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#39553 - 01/13/03 04:33 AM Pedagogical Photos
Anonymous
Unregistered


First of all, I thank everyone who has offered me photos of poultry. Perhaps now the iron is hot and the time is right to put together a pedagogical photo set.

What we would like to have is a set of photos that illustrate the effects of certain genes and gene combinations on chick down and male and female adults (the effect on males is often not the same as for females).

In order to cut down on the chances of introducing inaccuracies, I would need some help in genotyping the phenotypes - Ron, Caveny, others ... would you be willing to be 'referees', in the academic sense, for an effort like this?

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#39554 - 01/13/03 12:18 PM Re: Pedagogical Photos
Anonymous
Unregistered


Hi Leee,
Iím not sure if this will help but sometime in March I will be receiving day old Marans. If memory serves I think they are sex link .I ordered all pullets . If pictures will help you out let me know. I have a Sony digital and a new computer that I can make cds of the pictures on. I could mail them are if its easer put them on our web site and you could copy them.
Take care Nan
I forgot that I will also be getting straight run Barnevelders sometime this year also.

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#39555 - 01/16/03 04:01 PM Re: Pedagogical Photos
Anonymous
Unregistered


been away for a while but would offer pics if i could figure out how to get them on line somewhere. my birds are mixed garbage so i doubt if this will be of any help what ever you are doing.

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#39556 - 01/16/03 08:38 PM Re: Pedagogical Photos
Anonymous
Unregistered


incubator...to post your pictures you need to find a hosting website. I use boomspeed but it cost $6. a month. There are free ones out there but you have to be selective since some won't allow you to link from them.

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#39557 - 01/16/03 08:47 PM Re: Pedagogical Photos
R. Okimoto Offline
Lord of the Fowl

Registered: 07/18/02
Posts: 1498
Loc: Arkansas
I just got back from California. Chicken is doing fairly well as a research organism. One of the plenary talks used chickens as an outgroup for comparison with humans and mice in order to discover new genes and characterized others. The Chinese claim that they will have a big chunk of the genome sequenced in four months. It may not be available to all researchers. The US effort will have the shotgun sequence around August of this year, and will be available to everyone around the world, so we won't have long to wait to get our hands on the genome sequence of chickens. Once we have the sequence the real work begins. They are still working on the human and mouse genomes to clean them up, so it will take a while to everything together.

I'll look at the pictures and help where I can, but it is difficult to tell a lot by pictures. The McMurray catalog has some pictures that I'd disagree accurately reflect what the chicks really look like. The Fayoumi is one of the worst examples. The down should be a deep rich purple brown color with marbling. You don't get that from the pictures. All the Salmon Faverolles that I have seen had clean cream down. I don't know why they show chicks with a back stripe. It may just be dark down that the picture makes look like a stripe.

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#39558 - 01/17/03 07:39 AM Re: Pedagogical Photos
Anonymous
Unregistered


Would you let us know when the genome map is available and from where? Will it be presented in a way that is understandable (Bl, pg+, W) or will it use some other way to represent genes?

About the McMurray photos; do redcaps have the back striping, but not head striping because they are spangles? Also, my black and blue silkies hatch with no white on them whatsoever. All the black breeds shown have white on them. What do mine have that others don't?

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#39559 - 01/23/03 07:40 AM Re: Pedagogical Photos
Manok Offline
Coop Keeper

Registered: 12/20/02
Posts: 638
Loc: Netherlands
Leee, you can take my pics of the two chicks featured in the coop's topic
http://www.the-coop.org/cgi-bin/UBB/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=3;t=000252
and use them on your great site.

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#39560 - 01/23/03 11:27 AM Re: Pedagogical Photos
R. Okimoto Offline
Lord of the Fowl

Registered: 07/18/02
Posts: 1498
Loc: Arkansas
The chicken genome will likely not be in a usable format for the public for several years, and then most of the genes that you are interested in will not be on the map. Once we have the sequence the various genes have to be identified and then years of reasearch will go into trying to figure out what all 30,000 genes do. One of these days (years from now) you will be able to go and find any gene that you are interested in and see where it is and what genetic variants exist. To a limited extent you can already do this for the human genome.

Do a web search for NCBI. From the NCBI home page you can access the human genome database. Using the various databases you can look up specific genes and find out where they are and what they do. You can test it out by trying a gene like tyrosinase (the chicken C locus or recessive white) or melanocortin 1-receptor (MC1-R or MC1R, the chicken E locus). You can find out what human chromosome these genes are on and you can be directed to the various databases that will tell you what the gene does and possible mutations of the gene that have been characterized. In humans some mutations of the MC1-R gene have been associated with red and blond hair. Just like chickens have black, brown and wheaten alleles. Mutants of the human tyrosinase gene are associated with one type of albinism. So feather color genes do about the same thing in people except affect skin, hair and tissue pigmentation. We identified the possible gene for dominant white by comparing fur color mutations in mammals and the genes associated with them to the chicken genes. It turns out that dominant white may be caused by the same gene that causes the black to silver phenotype in mice (pmel the mouse silver locus).

Eventually we hope that all genomes will be annotated like this. It will take a while, but one day your descendants will have a much easier and, hopefully, more interesting time breeding chickens in their backyards.

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#39561 - 01/25/03 09:30 AM Re: Pedagogical Photos
Anonymous
Unregistered


"Also, my black and blue silkies hatch with no white on them whatsoever. All the black breeds shown have white on them. What do mine have that others don't? "
buddy this is probably not what you are looking for , but the black chicks with white (penguins) are "pied". in chickens this look does not last as they grow the black color grows into the white areas until the mature bird shows only black. look at pied peacock and guinea adn duck they all have the white belly /wing parts and dark back going on. these pied will never fill in in these species.

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