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#52694 - 07/18/03 07:30 PM Broody Hamburg
Rob2 Offline
Classroom Professor

Registered: 03/28/03
Posts: 3068
Loc: Pennsylvania
Something new for me. I have had a L.F black hamburg hen go broody! The bantams set but never had a large go broody. She is not a old hen either. I,m almost tempted to give her some eggs and see what goes. I would like a broody line os hams.

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#52695 - 07/22/03 06:22 AM Re: Broody Hamburg
Anonymous
Unregistered


What are hamburg chickens. confused

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#52696 - 07/22/03 06:40 AM Re: Broody Hamburg
Anonymous
Unregistered


A hamburg is a breed of chicken developed in Hamburg, Germany.

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#52697 - 07/22/03 08:41 AM Re: Broody Hamburg
Rob2 Offline
Classroom Professor

Registered: 03/28/03
Posts: 3068
Loc: Pennsylvania
Hamburgs are one of the earliest of chicken breeds and parent stock of most rosecom breeds. They were shown at taverns in Britain several hundred years ago and were once called pheasant fowl. Another name is Hollands Hoens. A common misconception is they were developed in hamburg germany. They were developed in holland and improved in England. They were exported via Hamburg ger., thus the name. There are 6 standard varieties in both bantam and large fowl. I could go on!and on!

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#52698 - 07/22/03 08:43 AM Re: Broody Hamburg
Rob2 Offline
Classroom Professor

Registered: 03/28/03
Posts: 3068
Loc: Pennsylvania
What I forgot to mention: they are a non setting breed, that is why I was surprised to have a broody hen. A friend has several broody hams of the spangled variety. It is uncommon.

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#52699 - 07/22/03 10:35 AM Re: Broody Hamburg
CJR Online   content
Coop Master

Registered: 07/16/02
Posts: 8489
Loc: Montana
Rob, If you want broody Hamburgs, indeed set HER eggs. Some of the females she produces, may indeed become broodies, but probably not all of the females.

I prefer to hen-hatch and in most cases I keep pullets from my best hens that are setters--so over the years, I now have very few hens that do not set at least twice a year--some 3x.

I have been working with MilleFleur Dutch and for the first two generations, only one hen set. Now, I have two of her pullets that set this spring, and hatched! Theirs will be the only female chicks that I will keep for the next generation. And I guess that keeping males for breeding, out of those setter females, could be a good thing, also??

Actually, I believe setter-bantam hens may be longer producers, as they take a rest from laying regularly, to rejuvinate their systems!

Now I have two Buff Brahma Bantam females, for setters. They started laying in February. One began to set end of May. She hatched 2 batches, back to back, and has now just begun to lay again. The other pullet has never stopped laying (cannot get really good shells any more) and never set--lays almost every day. I am not hatching Brahmas, but the one female is not being useful for me--except for that nice big breakfast egg. (but I have dozens of smaller Dutch eggs for all kinds of recipes!)

I would go for the Hamburg setter!! And good luck with her-- not too much disturbance-even moving her might be touchy! CJR

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#52700 - 07/22/03 11:01 AM Re: Broody Hamburg
Rob2 Offline
Classroom Professor

Registered: 03/28/03
Posts: 3068
Loc: Pennsylvania
I am thinking about trying for the broody hams. I am not a very dedicated incubator guy any more. Just dont have the interest any more. I used to have good bator hatches in years past.
Lousy experience today. 1 of 24 hen set eggs hatched. They were shipped in eggs(s.p. hamburg bantams)probably would not have hatched even the 1 in a bator. Well, I hope it is a male and survives, at least I can start a breeding program with plenty of heterosis.

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#52701 - 07/25/03 03:26 AM Re: Broody Hamburg
KazJaps Offline
Classroom Professor

Registered: 08/30/02
Posts: 2807
Loc: Australia
I’ve often thought it would be an interesting study looking into how much genetic influence & how much environmental influence goes into making a good broody hen.

I bought 3 d’Uccle hens 18 months ago, which were hatched/raised artificially & kept permanently on wire-floored pens as adults. Eggs were collected daily. The hens never went broody with the previous owner (no surprise there). One hen (Lavender Mottled) I kept in a pen with a roo from the same line, plus another unrelated hen. The unrelated hen set a clutch of eggs, hatched a dozen chicks. I kept them all in the same large pen. Within a fortnight, both the Lav Mottled hen & roo were helping in the rearing of the chicks. Quite cute seeing chickens huddled under a roo. The Lav Mottled hen became fully broody (clucking), without laying a single egg. One other of the original 3 hens became broody after about a year. This coincided again with putting her in a pen with other unrelated hens that had become broody while she was there. The 3rd hen was kept in a pen only with a roo from the same line. She has never gone broody. But, her 1st daughter (raised by an unrelated hen) went broody after laying the 1st clutch.

I also have one Sebright hen that is a good mum, coming from a line where the hens go broody. I’ve used Japanese Bantam roos on two occasions in the past year, to raise approx. 1-month-old chickens, on their own. They keep the chicks warm at night, teach the young ones how to forage for food & teach them basic survival techniques (very important with free range birds). Pick the right parent(s) & you’ll have the perfect socialised young ones.

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#52702 - 08/30/03 03:59 PM Re: Broody Hamburg
Anonymous
Unregistered


Update.
Rob sold the LF hams to me Aug 9th. Today the hen went broody again. I had been collecting the eggs. Well, I will let her set. I have marked all eggs. They were kept in the fridge. She will have 6 of them to set, plus todays egg.
Now we will see
A.) How well LF Hams set
B.) How good they are as mothers
C.) How well refrigerator eggs hatch
D.) How well following generations set

I'll keep you all posted.

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#52703 - 08/30/03 06:19 PM Re: Broody Hamburg
Anonymous
Unregistered


Well, my mistake. The darn things all look alike. I had already had one egg today. so figured that girl #2 was broody after sitting in the box all afternoon. Kept looking in on her and seeing her in the box. Went in again tonight, no hen, but 2 more eggs. So I must have had a 3rd hen laying. Good news, but broody hen would have been better...oh well.

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