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#116412 - 01/31/17 08:23 PM Re: Journal papers online - reference list [Re: KazJaps]
Redcap Offline
Ruler of the Roost

Registered: 08/14/06
Posts: 954
Loc: Germany
So, the ancestral background of Gyeongbuk Araucana is similar to the Cream Legbar.
http://www.creamlegbarclub.com/20-history-of-the-cream-legbar
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#116489 - 03/02/17 01:21 AM Re: Journal papers online - reference list [Re: Redcap]
Wieslaw Offline
Moderator
Classroom Professor

Registered: 09/18/09
Posts: 3768
Loc: Denmark

Melanism in guinea fowl (Numida meleagris) is associated with a deletion of Phenylalanine-256 in the MC1R gene.

Vidal O1, Araguas RM, Fernández E, Heras S, Sanz N, Pla C.
Author information

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20477788?log$=activity


Abstract
We have characterized a deletion in the MC1R gene causing the loss of one amino acid (p.Phe256del), which is perfectly associated with melanism in guinea fowl (Numida meleagris). Co-segregation of the p.Phe256del with melanism was confirmed in 25 offspring born from a cross of two heterozygote birds; therefore we suggest that this mutation is responsible for the black phenotype. Interestingly, this is the first case of recessive melanism linked to MC1R.





Variability of the melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) gene explains the segregation of the bronze locus in turkey (Meleagris gallopavo).

Vidal O1, Viñas J, Pla C.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20634512?log$=activity


Abstract
By sequencing the full coding region of the turkey melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) gene, we have found 4 mutations (c.96G > A, c.364A > T, c.450C > T, and c.887C > T) that are organized in 5 different haplotypes (MC1R*1 to MC1R*5). These haplotypes correlate perfectly with the 3 alleles of the bronze locus (i.e., B, b(+), and b(1)). We suggest that the dominant black phenotype, associated with the B allele, results from the constitutive activation of the receptor, an effect that might be mediated by the missense mutation c.364A > T (p.Ile122Phe). Moreover, we propose that the recessive black-winged bronze phenotype (linked to b(1)) might be produced by 2 deleterious mutations of MC1R (c.96G > A and c.887C > T). This is an unexpected finding because in mammals, MC1R deleterious polymorphisms are usually related with either red or lighter fur colors.

Inheritance of wing feather development rate in guinea fowl (Numida meleagris).

Pal SK1, Singh H.
Author information


Abstract
1. A study of primary wing feather development rate in guinea fowl revealed genetic control through a single pair of sex-linked alleles. The allele for slow feathering (K) was dominant over that for rapid feathering (k+). 2. Wing feather sexing showed 94% accuracy in 10-d-old keets. 3. Incidence of rapid feathering allele (k+) was higher in the population selected for high body weight compared to the unselected population

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9280348?log$=activity


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#116490 - 03/02/17 01:35 AM Re: Journal papers online - reference list [Re: Wieslaw]
Wieslaw Offline
Moderator
Classroom Professor

Registered: 09/18/09
Posts: 3768
Loc: Denmark
https://gsejournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12711-017-0287-4

A genome-wide association study in a large F2-cross of laying hens reveals novel genomic regions associated with feather pecking and aggressive pecking behavior

Vanessa Lutz
Email author
, Patrick Stratz, Siegfried Preuß, Jens Tetens, Michael A. Grashorn, Werner Bessei and Jörn Bennewitz


Edited by Wieslaw (03/02/17 01:47 AM)

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#116498 - 03/04/17 02:36 PM Re: Journal papers online - reference list [Re: Wieslaw]
Wieslaw Offline
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Classroom Professor

Registered: 09/18/09
Posts: 3768
Loc: Denmark

Whole-genome resequencing of Xishuangbanna fighting chicken to identify signatures of selection (free file)

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5000499/

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#116499 - 03/04/17 02:39 PM Re: Journal papers online - reference list [Re: Wieslaw]
Wieslaw Offline
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Classroom Professor

Registered: 09/18/09
Posts: 3768
Loc: Denmark
Abstract

Whole-genome resequencing reveals loci under selection during chicken domestication.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20220755/

Domestic animals are excellent models for genetic studies of phenotypic evolution. They have evolved genetic adaptations to a new environment, the farm, and have been subjected to strong human-driven selection leading to remarkable phenotypic changes in morphology, physiology and behaviour. Identifying the genetic changes underlying these developments provides new insight into general mechanisms by which genetic variation shapes phenotypic diversity. Here we describe the use of massively parallel sequencing to identify selective sweeps of favourable alleles and candidate mutations that have had a prominent role in the domestication of chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) and their subsequent specialization into broiler (meat-producing) and layer (egg-producing) chickens. We have generated 44.5-fold coverage of the chicken genome using pools of genomic DNA representing eight different populations of domestic chickens as well as red jungle fowl (Gallus gallus), the major wild ancestor. We report more than 7,000,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms, almost 1,300 deletions and a number of putative selective sweeps. One of the most striking selective sweeps found in all domestic chickens occurred at the locus for thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR), which has a pivotal role in metabolic regulation and photoperiod control of reproduction in vertebrates. Several of the selective sweeps detected in broilers overlapped genes associated with growth, appetite and metabolic regulation. We found little evidence that selection for loss-of-function mutations had a prominent role in chicken domestication, but we detected two deletions in coding sequences that we suggest are functionally important. This study has direct application to animal breeding and enhances the importance of the domestic chicken as a model organism for biomedical research.

Whole pdf fil:

http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v464/n7288/pdf/nature08832.pdf



Edited by Wieslaw (03/05/17 02:00 PM)
Edit Reason: added link

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#116501 - 03/05/17 10:09 AM Re: Journal papers online - reference list [Re: Wieslaw]
Wieslaw Offline
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Classroom Professor

Registered: 09/18/09
Posts: 3768
Loc: Denmark
Previously listed by Kazjaps as an abstract, here is the whole document. Grab it while you can:

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1755-148X.2010.00700.x/epdf

Sex-linked barring in chickens is controlled by the CDKN2A/B tumour suppressor locus

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#116502 - 03/05/17 04:51 PM Re: Journal papers online - reference list [Re: Wieslaw]
Wieslaw Offline
Moderator
Classroom Professor

Registered: 09/18/09
Posts: 3768
Loc: Denmark
Grab while you can

Increased copy number of SOCS2 gene in Chinese gamecocks

https://www.researchgate.net/publication...inese_gamecocks

Partial duplication of the PRLR and SPEF2 genes at the late feathering locus in chicken Whole document

http://bmcgenomics.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1471-2164-9-391



Edited by Wieslaw (03/09/17 01:38 PM)
Edit Reason: added link

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#116505 - 03/09/17 11:39 AM Re: Journal papers online - reference list [Re: Wieslaw]
Wieslaw Offline
Moderator
Classroom Professor

Registered: 09/18/09
Posts: 3768
Loc: Denmark
Previously listed as an abstract, here is the whole document

The twofold difference in adult size between the red junglefowl and White Leghorn chickens is largely explained by a limited number of QTLs.

http://www.animalgenome.org/QTLdb/references/12873214.pdf


Domestication and tameness: brain gene expression in red junglefowl selected for less fear of humans suggests effects on reproduction and immunology. Whole document


Bélteky J1, Agnvall B1, Johnsson M1, Wright D1, Jensen P1.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27853585

Abstract
The domestication of animals has generated a set of phenotypic modifications, affecting behaviour, appearance, physiology and reproduction, which are consistent across a range of species. We hypothesized that some of these phenotypes could have evolved because of genetic correlation to tameness, an essential trait for successful domestication. Starting from an outbred population of red junglefowl, ancestor of all domestic chickens, we selected birds for either high or low fear of humans for five generations. Birds from the fifth selected generation (S5) showed a divergent pattern of growth and reproduction, where low fear chickens grew larger and produced larger offspring. To examine underlying genetic mechanisms, we used microarrays to study gene expression in thalamus/hypothalamus, a brain region involved in fear and stress, in both the parental generation and the S5. While parents of the selection lines did not show any differentially expressed genes, there were a total of 33 genes with adjusted p-values below 0.1 in S5. These were mainly related to sperm-function, immunological functions, with only a few known to be relevant to behaviour. Hence, five generations of divergent selection for fear of humans produced changes in hypothalamic gene expression profiles related to pathways associated with male reproduction and to immunology. This may be linked to the effects seen on growth and size of offspring. These results support the hypothesis that domesticated phenotypes may evolve because of correlated effects related to reduced fear of humans.



Edited by Wieslaw (03/09/17 12:31 PM)
Edit Reason: added link

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#116506 - 03/10/17 04:39 PM Re: Journal papers online - reference list [Re: Wieslaw]
Wieslaw Offline
Moderator
Classroom Professor

Registered: 09/18/09
Posts: 3768
Loc: Denmark
Anim Sci J. 2016 Aug 17. doi: 10.1111/asj.12677. [Epub ahead of print]

Involvement of circadian clock in crowing of red jungle fowls (Gallus gallus).

Ito S1, Hori S2, Hirose M1, Iwahara M2, Yatsushiro A2, Matsumoto A3, Tanaka M4, Okamoto C1, Yayou KI5, Shimmura T6,7,8.
Author information


Abstract
The rhythmic locomotor behavior of flies and mice provides a phenotype for the identification of clock genes, and the underlying molecular mechanism is well studied. However, interestingly, when examining locomotor rhythm in the wild, several key laboratory-based assumptions on circadian behavior are not supported in natural conditions. The rooster crowing 'cock-a-doodle-doo' is a symbol of the break of dawn in many countries. Previously, we used domestic inbred roosters and showed that the timing of roosters' crowing is regulated by the circadian clock under laboratory conditions. However, it is still unknown whether the regulation of crowing by circadian clock is observed under natural conditions. Therefore, here we used red jungle fowls and first confirmed that similar crowing rhythms with domesticated chickens are observed in red jungle fowls under the laboratory conditions. Red jungle fowls show predawn crowing before light onset under 12:12 light&#8201;:&#8201;dim light conditions and the free-running rhythm of crowing under total dim light conditions. We next examined the crowing rhythms under semi-wild conditions. Although the crowing of red jungle fowls changed seasonally under semi-wild conditions, predawn crowing was observed before sunrise in all seasons. This evidence suggests that seasonally changed crowing of red jungle fowls is under the control of a circadian clock.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27530363


The highest-ranking rooster has priority to announce the break of dawn Whole article

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4512148/


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#116509 - 03/12/17 10:58 PM Re: Journal papers online - reference list [Re: Wieslaw]
KazJaps Offline
Classroom Professor

Registered: 08/30/02
Posts: 2805
Loc: Australia

A Major Locus for Quantitatively Measured Shank Skin Color Traits in Korean Native Chicken.
Jin S, Lee JH, Seo DW, et al.
Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences. 2016;29(11):1555-1561. doi:10.5713/ajas.16.0183.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5088374/

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Association of MC1R genotypes with shank color traits in Korean native chicken.
Jin S, Park HB, Seo DW, Cahyadi M, Choi NR, Heo KN, Jo C, Lee JH. Livest Sci. 2014;170:1–7.
http://www.docsford.com/document/5754507


Edited by KazJaps (03/13/17 12:04 AM)
Edit Reason: added 2014 paper

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