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#20299 - 01/16/08 03:49 PM Gangrene? *with Pictures*
Zuzy Offline
Chicken

Registered: 07/26/05
Posts: 107
Loc: Massachusetts
I've hunted around the web trying to find information on gangrene in chickens, and have not found as much I would hope to.

One of my Japanese roosters had some frostbite damage to his comb and wattles a week and a half ago, and I had decided to wait it out and let the dead parts fall off like we did last year when he had this same problem. But I noticed yesterday that he has some troubling green coloration on the affected parts, and now I'm very afraid it's gangrene.


So my question is, is this gangrene? And if so, what should I do now? I've seen that dubbing seems to be one of the only options besides waiting it out. This rooster is one of our favorites, and I would hate to see him slowly succumb to gangrene.... But we have no experience in dubbing, and I don't know if I'll be able to afford to take him to the vet. What should I do now?

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#20300 - 01/16/08 04:04 PM Re: Gangrene? *with Pictures*
Anonymous
Unregistered


I don't know much about the frost bite or gangrene. I wouldn't think that an already full grown rooster could be dubbed.. But, I'm new to chickens. It could be done I guess.

In one of the pictures to roos beak crosses, is that normal? Or does a chicken actually need maintenance beak trimming? Like I said, I'm fairly young with chickens. Just curious. Asking questions, gain knowledge.

I hope your roo does just fine.

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#20301 - 01/16/08 07:32 PM Re: Gangrene? *with Pictures*
Zuzy Offline
Chicken

Registered: 07/26/05
Posts: 107
Loc: Massachusetts
He hatched with a crossed beak, which isn't uncommon but it's not normal. Chickens beaks sometimes do need to be trimmed, but their beaks won't cross if you don't. As far as I know that only happens if there's a developmental problem in the egg.

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#20302 - 01/16/08 08:12 PM Re: Gangrene? *with Pictures*
Anonymous
Unregistered


hehe. Shows you how much I know. Does it affect him at all? Eating or drinking? Just curious.

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#20303 - 01/16/08 08:51 PM Re: Gangrene? *with Pictures*
Jrsygntbrdr1 Offline
Classroom Professor

Registered: 06/12/05
Posts: 2601
Loc: Arkansas
It should make it a bit more difficult to pick up single grains off of the ground, but if using a grain holder (24-hour pan feeder with depth) it makes it easier on the bird to eat.

I'm not too worried about the yellow parts as it is dead tissue and looks like what dying tissue on the comb and wattles should look like (at least when my birds have had it). I am a bit worried about the greenish tinge on the back of the comb. Is it green or is it a trick of the camera?

If it is determined that it is gangrene, and that's the only part on the bird I'm even the least bit worried about, you can use different things. You can use ice to "deaden" the area before cutting. I don't mean it kills the tissue but it slows blood flow in the area and can decrease bleeding. If you'd rather be sure, you can use some of the wart-remover stuff. It is a mixture of liquid nitrogen, butane and other cold gases. It says not to place on skin until 15 seconds after saturating the sponge. In his case, you don't have to wait the 15 seconds because you want the blood to decrease and to deaden the tissue around it. That's what the warning label is for. It is so that you don't stick the gas mixture on your skin and deaden it or the nerves and blood flow in the area.

Do you use the rooster for breeding? Cross-beak is hereditary and can be passed to offspring.

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#20304 - 01/17/08 08:11 AM Re: Gangrene? *with Pictures*
Zuzy Offline
Chicken

Registered: 07/26/05
Posts: 107
Loc: Massachusetts
He's not a breeding bird, no. he is just fine eating and drinking. We need to trim the end of his beak at times because if the top beak gets too long it makes it harder for him to eat. But he's almost three years old and has had no problems eating.

The green looks just like that in real life, which is why it has me bothered. It was yellow before, which didn't bother me, but has turned that color in the past couple of days.

If it is gangrene, will it fall off with the dead tissue or will it eventually spread to other parts of his body?

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#20305 - 01/17/08 09:26 AM Re: Gangrene? *with Pictures*
Jrsygntbrdr1 Offline
Classroom Professor

Registered: 06/12/05
Posts: 2601
Loc: Arkansas
Gangrene is an infection and will eventually spread to other parts of his body. It looks as though it's localized right now if it is gangrene, but I just can't be sure. Could you do a search to look for human gangrene? I mean, if it states signs and symptoms in humans, you may be able to relate it to what you've seen on the bird. I'll admit, it's not my favorite color on the bird by far. Can you tell if it's just a scab on that part? It looks like there's red coloring underneath the green part. You could attempt to "scrape" off that part and see if there's blood. Being an infection a yellowish liquid should come out if the infection is spreading. If you catch it beforehand he may just have to lose part of his comb rather than his life.

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#20306 - 01/17/08 09:34 AM Re: Gangrene? *with Pictures*
Jrsygntbrdr1 Offline
Classroom Professor

Registered: 06/12/05
Posts: 2601
Loc: Arkansas
Sorry! Gangrene can be caused by an infection is what I meant to put. It actually looks as though yours was/is because the comb was already "injured" before it set it...the frostbite. Anyway, thought I'd clear that up. Since it was probably an infection that caused the gangrene to come up you may want to treat it with care. (If you pick the scab off use disposable latex gloves so that none of it gets on you...for that just in case factor...)

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#20307 - 01/17/08 02:29 PM Re: Gangrene? *with Pictures*
Zuzy Offline
Chicken

Registered: 07/26/05
Posts: 107
Loc: Massachusetts
I had looked up images of human gangrene, and had looked for symptoms. Some things fit, other things didn't, and none of the images I saw seemed quite the same green color, but that doesn't really rule it out anyway. I'm afraid I'll have to end up going with the wait and see method. It's worked other times with my chicken's maladies; they tend to be less alarming than I initially think they are, either that or I just catch them early enough. I hate waiting it out though.

Thanks for the suggestions. I guess we'll see what happens.

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#20308 - 01/17/08 02:49 PM Re: Gangrene? *with Pictures*
Jrsygntbrdr1 Offline
Classroom Professor

Registered: 06/12/05
Posts: 2601
Loc: Arkansas
Good luck, hopefully it'll work out. Then again, the gangrene could just cause more comb to fall off than expected. I had dubbing birds and only do it if it is absolutely necessary (birds comb gets completely torn up because of fighting, caught in fence and other birds won't leave it alone because it's tattered and fun to play with...etc.)

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