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#50674 - 03/13/04 01:47 AM The breeds created by Martin Silverudd
Norwegian Offline
Coop Keeper

Registered: 08/31/03
Posts: 523
Loc: Norway
The following is a translation of an article written by Bengt Mattson and published in "Hanegallet" - the magazine of the Swedish Landhen club (SLK) in the autumn of 2002. The responsibility for the translation is mine as well as any faults or misunderstandings resulting.

This a link to the SLK: Svenska Lanthonsklubben

Another link to a site with photos of three of the Silverudd-breeds: Isbar, Queen Silvia and Fifyfive Flowery

THE SILVERUDD-BREEDS

by Bengt Mattson

Maybe an article on some slightly different chickens could be of interest to the magazine readers, and primarily to those occupied with the raising of chickens and egg-production.
The breed "Fiftyfive-Flowery" is a very good layer of large, white eggs. It is auto-sexing as day-old, which makes it extra interesting for those who want to hatch chicks for eggproduction. The drawback is that the only hatchery that has the breed, doesn't sell any roosters. But for those who keep a small flock for the eggs, it would be an extra benefit that the hens are good-looking. That is the case with these breeds.

Siverudd's ideas

Some years ago, I wrote about them in "Hanegallet". If you missed it, it might be interesting to know a little of these chickens.

Martin Silverudd had ideas of developing the breeding of chickens and got to know quite a loy about genetics. His aims were:

1. to get auto-sexing chicks for high-yielding breeds/strains i.e. Leghorn

2. to change roosters at close intervals and still be able to know the sire of the chicks.

3. with the help of the eggshell-color, to be able to know which hen was the dam of the chicks.

4. to get light breeds as Leghorn to lay brown eggs etc.

Rare
Some of the breeds still exist, but the number of strains are extremly low. It would be nice if more breeders would help to preserve these breeds.

Fiftyfive Flowery
is the oldest of the breeds. It was ready in 1955, and is a mottled (mille-fleur? Transl. note) which explains the name.It is a rather big chicken, bred from old strains of Leghorn i.e. Overlida. It lays large, white eggs. Keep this in mind when you purchase eggs, as there is some marketing of rather small, tinted eggs, claimed to come from "FF". The chicks are autosexing and worth looking at. Male chicks are greyish white/yellow without barring, while the female chicks are barred. As grown-ups the pullets are like Legbar, but mottled, while the roosters are all-white with a few grey smudges. There is also a "gold" variant.

Smaaland chickens
were created from white Leghorn with a few percent of Rhode Island Reds or New Hampshire crossed in. The incrossing is done to make the breed lay light brown eggs. They are large and oblong. Even the "Smaaland" is autosexing as day-olds, but not as completly as "Fiftyfive Flowery" as you get a few questionable cases. The pullets look like Legbar, while the roosters are grey barred with silver neck and saddle. "Smaalands" often go broody and most are well-suited as cluck-hens. Inbreeding is probably the reason for hatchability not being as high as one could wish for.

Queen Silvia
is bred from a cross between white Leghorn and Rhode Island Reds. The pullets are characteristically barred all over, except for the neck which is white. Roosters are almost white with some markings in wings, saddle and the otherwise black tail. The patternis believed to be a mutation from white Leghorn. The chicks are very special - almost looking like gull-chicks. "QS" lay brown eggs of an average size. Some hens go broody and the ones that do, are very good cluck-hens and mothers.

Molilja
is somewhat smaller than white Leghorns, but still almost to 100% a variant of that breed. It is yellow-brown in colour. Some pullets have brown or black marking (pencilling) on the back. Molilja lay white or slightly tinted eggs. Chicks are yellow with black spots and lines on the head. Some hens go broody.

Isbar
is a chickenbreed made from Rhode Island, but some genes are exchanged, so that it is "silver" and barred. The parts that are black in RIR, are barred in Isbar. Some of the hens has the gene for blue eggs bred in and so lay green eggs. Because if you cross in the gene for blue egg (called O) in breeds that lay white eggs, the eggs from the offspring will be blue, but crossed to brown-egg layers they will be green.

There is another variant, called Isbar blue, which is very beautiful. In blue variants some animals turn out black, some turn out blue, and some turn out white with a grey touch. When they also have "gold" in neck and saddle, you have a very beautiful flock. Most lay mossgreen eggs.

The article also gives Bengt Mattsons adress and phone number, for those wanting additional information. As I haven't asked his permission - I don't feel free to give out that information publicly.

Norwegian

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#50675 - 03/15/04 02:43 AM Re: The breeds created by Martin Silverudd
KazJaps Offline
Classroom Professor

Registered: 08/30/02
Posts: 2807
Loc: Australia
Thank you Norwegian. An interesting read. smile

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#50676 - 03/15/04 09:05 AM Re: The breeds created by Martin Silverudd
Anonymous
Unregistered


Thanks, Norwegian. There are so many possibilities with breeding chickens! I'm a little surprised that more has not been done with producing auto-sexing chickens - but then I know NOTHING about the intricacies involved. KazJaps, is there an Australian site that I could go to to find out the different breeds available here in Oz? and who from? I would be most interested.

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#50677 - 03/15/04 10:44 AM Re: The breeds created by Martin Silverudd
D. Caveny Offline
Ruler of the Roost

Registered: 07/16/02
Posts: 1102
Loc: Arizona
Correction on genetics of the 55-Flowery Leghorn bred by Sture Svensson (Eskjo, Sweden) and myself. Sture has always had the 55-Flowery in Silver at his farm since 1955 (Martin bred them on Sture's farm). I have bred the birds since 1994 (my stock came from Sture). The genetics of the 55-Flowery is B/B, S/S, k+/k+, e+/e+, mo/mo. The males are blotchy at hatch while the females look just like a chipmunk striped Light Brown Leghorn chick. The adult males are mostly white with very few flecks of black in the feathers (at first they appear to be White Leghorns). The hens look very much like a Legbar but have more white in the feathers caused by the mottling gene. According to conversations with Sture....the gold version may have never existed, only in theory. I have photos of chicks and adults if anyone would like to post them. The photos of the blue birds posted by the Norwegian club are not the 55-Flowery Leghorn that Sture and I have.....ours are not now nor were they ever blue! The reason autosexing birds did not become popular is that hatcheries were developing the franchise system about the time Martin developed the 55-Flowery. Hatcheries would not want customers breeding birds to compete with them so of course they did not want autosexing fowl which are easily identifed as male or female at hatch. Also, many autosexing birds like Cambar and Legbar were bred from show chickens which had no production genes in their genome. Therefore, they could not compete with real production fowl produced by Kimber, Dryden, Mt Hope and others at the time.

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#50678 - 03/15/04 10:52 AM Re: The breeds created by Martin Silverudd
Norwegian Offline
Coop Keeper

Registered: 08/31/03
Posts: 523
Loc: Norway
Thanks for the input, Caveny. I just translated and posted what Bengt Mattson wrote. The 2nd link (Isbar, Queen Silvia and Fifyfive Flowery) is to a person in Sweden - not necessarily "authorised". I think just the one with the arrow will be FF! She writes that she has just two FFs, one gold and one silver. The blue ones might be blue Isbars?

Gotta go, but I'll check in again later.

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#50679 - 03/15/04 05:47 PM Re: The breeds created by Martin Silverudd
Anonymous
Unregistered


Would someone please translate/explain what the
"B/B, S/s, k+/k+, e+/e+, mo/mo" is or stands for.
Thanks

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#50680 - 03/15/04 06:04 PM Re: The breeds created by Martin Silverudd
D. Caveny Offline
Ruler of the Roost

Registered: 07/16/02
Posts: 1102
Loc: Arizona
SORRY,
The 55-Flowery Leghorn has the following sex-linked genes
1. Sex-linked Barring (B);
2. Sex-linked Silver (S);
3. Sex-linked Fast-feathering (k+).
Males have 2 of each of these genes because they have 2 Z chromosomes. Females have only 1 dose of each of these genes on a single Z chromosome and 1 w chromosome. The dosage difference of B/B, S/S of the males makes the day-old male chick much lighter than the female which has only one dose of B/-w, S/-w on the wild type (e+/e+) and mottled (mo/mo) baby chick color.

It also has the following autosomal genes:
1. e+/e+ (wild type)[chipmunk stripe] Brown Leghorn Coloring;
2. mo/mo recessive mottling.

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#50681 - 03/16/04 01:39 AM Re: The breeds created by Martin Silverudd
Norwegian Offline
Coop Keeper

Registered: 08/31/03
Posts: 523
Loc: Norway
confused The article by Bengt Mattson was accompanied by two photos he had taken (one of Queen Silvias and one of Moliljas). I have now scanned them to jpg-files, but the problem is I don't know how to get them posted in this thread??? I don't have a web-page to put them in or anything.
Any suggestions?
confused frown

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#50682 - 03/16/04 05:42 PM Re: The breeds created by Martin Silverudd
KazJaps Offline
Classroom Professor

Registered: 08/30/02
Posts: 2807
Loc: Australia
Caveny & Norwegian,

I can upload the photos if you wish & post them here. Just email the photos to:
kazballea@ezweb.com.au

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#50683 - 03/18/04 02:00 PM Re: The breeds created by Martin Silverudd
KazJaps Offline
Classroom Professor

Registered: 08/30/02
Posts: 2807
Loc: Australia
Here are the photos from Norwegian:

Queen Silvia


Molilja



---------------------

Edit: 2009 - Updated photo links

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