggshell Colors in White-Shell Stocks
R. WEI, J. J. BITGOOD, and M. R. DENTINE
Poultry Science (1992) 71 (3): 406-418 doi:10.3382/ps.0710406
Full Paper

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The Effect of a Protoporphyrin Mutant on Some Economic Traits of the Chicken
R. N. SHOFFNER, R. SHUMAN, J. S. OTIS, J. J. BITGOOD, V. GARWOOD, and P. LOWE
Poultry Science (1982) 61 (5): 817-820 doi:10.3382/ps.0610817
Full Paper
---------------------------------

Genetic Studies in Poultry. II. Inheritance of Egg-Colour and Broodiness.
R.C. Punnett and Major P.G. Bailey
Journal of Genetics. Vol. 10, No. 4. 277-292. (December, 1920)
full paper

*posted previously
------------------

Egg Shell Color in Crosses Between White- and Brown-Egg Breeds
G. O. Hall
Poultry Science (1944) 23 (4): 259-265 doi:10.3382/ps.0230259
Full Paper


Edited by KazJaps (07/28/15 10:00 PM)
Edit Reason: added pr paper

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#114651 - 07/29/15 07:01 PM Re: Journal papers online - reference list [Re: KazJaps]
Robbie Online   content
Flock Leader

Registered: 01/19/15
Posts: 258
Loc: Ontario Canada
Thanks for posting these pages of links!! smile Very useful. I can't believe I've missed this thread, there are quite a few papers in here that I can't wait to read.

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#114798 - 09/15/15 04:58 AM Re: Journal papers online - reference list [Re: Robbie]
Berend Offline
Coop Cleaner

Registered: 08/24/12
Posts: 234
Loc: Nederland
Genetic diversity of Hungarian Indigenous Chicken Breeds
by Nóra Bodzsár 2012
Szent István University

http://www.szie.hu/file/tti/archivum/Bodzsar_Nora_thezis.pdf

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#114829 - 09/22/15 05:49 PM Re: Journal papers online - reference list [Re: Berend]
Redcap Online   content
Ruler of the Roost

Registered: 08/14/06
Posts: 946
Loc: Germany
On Monday I found an interesting sex-linked mutation in Stevens, L. (1991). Genetics and Evolution of the Domestic Fowl. Cambridge University Press.
https://books.google.de/books?id=S-DXqQ9...p;q&f=false
https://books.google.de/books?id=S-DXqQ9UOmAC&pg=PA280#v=onepage&q&f=false


Elkin RG, Bauer R, Schneider WJ. (2012). The restricted ovulator chicken strain: an oviparous vertebrate model of reproductive dysfunction caused by a gene defect affecting an oocyte-specific receptor.Anim Reprod Sci. 2012 Dec;136(1-2):1-13.

Abstract

Quote:
A unique non-laying strain of chickens with heritable hyperlipidemia and aortic atherosclerosis was first described in 1974. Subsequent work established that the phenotype results from a naturally occurring point mutation in the gene specifying the very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) receptor, a 95-kDa membrane protein which normally mediates the massive uptake of the main circulating hepatically-synthesized yolk precursors, VLDL and vitellogenin. As a result, hens of the mutant strain termed "restricted ovulator" (R/O) have approximately 5-fold elevations in circulating cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations compared with normal layers, and hepatic lipogenesis and cholesterogenesis are markedly attenuated due to feedback inhibition. R/O hens also exhibit hyperestrogenemia, hypoprogesteronemia, elevated circulating gonadotropins, and up-regulated pituitary progesterone receptor mRNA and isoforms. The ovaries of R/O hens are abnormal in that they lack a follicular hierarchy and contain many small preovulatory follicles of various colors, shapes, and sizes. However, since R/O hens occasionally lay eggs, it is possible that endocytic receptors other than the VLDL receptor may be able to facilitate oocyte growth and/or that yolk precursor uptake can occur via a nonspecific bulk process. A mammalian model of impaired fecundity with abnormal lipoprotein metabolism also has been described, but different mechanisms are likely responsible for its reproductive dysfunction. Nevertheless, as our understanding of the molecular physiology and biochemistry of avian oocyte growth continues to expand, in part due to studies of the R/O model, new analogies may emerge between avian and mammalian systems, which ultimately could help to answer important questions in reproductive biology.


Plus excerpt of the introduction
Quote:
A unique strain of hyperlipidemic female White Leghorn chickens that failed to lay eggs was initially discovered at DeKalb Agricultural Research, Inc. (DeKalb,IL)in the early 1970s. All of the hens were the daughters of a single rooster thought to carry a mutation responsible for the non-laying condition. The existence of this non-laying strain was first reported in the literature by Ho et al.(1974). As compared with wild-type (WT) hens, non-laying hens had approximately 5-fold higher serum levels of cholesterol and triglycerides, a slower daily turnover of cholesterol, attenuated endogenous cholesterol biosynthesis, developed aortic atherosclerosis, and
exhibited abnormal ovarian morphology (Ho et al.,1974).In each of two separate matings of the original mutant DeKalb rooster with WT females, approximately one-half of the offspring hens failed to lay eggs upon reaching sexual maturity. Thus, the condition was heritable and it appeared that the rooster simply carried a mutation causing the abnormal female phenotype since his reproductive functions, secondary sex characteristics, and serum lipid levels were normal (discussed in Section 3). Hence, Ho et al. (1974) referred to the original rooster and those of subsequent generations as “carrier roosters”. Jones et al. (1975) coined the term “restricted ovulator” (R/O) to describe females possessing the mutant gene. Two years later, McGibbon (1977) provided evidence that the sterile condition associated with spontaneous follicular involution was sex-linked and resulted from a single gene defect at a locus (ro) on the sex chromosome Z.


C. R. GRAU and T. E. ROUDYBUSH & W. H. McGIBBON (1979). Mineral Composition of Yolk Fractions and Whole Yolk from Eggs of Restricted Ovulator Hens. Poultry Science (1979), 58 (5): 1143-1148.

Abstract

Quote:
Yolks of eggs laid by hens with the sex-linked restricted ovulator gene (ro) contained less iron and copper and more sodium and potassium than control yolks. Phosphorus levels were not different. The granule fraction of RO yolks contained less iron and manganese than controls; the supernatant contained more sodium, potassium, magnesium, zinc, and iron than controls.

It is suggested that a relationship exists between the effects of the ro gene on iron metabolism and the known hyperlipemia of RO hens.

The yolk ring structure of laid RO eggs was completely disrupted, but rings were found in follicular yolk.
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#114888 - 10/04/15 06:05 AM Re: Journal papers online - reference list [Re: KazJaps]
Redcap Online   content
Ruler of the Roost

Registered: 08/14/06
Posts: 946
Loc: Germany
Domestication/Taming has been proven as a pleiotropic effect to body size and laying performance.

B. Agnvall, A. Ali, S. Olby and P. Jensen (2014). Red Junglefowl (Gallus gallus) selected for low fear of humans are larger, more dominant and produce larger offspring. animal, 8, pp 1498-1505.
http://liu.diva-portal.org/smash/get/diva2:739276/FULLTEXT01.pdf

B Agnvall, R Katajamaa, J Altimiras & P Jensen. Is domestication driven by reduced fear of humans? Boldness, metabolism and serotonin levels in divergently selected red junglefowl (Gallus gallus). Biology Letters, September 2015
http://rsbl.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/11/9/20150509.long
https://www.liu.se/forskning/forskningsnyheter/1.649515?l=en
Abstract only - so far.
Full text after September 2016
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#114889 - 10/04/15 08:34 PM Re: Journal papers online - reference list [Re: Redcap]
KazJaps Offline
Classroom Professor

Registered: 08/30/02
Posts: 2792
Loc: Australia
Karlsson A-C et al.(2015)
The Effect of a Mutation in the Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Receptor (TSHR) on Development, Behaviour and TH Levels in Domesticated Chickens.
PLoS ONE 10(6): e0129040
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4460094/pdf/pone.0129040.pdf

----------------------------
Gheyas et al. 2015
Functional classification of 15 million SNPs detected from diverse chicken populations.
DNA Res (2015) 22 (3): 205-217.
http://dnaresearch.oxfordjournals.org/content/22/3/205.full.pdf
Quote:
....goal to predict variants with potential functional implications (pfVars) from both coding and non-coding regions.

*cites the below Flink et al. paper & further researches the TSHR and BCD02 (yellow skin) genes, plus many others.
-----------------------------
Flink et al. 2014
Establishing the validity of domestication genes using DNA from ancient chickens
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2014 Apr 29; 111(17): 6184–6189.
http://www.pnas.org/content/111/17/6184.full.pdf?with-ds=yes

Quote:
We extracted DNA from 80 ancient chickens excavated from 12 European archaeological sites, dated from &#8764;280 B.C. to the 18th century A.D. We targeted three unlinked genetic loci: the mitochondrial control region, a gene associated with yellow skin color (&#946;-carotene dioxygenase 2), and a putative domestication gene thought to be linked to photoperiod and reproduction (thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor, TSHR). Our results reveal significant variability in both nuclear genes, suggesting that the commonality of yellow skin in Western breeds and the near fixation of TSHR in all modern chickens took place only in the past 500 y.


--------------------------------
Plus your earlier ref. RedCap:

Van Rooijen, J. (2014). Examples of overlooking common sense solutions: the domestication gene and selection against mortality. Frontiers in Genetics, 5, 266.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4124454/pdf/fgene-05-00266.pdf

--------------------------
Forgot to list this one earlier....

The domestic chicken: Causes and consequences of an egg a day.
P. A. Johnson, C. S. Stephens, and J. R. Giles
Poultry Science (April 2015) 94 (4): 816-820
Full Paper

Quote:
growth differentiation factor 9 (GDF9) (Microchromosome 13)
bone morphogenetic factor 15 (BMP15) (Chromosome 4)


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#114890 - 10/04/15 08:46 PM Re: Journal papers online - reference list [Re: KazJaps]
KazJaps Offline
Classroom Professor

Registered: 08/30/02
Posts: 2792
Loc: Australia
Natt et al. 2014
Large Sex Differences in Chicken Behavior and Brain Gene Expression Coincide with Few Differences in Promoter DNA-Methylation
PLoS One. 2014; 9(4): e96376.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4004567/pdf/pone.0096376.pdf

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#114892 - 10/05/15 04:49 PM Re: Journal papers online - reference list [Re: KazJaps]
Redcap Online   content
Ruler of the Roost

Registered: 08/14/06
Posts: 946
Loc: Germany
P. MÉRAT, A. BORDAS, G. Coquerelle, L. Durand. GÈNES A EFFET VISIBLE ET COLORATION OU ÉPAISSEUR DES COQUILLES D'OEUFS. Annales de génétique et de sélection
animale, 1970, 2 (3), pp.263-267. <hal-00892399>
HAL Id: hal-00892399
https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-00892399
Quote:
SUMMARY
GENES WITH VISIBLE EFFECT AND THICKNESS
OR EXTERNAL PIGMENTATION OF EGGSHELLS
Among 12 loci studied in one population, two, concerned with plumage color, show an association with thickness and external pigmentation of eggshells : Pullets with extended black compared with restricted black plumage (E locus) and pullets with colored (ii) vs non-black plumage (Ii) lay eggs with significantly thicker and more intensely pigmented shells. A similar but less marked tendency seems to be associated, for shell thickness, with two other plumage color loci (C and S).


P. MÉRAT, G. Coquerelle, L. Durand. GÈNES A EFFET VISIBLE : RELATION AVEC LA PONTE, LE POIDS DES OEUFS ET LE POIDS DES POULES ADULTES (1). Annales de
génétique et de sélection animale, 1972, 4 (4), pp.555-560. <hal-00892553>
HAL Id: hal-00892553
https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-00892553
Quote:
SUMMARY
GENES WITH VISIBLE EFFECT :
ASSOCIATION WITH EGG LAYING, EGG WEIGHT AND ADULT HEN WEIGHT
Among 1 5 loci studied in one population, one of them, concerning plumage color (C), shows a highly significant association with adult weight of hens and egg weight, white hens (cc) having for these two traits a mean value inferior to colored ones (Cc or CC). The body weight difference appears to be increased in cages vs. on floor, and a parallel result, although not significant, appears for other color genes (I, E, S). For age at first egg and number of eggs laid till about 10 months, no unquestionable effect is associated to the studied loci.


P. MÉRAT, L. Durand. GÈNE Hi ET PRODUCTION D'OEUFS CHEZ LA POULE : INTENSITÈ DE PONTE ET " PAUSES ". Annales de génétique et de sélection animale, 1976, 8 (1),
pp.1-7. <hal-00892709>
HAL Id: hal-00892709
https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-00892709
Quote:
SUMMARY
HI GENE AND EGG PRODUCTION IN THE FOWL: LAYING INTENSITY AND « PAUSES »
Additional data (see DURAND and MÉRAT, 1971, MÉRAT and DURAND 1973) are presented concerning quantitative effects associated to the antigenic-determining Hi gene in three experimental populations.
In the « Jouy » Strain, the overall laying percentage was found higher for the Hihi genotype than for the two homozygotes, as for egg number. « Pause » days defined as cessations of laying for more than 2 consecutive days are less for this genotype. On the contrary, laying percentage excluding « pauses » (highly correlated with mean clutch length) does not differ appreciably between Hihi and hihi hens, although it may be somewhat lower for HiHi ones. Results are given in table I (comparison between Hihi and hihi on pairs of full sisters ; comparison between HiHi and Hihi deduced from average performance of phenotypically Hi daughters in families with different expected proportion of the HiHi and Hihi genotypes). Table 2 includes a variance analysis on family means for the second comparison.
In the «L22» and «M55» strains of the Poultry Research Station at Nouzilly, the present results confirm and extend previous ones, showing a less variable age at first egg and higher egg number till the ages 30, 40 and 50 weeks for the Hihi genotype as compared to hihi, and probably also in a comparison with HiHi made the same way as for the « Jouy » population. On the other hand, egg weight at 30 weeks of age does not differ between genotypes (as observed in the « Jouy »
strain) but at 60 weeks genotype Hihi has the lowest average egg weight.
The possibility of a pleiotropic effect at the Hi locus (as opposed to linkage) is not excluded.
A parallel is suggested with results of SCHEINBERG (1971) on the possible effect of the gene on the distribution of an oestrogen-binding protein. Anyway, it is interesting to isolate a gene (or chromosomal region) with a special effect on «pauses», as little knowledge is available on their genetic and even physiological determination.


P. MÉRAT. Effets associées au gène Na (Cou Nu) sur le poids corporel et le poids des oeufs chez des poules " Normales " et " Naines ". Annales de génétique et de séelection animale, 1979, 11
(2), pp.127-131. <hal-00893113>
HAL Id: hal-00893113
https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-00893113
Quote:
Summary
Effects associated with the Na (Naked neck) gene on body weight and egg weight in normal-sized and dwarf hens
The heterozygous genotype at locus Na (Naked neck) in the Fowl has been found associated with a slight reduction of 8-week weight of cockerels, and a slight but highly significant increase of mean egg weight, in normal-sized (Dw) and dwarf (dw) hens.


P. MÉRAT, A. BORDAS. Corrélations entre production d'oeufs et variables liées à la consommation alimentaire chez des poules rationnées en période de ponte. Annales de génétique et de
sélection animale, 1977, 9 (4), pp.413-422. <hal-00892894>
HAL Id: hal-00892894
https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-00892894
Quote:
Summary
Correlation between egg production and variables associated with ,feed consumption among feed-restricted hens during the laying period Laying hens from a Rhode-Island strain in individual cages were first fed ad libitum, their feed intake and production being observed, then they were restricted to a fixed daily amount of feed during two successive periods. The results were analyzed separately for the group of hens
initially heavier vs. lighter. Egg production with restricted feeding was positively correlated with production in unrestricted condition, and negatively with body weight especially for « heavier» hens), with weight gain in the corresponding period, and with « residual feed consumption in the ad lib. period (especially for « lighter » hens). These preliminary results are briefly discussed in view of possible breeding for egg laying in presence of restricted feeding.


Henri Banga-Mboko, André Bordas, Francis Minvielle, Pascal Leroy. Effects of separate calcium feeding on laying hens selected for low (R-) or high (R+) residual feed consumption. Animal Research, EDP Sciences, 2001, 50 (3), pp.239-250. <10.1051/animres:2001130>. <hal-00889837>
HAL Id: hal-00889837
https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-00889837
Quote:
Abstract —The experiment was carried out with a sample of females from the 21st generation of lines R– and R+ selected divergently for residual food intake in the laying period. After a breeding period of 18 weeks the hens of each line had been distributed among climatic rooms into two groups, one fed with a complete commercial feed (control group) and the other one with both a low calcium feed and
oyster shells given in two separate troughs (treated group). Egg production was recorded during 77 days, egg and shell traits were obtained during the third and fourth weeks of the experiment, and the voluntary consumption of feed was measured over a period of 28 days. The treatment had a significant effect for both lines on average egg weight (p < 0.05), shell weight (p < 0.01), shell thickness (p < 0.01), and albumen thickness (p < 0.05). However, the line ´ treatment interaction was significant for yolk weight (p < 0.05) and voluntary calcium consumption (p < 0.001), indicating that the under-consuming line (R–) showed a better response to separate calcium feeding with a 40% decrease of its residual feed consumption, and better egg and shell qualities. The advantage of line R– might be related to the expression of a specific calcium appetite which is masked in line R+ which ingests excess nutrients.


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