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#42351 - 08/12/02 03:32 PM Re: hatching in a home built forced air incubator
Anonymous
Unregistered


Here! here! dito Rob..! This has been an interesting topic and while I don't understand all of it, I think it's informative to view more than one opinion.. maybe we could email the moderator??

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#42352 - 08/12/02 03:56 PM Re: hatching in a home built forced air incubator
D. Caveny Offline
Ruler of the Roost

Registered: 07/16/02
Posts: 1102
Loc: Arizona
At the risk of enraging many....I am not one to debate on the RRS issue..as far as I am concerned the major breeders have already had the trial over the last 40 years and rejected any arguments that RRS is anything but a waste of money. Remember Art Heisdorf rode the horse for years before finally admitting that it was a failure. If they didn't they would be using the method. Remember the university crowd has no money riding on the debate while the breeders have their existance!

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#42353 - 08/12/02 11:38 PM Re: hatching in a home built forced air incubator
BC Breeder Offline
Coop Keeper

Registered: 07/16/02
Posts: 434
Loc: Canada
>>>>>>>>At the risk of enraging many....I am not one to debate on the RRS issue..as far as I am concerned the major breeders have already had the trial over the last 40 years and rejected any arguments that RRS is anything but a waste of money.

enraged? naahhhhh, a bit of pity maybe, but definately not enraged. Often failures are followed by successes once the reasons for the failures are understood. The fundamental basis of RRS is sound and basic common sense, it's just not always practiced in a suitable or effective way. Alot of advances have been made in understanding poultry selection methods since the late 70s and early 80s, this enlightenment would have an affect on how a breeder might use RRS. More than one way to use the RRS concept, wouldn't you agree? Even the bible of many in this community (Crawford 1990) isn't willing to dismiss the effectiveness of the RRS concept. And please don't suggest that the topic doesn't interest you, you cared enough to initiate the discussion in an off topic thread.
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#42354 - 08/13/02 04:53 AM Re: hatching in a home built forced air incubator
Graciel Offline
Coop Keeper

Registered: 07/18/02
Posts: 423
Loc: New York
BC, I have a digital hygrometer rather like yours and mine is off by 10 points, so I'd advise you to get a good wetbulb so you can compare them. I use my digital all the time, but I know when the darn thing says 55% it really means 65%! I was pretty disgusted when I found this out, but once you know, you can use them. Takes the fun out of it, though.

I've had some sticky poults this year, as well, and what bugs me about them is I'll get them in the same hatch with poults that are perfectly normal. I have trouble assigning the problem to humidity at this point, but don't know where else to go with the problem.

Jennifer

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#42355 - 08/14/02 08:12 AM Re: hatching in a home built forced air incubator
BC Breeder Offline
Coop Keeper

Registered: 07/16/02
Posts: 434
Loc: Canada
Well, by the time I woke up yesterday, day 21, the hatch was complete. Last night, I transferred then to their sand box. 4 of the 5 remaining araucana eggs had hatched and 13 of the 15 easter egg crosses had hatched. Interestingly, all eggs marked with a C for being cracked and/or dented had hatched, maybe I shouldn't have tossed the ones that had bloody cracks?

All but one araucana are nice and fully fluffed, just like they come from the hatchery or from under the mother hen. A far cry from my first attempt when many would still have crusty down. and took almost the whole first week to get that fully fluffed look. Of the 3 eggs that didn't hatch, one had been dead for about a week and the other two went full term before dying. Neither had pipped their shells.

Whether protecting the hatching eggs from the fan's breeze with the towel actually helped? I dunno, this is just one observation and the increased success may have also come from the change in humidity management tactics. Nevertheless, it may be an observation worth noting and attempting to duplicate.

Personally, I feel it makes intuitive sense. Naturally hatched chicks don't hatch under a blow dryer, they are hatched with much protection from breezes. Even though it's warm air, the circulating air would have a chilling effect on the chick. It would have a dehydrating effect as well. Protecting the hatching chicks from the breeze of a forced air incubator can't hurt, IMO. I also noted that the fluffed up chicks preferred sitting on the towel to the wire rack.
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#42356 - 08/14/02 08:20 AM Re: hatching in a home built forced air incubator
BC Breeder Offline
Coop Keeper

Registered: 07/16/02
Posts: 434
Loc: Canada
>>>>>I use my digital all the time, but I know when the darn thing says 55% it really means 65%! I was pretty disgusted when I found this out, but once you know, you can use them.

Jennifer, yeah I doubt the accuracy of mine as well. But the important thing is that it seems to be consistent and therefore I can work with it. Compared with a couple of mercury thermometers, the thermometer portion of the digital seems highly accurate, even though the inside and outside probes never read the same.

However, I should grab a wetbulb to compare the REAL numbers to the digital numbers. This digital won't last forever and I would hate to have to start from scratch after finding out what setting work best in my setup.
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#42357 - 08/14/02 09:25 AM Re: hatching in a home built forced air incubator
Aram Seattle Offline
Coop Keeper

Registered: 07/16/02
Posts: 547
Loc: Washington
As far as the towel I agree. My brooder is nothing more than a huge brown towel in a shape of a vigwam, with a heating pad under the towel - all in a big box. I think that a warm towel is close to a feel of a hen, though I do have to change it often when it becomes soiled.

I put the chicks in there 10 minutes after they hatch and begin playing football with the rest of the eggs. The fibers on the towel seem to dry and wipe them off clean in about 1.5 hours.

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