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#55962 - 03/30/04 10:18 AM Egg Storage for incubation?
Anonymous
Unregistered


Hi all,

I have a question about storing eggs that you want to incubate. In what temp. range must the eggs be stored while I am waiting to collect the amount of eggs I want to incubate? Any ideas on where to store them? (I'm thinking the fridge is too cold and the kitchen counter may be too hot some times of the year.

Thanks!

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#55963 - 03/30/04 11:59 AM Re: Egg Storage for incubation?
Debgk Offline
Coop Cleaner

Registered: 12/23/03
Posts: 184
Loc: Massachusetts
Hey Gingit,

whose eggs??

here's a link that might help ... duck health- hatching eggs

One thing is says there:

Quote:
Egg storage. If eggs are stored for a while before they are set, they should be stored at a temperature and humidity level that will minimize deterioration of the egg. For a small number of eggs, storage in a cellar may suffice. Store eggs at about 55F (13C) and 75% relative humidity whenever possible. Store eggs small end down.

good luck!! happy incubating!!!

deb

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#55964 - 03/30/04 07:12 PM Re: Egg Storage for incubation?
Anonymous
Unregistered


Hi deb!

They're Pennelope's eggs (my Rouen). If she doesn't start setting after she lays another clutch I may just start collecting them to incubate. We'll see... she just doesn't seem to be getting down to business - although she is sitting on the nest more often these past few days since they got their own pen so who knows. At one point she had 18 eggs under her! I'm going ot take them all out tomorrow (except the one she laid today) and let her start over. I was hoping to have ducklings by my birthday in late April... laugh

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#55965 - 03/31/04 09:17 AM Re: Egg Storage for incubation?
Debgk Offline
Coop Cleaner

Registered: 12/23/03
Posts: 184
Loc: Massachusetts
Quote:
I was hoping to have ducklings by my birthday in late April
Hey Gingit,

you could always get some fertile eggs and try those ... maybe???

Happy early Birthday!

deb

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#55966 - 04/02/04 03:51 AM Re: Egg Storage for incubation?
Anonymous
Unregistered


Hi all, Gingit, I've also heard the cellar is the best place for storage of fertile eggs. Good article Deb. I'd read that after two weeks of storage, they are no longer fertile. The article mentioned cloudiness in candling, calling it dead germ, (?) though I'm thinking they're still fine to eat. I'm wondering approximately when they are no longer suitable for eating, since I've scrambled some for our dogs and they absolutely love them, especially our new pup.

I have been saving a few to just dry out and keep in my buffet for display, but I'm actually afraid to barely touch them for fear they'll explode.

We candled some of Julia's eggs and saw the yolk floating around but no veins. We may be giving a couple to my son's class to hatch at school - they're getting an incubator. Oh - can you hatch duck eggs in the same incubator as chicken eggs or are the temperature requirements different?
Gingit - I hope you got a picture of your hen with all those eggs under her! Sounds so sweet, but must be frustrating.

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#55967 - 04/02/04 07:00 AM Re: Egg Storage for incubation?
Anonymous
Unregistered


Hi mare and deb,

Well she is sitting like a maniac these days -she's really into it now - hardly off the nest as far as I can see, so I am hopeful. I candled the eggs the other night and saw in each except the newest, a dark black dot floating around in a cloud that was the yolk, so again I am hopeful. ANd no idications that the egg is bad.

(mare, the Quackers website has links to some great candling pics and there are numerous ones that show what a BAD egg would look like - you might want to check it out so you won't have to worry about detonating any of yours! laugh I used a strong flashlight and a toilet tissue tube - worked great!)

I will candle them again tonight or tomorrow night and if I can see veins then I know we are doing well. If not, I'll take out all the marked ones and let her start over! (weeee! :rolleyes: )

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#55968 - 04/02/04 08:10 AM Re: Egg Storage for incubation?
Anonymous
Unregistered


Hi gals, that's what we used too, and you're right, it worked really great!
Something tells me you're going to have some duckies for your birthday, after all. YIPPEE!!!
Interesting to think about what makes her suddenly really set, rather than only a bit here and there like before. I'm thinking maybe a build-up of that good ol' mothering hormone.

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#55969 - 04/02/04 08:34 AM Re: Egg Storage for incubation?
Anonymous
Unregistered


Hi mare,

Could be the hormones, and not only that, but it was date-coincident with her getting her own pen. The very morning she woke up in her own private duckie pen without those pesky interfering chickens, she sat on the nest for 3 straight hours! That was Monday morning and it has increased from there to all morning to most of the day,and now I believe she is sitting all day with short breaks, but I have not been here the past few afternoons to see for sure. Keep your fingers crossed! I'll let you know what the next candling shows... laugh

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#55970 - 04/03/04 11:44 AM Re: Egg Storage for incubation?
Anonymous
Unregistered


Quote:
Originally posted by mare:
Hi all, Gingit, I've also heard the cellar is the best place for storage of fertile eggs. Good article Deb. I'd read that after two weeks of storage, they are no longer fertile. The article mentioned cloudiness in candling, calling it dead germ, (?) though I'm thinking they're still fine to eat. I'm wondering approximately when they are no longer suitable for eating, since I've scrambled some for our dogs and they absolutely love them, especially our new pup.

I have been saving a few to just dry out and keep in my buffet for display, but I'm actually afraid to barely touch them for fear they'll explode.

We candled some of Julia's eggs and saw the yolk floating around but no veins. We may be giving a couple to my son's class to hatch at school - they're getting an incubator. Oh - can you hatch duck eggs in the same incubator as chicken eggs or are the temperature requirements different?
Gingit - I hope you got a picture of your hen with all those eggs under her! Sounds so sweet, but must be frustrating.
Eggs can stay good for a month or more in the refrigerator and they are still fresher than what you get in the store. After about two weeks storage in the basement for hatching the hatchability drops way off. You'll be able to smell if they start going bad. The smell is unmistakeable. You can hatch duck and chicken eggs in the same incubator. The temp is the same. Humidity is different but you can spritz the duck eggs or adjust humidity about midway between what is needed for chicken and duck. Duck eggs take 28 days, chicken 21 so put the duck eggs in a week earlier than the chicken eggs.

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#55971 - 04/05/04 10:27 AM Re: Egg Storage for incubation?
Sally Offline
Coop Keeper

Registered: 08/15/03
Posts: 686
Loc: Florida
Mare,
You could try to take a few of the duck eggs and do like we did in school!!! Poke a hole in the ends with a pin and blow the yolk and whites out. That way you can clean them and have them for a long, long time with no KA-BOOMS!!! LOL
Sally
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sallyDIABLO

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