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#15437 - 07/14/03 08:50 AM crusty beak, blowing noses
Anonymous
Unregistered


A week ago a 3 week old chick died suddenly- no symptoms, a Plymouth Rock Bantam. I had a bird die yesterday, no symptoms. A male Araucana about 6 months old.

2 weeks ago I had one chicken sneezing. No crusting, no fever, she did have loose stools. She is about 7 months old, a standard cochin.

Now all the birds are snorting/blowing their noses, and most have crusting. They are not lethargic(beyond what would be normal on an 80* day). There is NO smell to the discharge. They do not have swollen eyes or any eye discharge. Combs and whattles are normal. Egg production is down.
Any one have any idea what it could be and how to treat? I began with Araumicin(sp) yesterday.
Thanks!

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#15438 - 07/14/03 07:23 PM Re: crusty beak, blowing noses
Anonymous
Unregistered


Bummer man,sounds exactly like mycoplasma. Had it and have no birds now as a result. Waiting till next year to get birds to get rid of it.It can stay alive in organic/fecal matter for 4 mos or more. No cure. Meds will make them look/act better but as soon as you stop all symptoms come back. While it won't outright kill them itself it causes the sneezing and snotty noses and it makes them susceptible to attack from other diseases as well as making them unthrifty and poor layers.The eggs will show more wrinkles and rough spots too.The birds will also lose weight and be thin. Wait'll winter if you think it's bad now.It's very contagious and spreads through wild birds and vermin and off your feet when you go places after through stepping on fecal matter, bodily discharges,sheddings.You can be certain but it's gonna cost ya a visit to the vet.A blood sample can be sent by the vet to the state lab in Reynoldsburg here in Ohio.It's $10/bird for blood test + whatever your vet charges for a visit. Takes 7-10 days or so to get results.
It's a very common disease, 90% of small flocks have it . I wish more flock owners would take responsibility for not spreading diseases and get their birds tested and not spread these diseases around. We got rid of pullorum for the most part,why not some of these other diseases that still plague bird owners ,whether commercial or private flocks? frown mad confused )

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#15439 - 07/15/03 02:53 AM Re: crusty beak, blowing noses
Anonymous
Unregistered


o man they are'nt even my birds and i don't want to hear that. could you please give more details about the mycoplasma i've never heard of it.is there another name? frown confused

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#15440 - 07/15/03 05:41 AM Re: crusty beak, blowing noses
Anonymous
Unregistered


Mycoplasma is, as I said,very common. Most chicken people refer to it as a cold but chickens can't get colds and anytime a birds is sneezing w/ any regularity it's not good. What's regularly? If you can hear the bird/s are sneezing just standing or foraging around or while roosting at night you got issues. Type Mycoplasma gallisepticum or M. synovia into your search engine. It's very depresssing reading but all chicken owners should be aware of this.
It broke my heart frown to kill the birds I raised from wee bitty things,they were very tame and well trained but I'm not going to be someone who is perpetuating a disease. It can potentially spread into and through wild birds which makes it even more an imperative we don't let the disease get a hold, )

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#15441 - 07/15/03 11:23 AM Re: crusty beak, blowing noses
Anonymous
Unregistered


What differentiates it from a respiratory infection? Mine arent sneezing, they seem to be blowing through their noses in an effort to clear them. There is also no mucus to see, its just a bit of crusting on some of their noses. I'd sure hate to destroy them all. And I havent had any deformed eggs either.

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#15442 - 07/15/03 05:10 PM Re: crusty beak, blowing noses
Bill Ludwig Offline
Classroom Professor

Registered: 07/17/02
Posts: 2582
Loc: Ohio
Mycoplasmosis is a group of diseases. Look here for details- http://www.merckvetmanual.com/mvm/index.jsp?cfile=htm/bc/toc_203500.htm Good luck.

Bill

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#15443 - 07/15/03 06:12 PM Re: crusty beak, blowing noses
Anonymous
Unregistered


Update:
Chickens have been on antibiotics for one day now. Crustiness is gone, snorting is down. I had no eggs yesterday, and today I am back to normal production. No differences in egg texture, look or size/shape. Does this eliminate any suspected illness'?
Thanks!

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#15444 - 07/16/03 05:18 AM Re: crusty beak, blowing noses
Anonymous
Unregistered


Respiratory infections tend to be chronic and meds will keep symptoms covered.They won't go away,sorry to say. Any bird that does"recover" is a carrier and can pass it to others.If your birds have'nt had it for long then no egg affected yet but if they do you'll see it eventually.Some birds don't suffer as badly but none are immune. Summer is easier on them than winter.
The blowing to clear the mucus is a clear indicator of respiratory infection.Sounds like they are just coming down w/ it.
Have you gotten any new birds recently that might have introduced this? If not,then sparrows or starlings may have brought it from a sick flock they were scamming waste feed from. You may have also brought it in on your feet if you've been to a show/swap/auction. )

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#15445 - 07/17/03 10:43 PM Re: crusty beak, blowing noses
KazJaps Offline
Classroom Professor

Registered: 08/30/02
Posts: 2807
Loc: Australia
Spur, I'm starting to wonder if your birds had both CRD & Infectious Bronchitis (IB)? Usually CRD is rather mild, but it is a different story if in combination with other respiratory diseases. I haven't heard of egg deformity with CRD or Coryza, but it is a symptom of IB.

* Mycoplasma may also be transmitted by eggs, so day-old chicks may already be infected (depending on management practises, eg egg treatments/antibiotics, vaccinations, clean breeding stock). The infected chicks may not show symptoms for weeks, months, or not at all.

Some other links on Mycoplasmosis (CRD - Chronic Respiratory Disease):
http://groups.msn.com/PolishChickens/mycoplasmosis.msnw

-an Australian article:
http://www.dpi.qld.gov.au/poultry/5111.html

If you started killing off Mycoplasma carrier birds in Australia, I doubt there would be many birds left! But I'm starting to wonder if Mycoplasma gallisepticum is in a more virulent form in the US.

Quote:
Some birds don't suffer as badly but none are immune
I'm not sure about this statement, unless you are just saying that none are immune to becoming carriers of Mycoplasma. The majority of chickens are carriers of the Marek's herpes virus, but they don't have Marek's disease. There is quite a distinction. My understanding is that there is usually a trigger (stressor) for Mycoplasma carrier birds to develop respiratory disease. You will find reference in "Poultry Breeding & Genetics" of breeding Mycoplasmoses genetically resistant birds.

I also disagree if you are suggesting that "all" birds that have experienced Mycoplasma become chronic (ie repeated disease episodes). That hasn't been my experience with the majority of my flock & I don't use antibiotics for CRD. It's usually so mild, I let them be (& why I'm thinking the US has a more virulent strain?). I've found that certain lines were more susceptible to CRD, or any bug for that matter. I cull them from breeding programs (ie, chronic birds). The emphasis for me is on breeding tough resistant birds, vaccinating for the nasty diseases (that can wipe out your flock) & good poultry management practises to keep general health & fitness within my flock. So when they are disease challenged, they have the stamina to overcome it. And I mean “WHEN” they are diseased challenged, not IF! Because of this, my methods of disease management need to differ from total bio-secure & commercial operations. With my situation, I wouldn't want to sell birds to someone else, knowing that they couldn't even handle Mycoplasma.

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#15446 - 07/18/03 06:53 AM Re: crusty beak, blowing noses
Anonymous
Unregistered


KJ, my diagnosis was not speculation but was done through blood analysis by the state agricultural lab and they tested for a dozen of the major poultry diseases so I can be certain of what my birds had,both M.synoviae and gallisepticum and no other diseaes were present.
While egg deformities were not present in all birds there was a definite granulation of some of the shells and wrinkles on the pointed end of others.
M. synoviae is not as pathogenic as gallisepticum and signs are more apt to remain latent till the bird is stressed.Maybe you have a less pathogenic strain.There are a # of named strains of the spp of mycoplasmas so it goes further than just three spp that affect birds.Three spp w/ a number of adaptable strains of varying virulaence.
I will respectfully disagree w/ you on the mareks assessment. Or maybe it's just the birds I had. I have taken several groups of birds for testing and Mareks is about #1 on the list for diseases to be indentified and none of my birds had it.
You mention that most birds down there have Mycoplasma. Well,according to a study done by the U. of Arkansas, here in the US 90% of small flocks have it and 70% or more of commercial flocks have it. Very pernicious disease. Pullorum used to be this way too but we're almost rid of it through diligence and testing.
Yes,I meant all will be carriers. And while they may not exhibit symptoms they wiil get other birds sick. This does not mean they are not themselves sick w/ it,just not showing symptoms as their bodily defenses have adapted to it.
In trying to research this disease I came across many resources/references that were of the opinion that Mycoplasmas were a manageable disease and the general feeling was it is something that most will have to deal w/.I just think that's the drug industry talking as there were always recommendations of medications. I met two PhD's in poultry,Dr.Yan Zhang of OSU and Dr.John Giambrone of Arkansas U who believe the same as I do: mycoplasma can be prevented w/ clean stock and strict biosecurity.I know of disease free flocks and sources of birds(blood tested) so I refuse to be one who will own any sick birds. Zero tolerance for any and all chronic diseases,regards, )

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