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#116029 - 09/05/16 08:24 AM Re: Definitions(genetic load and others) [Re: Wieslaw]
Wieslaw Offline
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Registered: 09/18/09
Posts: 3751
Loc: Denmark
I'm looking for an English term for something. Not so long ago I read an article in a Danish Scientific Online Periodical about pieces of DNA floating freely in the cells.( I have forgotten the Danish term too). They were supposed to stem from deletions of genes or similar events . The context was, that they were suspected to be cancerogenic. I was trying to google intracellular and intranuclear DNA, but I did not find such a context. Does anybody know what I'm talking about?

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#116030 - 09/05/16 09:17 AM Re: Definitions(genetic load and others) [Re: Redcap]
Redcap Online   content
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Registered: 08/14/06
Posts: 946
Loc: Germany
Epigenes ?? Or Transposons??
Originally Posted By: Redcap
Maybe the deletion of genes could be explained by jumping genes (transposons)?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transposable_element
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#116031 - 09/05/16 12:55 PM Re: Definitions(genetic load and others) [Re: Wieslaw]
dingsda Offline
Bantam

Registered: 09/07/14
Posts: 64
Loc: Germany
Originally Posted By: Wieslaw
I'm looking for an English term for something. Not so long ago I read an article in a Danish Scientific Online Periodical about pieces of DNA floating freely in the cells.( I have forgotten the Danish term too). They were supposed to stem from deletions of genes or similar events . The context was, that they were suspected to be cancerogenic. I was trying to google intracellular and intranuclear DNA, but I did not find such a context. Does anybody know what I'm talking about?


this wikipedia article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Extrachromosomal_DNA names EE (extrachromosomal elements) and DM (double minute chromosomes) in the topic 'medicine and disease'. Maybe this is what you are looking for?

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#116047 - 09/18/16 08:55 AM Re: Definitions(genetic load and others) [Re: dingsda]
Henk69 Offline
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Registered: 02/13/06
Posts: 3208
Loc: Netherlands
Extrachromosomal circular DNA?

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#116069 - 09/28/16 12:45 AM Re: Definitions(genetic load and others) [Re: Henk69]
Wieslaw Offline
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Registered: 09/18/09
Posts: 3751
Loc: Denmark
Thank you guys. "Extrachromosomal" fits and "derived from genomic DNA" fits.

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#116116 - 10/18/16 09:32 AM Re: Definitions(genetic load and others) [Re: Wieslaw]
Wieslaw Offline
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Registered: 09/18/09
Posts: 3751
Loc: Denmark
URGENT:
This one is mostly for native English speakers. I was entrusted with a verification of an English text written by a professional Japanese translator. In a description of a Columbian pattern and where the black is present, she uses a term "sub tail feathers". Does such a term exist at all?, I think she means tail coverts(is this the correct term?)

2)Are the terms secondaries and inner flight feathers equally correct? (she wrote sub wings)

3)The target audience of the text will be the "normal people". I need a term for e+ that will be universally "understood by everybody". Is "wild type pattern" understood by "non-geneticist"?

Please hurry



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#116117 - 10/18/16 10:07 AM Re: Definitions(genetic load and others) [Re: Wieslaw]
Canuck_Bock_RAT Offline
Chicken

Registered: 01/05/12
Posts: 104
Loc: Alberta, Canada
1) Co pattern in male, black diamonds would be on SADDLE of male. Female has no black on her CUSHION.

The portion where the male does not have black diamonds, is his BACK.

Columbian pattern as per SOP APA 2010, page 36...Silver Columbian is being described I believe... grin

MALE

Quote:

BACK: Silvery white.
Cape -- black and white.
Saddle -- silvery white with an elongated V-shaped black stripe increasing in width, length and density as it nears the tail coverts.

...

TAIL: Main Tail -- black.
Main and Lesser Sickles -- lustrous, greenish black.
Coverts -- lustrous. greenish black, laced with silvery white.


FEMALE

Quote:

TAIL: Main Tail -- black, except two top feathers, which are slightly laced with white.



2) APA SOP 2010 page 20...wings...



Uh, sub would be more likely to be submarine...and we all don't live in a Yellow Submarine (breaks into The Beatles rendition and clears room with screeching voice!) crazy


3) Regards to "normal persons" I would say what Sigrid says may deem workable.

GENETICS of Chicken Colours, pg 38

Quote:
e"+", Wild type 'partridge'



Dr. Carefoot, Creative Poultry Breeding, page 194

[quote]e"+" wild type plumage[\quote]


But I too would go with "wild type pattern!"

Partridge may confuse as we see that term used and there are many English speakers who have NO clue what that pattern is on a chicken thinking it is the partridge in a pear tree (little early for that, eh).

LOL Hope this helps you...in a rush to post it so other English speakers need to validate this too.

<hugs>

Tara

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#116118 - 10/18/16 10:32 AM Re: Definitions(genetic load and others) [Re: Canuck_Bock_RAT]
Wieslaw Offline
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Registered: 09/18/09
Posts: 3751
Loc: Denmark
Thank you Tara, that was QUICK!!!
Do others have the same perception of "wild type pattern" as Tara?
Some European English present??

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#116119 - 10/19/16 02:09 AM Re: Definitions(genetic load and others) [Re: Wieslaw]
Hen-Gen Online   content
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Registered: 10/01/05
Posts: 1135
Loc: Island of Fetlar, Shetland
Yes, I'll go along with Tara though for me a sub is a kind of sandwich from an American fast food chain!

Always avoided the word 'partridge' in relation to wild type because it is a colour of Wyandotte based on eb, Pg and s+.

To be honest I don't think that a non geneticist would understand wild type.
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#116120 - 10/19/16 07:17 AM Re: Definitions(genetic load and others) [Re: Hen-Gen]
John Online   content
Chicken

Registered: 04/21/11
Posts: 75
Loc: Michigan
Wild Type probably needs at least a little definition. There was a paper referred to in another topic here that used
Quote:
E*N, wild type;
with "N" for Normal. Maybe define wild type as the gene(s) normally or typically found in wild chickens...or whatever.


Edited by John (10/19/16 07:18 AM)
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