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#18457 - 05/12/03 12:01 PM cull by neck pulling?
Anonymous
Unregistered


Ok, I've finally decided the best thing to do is to kill my leghorn. Her quality of life is not good, and she's not improved in over a month. Her neck is deformed, and she can't really get around. I have volunteers to pull her neck, but am feeling like I need to suck it up and do it myself. I suppose it's because I feel responsible for my animals' lives, to the end. So what is the easiest way to help her out of the world? I was thinking pulling the neck, as described by Damerow. Suggestions?

I'm a little nervous, but I do have good resolve. I know it's the right thing for me to do.

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#18458 - 05/12/03 02:29 PM Re: cull by neck pulling?
Bill Ludwig Offline
Classroom Professor

Registered: 07/17/02
Posts: 2582
Loc: Ohio
First, I'm sorry she never got better. You gave her every chance. I have only used an axe myself. I think its easier to follow through. I remember reading about pulling the neck also. I think the reason for that method had to do with meat quality? Well...I'm not sure good luck is the right term here but you know what I mean.

Bill

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#18459 - 05/13/03 09:33 AM Re: cull by neck pulling?
R. Okimoto Offline
Lord of the Fowl

Registered: 07/18/02
Posts: 1498
Loc: Arkansas
I don't like to do cervical dislocation (breaking the neck). It is pretty gruesome to do on older birds. Young chicks can be dispatched fairly easily by popping their neck on a corner and putting pressure with your thumb. Even with their necks broken and the loss of control of their bodies birds can keep breathing for a pretty long time. I can't help but think that their brains are still aware because their hearts keep beating supplying blood.

I prefer carbon dioxide affixiation. If you put a bird in an atmosphere of 20-40% carbon dioxide it is usually unconscious within 10 seconds and dead soon after. You can do this with a few chips of dry ice in a plastic bag. The birds go so fast that they go brain dead and start to thrash around as if you broke their necks, but they are already out of it by then. You only have to buy enough dry ice to get it home from WalMart before it evaporates.

Some people use ether or chloroform. Ether is highly flambable and dangerous. The source is your automotive supply store and those cans that you are supposed to use to help start your car. Chloroform is harder to get and is a carcinogen (cancer causing agent). You just dampen a few cotton balls with these chemicals and put them in a plastic bag with your bird and seal it until the bird is dead. This usually takes longer than carbon dioxide, and I don't recommend them because of the chemicals that you have to use, but some people prefer them because they put the bird to sleep before killing it. The ether and chloroform methods put the birds to sleep and then kill them with an overdose. I never get used to killing things, but sometimes it is the best thing that you can do for a bird.

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#18460 - 05/13/03 03:24 PM Re: cull by neck pulling?
Bill Ludwig Offline
Classroom Professor

Registered: 07/17/02
Posts: 2582
Loc: Ohio
rokimoto

Thanks for the suggestions. I may have to put one down soon myself. This one being a pet, it would be hard to ax. I dont get so close to the ones I know are bound for the freezer.

Bill

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#18461 - 05/13/03 03:55 PM Re: cull by neck pulling?
Anonymous
Unregistered


Dry ice, that sounds easy enough.

Today I brought home this year's chicks. My daughter gave our sick leghorn some of the medicated starter, and she began to gobble it up!?! I have given her a few more days, as she has only been on the antibiotics a short while. In talking with many people, some seem to think that leghorns can be disposed to arthritis and other skeletal problems. If this is the case, and we are not dealing with a disease, I may put her back, and see how she fairs with the others. If that's a bad situation for her, then she must go. This bird has been the only confusing one, and made up for the lack of oddities in the others.

Thanks Bill for your support. I've really appreciated it. Sorry to hear about your pet bird too. I know you are a good owner, and love your animals. I know any animal of yours had a good life. Sorry if you have to go through with it. frown
Thanks for the dry ice idea, Rokimoto. I bet I could do that.

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#18462 - 05/13/03 05:04 PM Re: cull by neck pulling?
Anonymous
Unregistered


Dry ice.... great idea for pet chickens!! I hate hacking or wringing pets.. gruesome!!

You say you can get it at Walmart.. really? Wow!! I am really beginning to think you can get EVERYTHING at Walmart. laugh

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#18463 - 05/13/03 05:14 PM Re: cull by neck pulling?
Anonymous
Unregistered


Henny, I think any place with a meat department has it. I'll get mine at Fred Meyer.

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#18464 - 05/13/03 10:52 PM Re: cull by neck pulling?
Anonymous
Unregistered


Interesting... I called the Mart d'Wal wink and they acted like I was a looney.. well I am normally :p but I figured since Doc O had said it was so then for sure the folks at Walmart would not think I was nuts for asking. But as far as they were concerned I might well have been speaking Basque. Bet I just got someone on the phone who didn't have a clue.

I will call around... I know we have a local company that sells it in pellet form but I might have to buy 100 gross or some outlandish number.

Dry ice is not something that I normally would even think about but it is a great idea for humane killing.. Thanks Dr. Okimoto.

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#18465 - 06/02/03 01:11 PM Re: cull by neck pulling?
Anonymous
Unregistered


I have had to put down a few to and the most human way to do it seems like an air tight cage behind the tail pipe, they just fall asleep and don't wake up

I'm sorry I'v lost pet birds before.

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#18466 - 06/02/03 08:34 PM Re: cull by neck pulling?
Anonymous
Unregistered


Well... I took Dr. Okimoto's advice and it worked very well. Very quick and totally humane.

This is exactly what I did.

We had a couple of old pet hens who it turned out had "hardware" disease, they had swallowed some plastic. Have no idea where it came from.. guess they found it when free ranging. They had been suffering so we knew it was time. But I didn't want to hatchet them and wringing their neck would have been very difficult due to their size.

I took a large Rubbermaid storage box w/ lid that is almost completely air tight. I cut a piece of peg board (since it has holes in it) and cut it to make a divider for the box (you don't want the chicken coming in contact with the dry ice). I took a piece of dry ice (probably about 3 lbs) and placed it in the smaller side of the divided box and then "primed" the dry ice by poaring a cup of water on it, then putting the lid on. I waited for a couple minutes for the CO2 to accumulate in the box (it is heavier than air so it accumulates at the bottomm of the box and will eventually push out all the lighter air) I then placed the chicken calmly in the other side of the box and put the lid on. There was a couple of chirps and 1 small thump about 15 seconds later and that was it. I kept the lid on for 10 minutes to insure they had breathed in enough CO2 to die. No blood, no stress. They simply looked like they had gone to sleep. Really as peaceful as killing can be in my opinion.

This is so much less stressful for the chicken. I will use this method for all my killing, whether pet, cull, or broiler from now on.

Thank you Dr. Okimoto

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