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#117413 - 06/01/19 02:33 AM Mahogany
Hebe Offline
Feather

Registered: 07/24/16
Posts: 39
Loc: UK
Can someone please point me in the direction of the early papers on Mahogany and its behaviour.

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#117414 - 06/08/19 05:23 PM Re: Mahogany [Re: Hebe]
Hen-Gen Offline
Ruler of the Roost

Registered: 10/01/05
Posts: 1181
Loc: Island of Fetlar, Shetland
Certainly I canít. But hopefully KazJaps will come by and be able to answer your question.
I hope you donít mind me asking but where in the UK are you?


Edited by Hen-Gen (06/08/19 05:25 PM)
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#117415 - 06/10/19 11:49 AM Re: Mahogany [Re: Hebe]
Marvin Offline
Lord of the Fowl

Registered: 11/23/06
Posts: 2008
Loc: Nicaragua
Originally Posted By: Hebe
Can someone please point me in the direction of the early papers on Mahogany and its behaviour.
Mahogany was isolated from Buff Minorca

in my experience Mh is completely dominant to mh+, that means that Mh/mh+ is as strong as Mh/Mh, any perceived differences would be due to other genes that enhance or ihibit its expression on F1s. for example RIR are not that dark due to Mh alone.

Here is a very good read on the outstanding work of the renowned team of Dr. John Albert Brumbaugh and Dr. Willard Fisher Hollander.

http://www.chickencolours.com/Genetics of Buff Brum&Holl.pdf

Some excerpts from: A study of the genetic control of black-red pigment patterns in the fowl.

Dr. J. A Brumbaugh:

The successful teacher teaches not only with his mind but also with his hands. The author wishes to express his deep appreciation to such a teacher - Dr. Willard F. Hollander.

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#117421 - 06/15/19 05:57 PM Re: Mahogany [Re: Marvin]
KazJaps Offline
Classroom Professor

Registered: 08/30/02
Posts: 2899
Loc: Australia
Brumbaugh, John Albert, "A study of the genetic control of black-red pigment patterns in the fowl" (1963).
Retrospective Theses and Dissertations. Paper 2374.

The following link has all the above paper's colour photos, listed as supplemental files (for download)
http://lib.dr.iastate.edu/rtd/2374
-------------------------

Redcap also posted the following on Brumbaugh's dissertation paper.....
Color pictures are integrated now
http://documents.kippenjungle.nl/#post27
Better text resolution with 9 MB
http://documents.kippenjungle.nl/#post28
I can offer a 35 MB and 18 MB version aswell

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#117422 - 06/15/19 06:08 PM Re: Mahogany [Re: KazJaps]
KazJaps Offline
Classroom Professor

Registered: 08/30/02
Posts: 2899
Loc: Australia
Also some more on Mh in PB&G book 1990, and some minor references in other journal papers, as Smyth et al. were able to obtain Mh birds from Brumbaugh and Hollander, extracted from the original Buff Minorca rooster test breeding research (they also obtained ey birds from Brumbaugh).

With these original Mh tester line birds, they did various test breeding research, including test breeding with New Hampshire Red and Rhode Island Red lines (see PB&G, both breed lines had Mh).

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#117423 - 06/15/19 06:51 PM Re: Mahogany [Re: KazJaps]
KazJaps Offline
Classroom Professor

Registered: 08/30/02
Posts: 2899
Loc: Australia
Excerpts from Brumbaugh's dissertation paper:

Mahogany Mh/mh+ heterozygotes
Quote:
The mahogany heterozygote chick is indistinguishable from wild type.

The typical adult male has "spangled" breast feathers (black tip with red base). The size of the spangle varies between individual birds. It may just appear at the very tips of the feathers, or it may include almost the whole feather leaving just a red shaft.

The typical adult female exhibits a slight reddening of all body feathers, particularly evident in the breast and wing bows.


Mahogany Mh/Mh homozygotes
Quote:
The typical mahogany homozygote chick is nearly wild type. A slight narrowness of the black stripes is noted in some cases. This difference is too subtle, however, to permit classification of the chicks.

The typical adult male is a deep red with black remaining in the flights and tail, similar to Rhode Island Red.

The typical female is essentially a deep red, but remnants of the wild-type stippling still persist.

* The above description of Mh/Mh homozygotes suggests more eumelanin restriction than indicated by Smyth in PB&G. There is some variation in bird phenotypes in the colour plates of Mh in Brumbaugh's paper. Hard to know if they had extracted Mh/Mh from other modifiers in their final Mh description, possibly by Smyth et al. stage they had isolated /extracted Mh in the tester line, a more accurate description?

There is a brief mention of Mh in the following paper
GEORGE W. MALONE and J. ROBERT SMYTH, JR.
The Influence of the E, Co and I Loci on the Expression of the Silver (S) and Gold (s+) Alleles in the Fowl.
Poultry Science (1979) 58 (3): 489-497 doi:10.3382/ps.0580489

My earlier post:
http://www.the-coop.org/forums/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=114515#Post114515
Quote:
Mh was segregating in the ey line (not distinguishable on ey chick), etc...


*As I mentioned earlier, Smyth et al. obtained ey birds from Brumbaugh and Hollander, it seems early on these ey were segregating Mh. I don't know if Smyth's ey tester line imported by Campo et al. Spanish researchers were descendant only from Brumbaugh's ey line, or whether Smyth added additional ey lines? What is certain is that Smyth's ey tester line was substantiated through DNA testing as different to eWh allele.

Possibly Malone may mention more on Mh in his related thesis paper (based on same / similar test breeding research). It was possibly Malone that did the RIR Mh test breeding mentioned by Smyth in PB&G (I don't have a copy handy). I don't have a copy of Malone's thesis paper, only hard copies available in the UK and USA libraries, last time I looked.

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