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#104514 - 07/05/12 01:29 AM Re: Behavioral issues [Re: Henk69]
Wieslaw Offline
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Classroom Professor

Registered: 09/18/09
Posts: 3840
Loc: Denmark
There was no folding on this comb to begin with, it was perfecly upright. I do not keep cocks with foldings(I did it once experimentally but for the sake of extra unusual plumage). The hens do not need foldings to peck the comb.

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#105070 - 08/02/12 05:20 AM Re: Behavioral issues [Re: Wieslaw]
Wieslaw Offline
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Classroom Professor

Registered: 09/18/09
Posts: 3840
Loc: Denmark
I have two observations concerning some vocalizations. They are definitely genetic in my opinion.

1) Two years ago I had a cock who was 'singing' all day long(I do not mean crowing, but uttering a long sound like they do if a sparrow or something flies by.(Is it a shrill?? or trill??or what??). He was doing it just for pleasure without any reason at all (probably getting on my neighbours' last nerve). I hatched some eggs fathered by him after he was gone, and a son of him , whom I kept , developed the same bad habit. No way he could hear this sound from anybody.

2)Responsiveness. I have a habit of talking baby-talk, when I walk into the coop in the evenings. There was always the same hen who responded by 'singing back' to me. We could do it repeatedly. Now I have a daughter of the hen who has overtaken the role of the 'talking one'.

And one observation more. I had one cock who was living temporarily in a cage in my basement. I had some small chicks running around the cage. I could swear that he was scaring them ON PURPOSE with unnecessary warning calls, 'watching with joy' as they scattered around in all directions. After that he was 'talking something to himself ' under his nose, looking pleased of himself. Sense of comicality with birds ?????

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#116525 - 03/19/17 02:58 PM Re: Behavioral issues [Re: Wieslaw]
Wieslaw Offline
Moderator
Classroom Professor

Registered: 09/18/09
Posts: 3840
Loc: Denmark
Here are some videos with interesting behaviors:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=An1BHXZ48dw

It looks to me like a sparrowhawk, not a goshawk

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NPcM74U_NfM


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#116527 - 03/19/17 03:42 PM Re: Behavioral issues [Re: Wieslaw]
Canuck_Bock_RAT Offline
Chicken

Registered: 01/05/12
Posts: 105
Loc: Alberta, Canada
Heel low:

Originally Posted By: Wieslaw
Another behavioral question. Relationship between cocks and small chicks. I have recently seen one of my aquantainces placed some chicks under a bantam Pekin cock(in a cage). The cock was just sitting there with the chicks under him. Sometimes you can also see pictures with a hen with chicks and a 'helping father'. With my own cocks the best case scenario is that they pretend the chicks do not exist. Does it require special genetics to show the behaviour of 'caring' about chicks? I have not heard about RJF cocks running in the jungle helping the chicks, so it is most probably 'against their nature'.

Here is a link to CJR's site with a picture of fathers with the chicks under their wings. Does it only occur in bantams?

http://www.dutchbantams.com/


For the life of me can't remember where but just recently read a story about turkeys, likely in an old poultry publication too.

Turkey tom would put his wings out for poults to run under and stay dry during sudden rain storms.

Then when the poults were grown, they seemed to remember this kindness and when the tom was plagued by insects on his face (wish I remembered the story better), the poults would come and pick these nasties off his face.

I see no reason why some birds are not more maternal (kind) to babies. See it in cows...one cow loves calves and will babysit while the others go out to graze. Wolves will do it and some females even have the ability to nurse pups--a group effort. The species as a whole would do well to have qualified caregivers, no matter what gender. smile

My Australian Black Swan pairs take turns incubating eggs. grin

Doggone & Chicken UP!

Tara Lee Higgins
Higgins Rat Ranch Conservation Farm, Alberta, Canada

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#117317 - 11/08/18 12:01 PM Re: Behavioral issues [Re: Marvin]
Wieslaw Offline
Moderator
Classroom Professor

Registered: 09/18/09
Posts: 3840
Loc: Denmark
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23911692

Effects of feather pecking phenotype (severe feather peckers, victims and non-peckers) on serotonergic and dopaminergic activity in four brain areas of laying hens (Gallus gallus domesticus).



Quote:
Abstract
Severe feather pecking (SFP) in laying hens is a detrimental behavior causing loss of feathers, skin damage and cannibalism. Previously, we have associated changes in frontal brain serotonin (5-HT) turnover and dopamine (DA) turnover with alterations in feather pecking behavior in young pullets (28-60 days). Here, brain monoamine levels were measured in adult laying hens; focusing on four brain areas that are involved in emotional behavior or are part of the basal ganglia-thalamopallial circuit, which is involved in obsessive compulsive disorders. Three behavioral phenotypes were studied: Severe Feather Peckers (SFPs), Victims of SFP, and Non-Peckers (NPs). Hens (33 weeks old) were sacrificed after a 5-min manual restraint test. SFPs had higher 5-HIAA levels and a higher serotonin turnover (5-HIAA/5-HT) in the dorsal thalamus than NPs, with intermediate levels in victims. NPs had higher 5-HT levels in the medial striatum than victims, with levels of SFPs in between. 5-HT turnover levels did not differ between phenotypes in medial striatum, arcopallium and hippocampus. DA turnover levels were not affected by feather pecking phenotype. These findings indicate that serotonergic neurotransmission in the dorsal thalamus and striatum of adult laying hens depends on differences in behavioral feather pecking phenotype, with, compared to non-pecking hens, changes in both SFP and their victims. Further identification of different SFP phenotypes is needed to elucidate the role of brain monoamines in SFP.

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