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#61141 - 07/30/07 08:23 AM Ringneck Pheasants
Eatnbugz Offline
Bantam

Registered: 09/24/05
Posts: 60
Loc: Oklahoma
I got four ringneck pheasant chicks with an order of peachicks. I lost two before I figured out what to feed them when they wouldnt eat the game starter and were half trampled by the peachicks at the post office.

My question is, is it possible to tame these birds, or will they be scared to death of me their whole lives? The peachicks are "fearless," but the two pheasants I have left are skittish to say the least. Any help would be appreciated.

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#61142 - 07/30/07 10:35 AM Re: Ringneck Pheasants
CJR Online   content
Coop Master

Registered: 07/16/02
Posts: 8489
Loc: Montana
My experience is only with resued wild pheasant eggs and their hatchlings, hatched under Silkie hens, and a neighbors experience years and years ago, with a big hatch of pheasants dayolds, rescued, and one by one, they all died--in a dirty chicken coop.

Pheasant hens move their babies immediately after hatch, leaving any eggs that might be a day late. They are continually "on the go", with occasional stops for resting, the chicks going under the hen. If the season is cold and rainy when they hatch, many are lost, if before they are feathered and more waterproof. They brood only at night and those rest times during the day. What does this tell us about raising pheasant chicks?. They must NEVER be on dirty floor or brooder. When I raised them, they were in small moveable pens, bantam hen, feed and water and a covered area from rain. At night they are enclosed. In the morning, regardless of weather, the corner of the pen is blocked up, so the hen can not get out, but the chicks, range freely and go in and out. CLEAN ground. While they are out, the pen is moved a bit to CLEAN grass. It is moved daily. I also piled any wild seeding plants, grasses, grains in the pen, so the chicks could feel hidden and the hen and chicks learned about finding native seed that was available. At about 6 weeks, the chicks sometimes would not come in at night, roosting about the area. They came back to the pen now and then--I could trap them there, if I wanted to, but I must say that they never were tame like my bantams chicks but I made no effort to "tame" them, if it were possible?? When they no longer returned to the pen, they were FREE. The hen would sometimes begin to lay and was returned to the poultry house with her bantam friends. I did have ONE pheasent that followed her into the house at night, and roosted with the bantams for several weeks, then lelf, free and wild, and I liked to think I heard or saw it--and others of the hatch from time to time in adjoining hay or grain fields????

My experience is still probably valid with Hatchery pheasant chicks.

They may live around you, but are not really ever tame and more likely to always be fearful--which is why they survive well in the wild. They must not be raised with a floor of droppings of their own or chickens (or peachicks). But they are BEAUTIFUL , wonderful to see about the farm, along with Wild Turkeys, that are not difficult to "tame" and come for grain, bring their poults for windfall fruit and can be approached closely most of the year, a mixed flocks will come when they see me with feed. I feel blessed to be able to live with wildlife around the farm, year around and with something "new" to see and hear, every day. CJR

The "something new" does not include the subdivisions encroaching the farm lands and the noises and activities that they bring with them that don't fit in the countryside! Surprisingly pheasants can survive quite a bit of housing, but no one can ever hunt in the newly built up areas, and one more activity is limited or removed by multiplying housing in farming area! Sorry, I must "soapbox" now and then.

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#61143 - 08/05/07 01:52 PM Re: Ringneck Pheasants
Anonymous
Unregistered


We've been raising mutant pheasants into the second year now. They were bought originally to train our two bird dogs. They quickly learn who their caretaker is. While I could never catch one (chickens either for that matter), they will eat from my hand and come running for bread crumbs or shelled peanuts. We can't use them for the dogs anymore; it wouldn't be fair. Now we think they're too tame to release, as they'll hang around and may be killed by the dogs.

I have released hens before (for a loan wild ringneck) that used to fence fight at our pen. Several of these hens wanted back in the pen and were allowed back in, where one of our bantams hatched out 3 mutants and one loan ringneck chick! It's a long but beautiful story.

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#61144 - 08/14/07 10:07 PM Re: Ringneck Pheasants
Anonymous
Unregistered


pheasents are really pretty easy to raise i feed them regular chick starter.

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#61145 - 08/15/07 01:51 AM Re: Ringneck Pheasants
Foehn Offline
Administrator
Lord of the Fowl

Registered: 08/08/06
Posts: 1968
Loc: New Zealand
A friend has recently released some pheasants, both ringneck and others, and they definitely had an inbuilt "wildness" from the day they hatched. She had to provide branches for them to hide under once they moved out from the brooder. No problem raising them. Several of them are fairly tame and hang around at feeding time, and follow her about, but they are beginning to fly greater distances from the homestead now. I have no doubt they will gradually get wilder as they forage more and depend less on provided feed.

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#61146 - 08/23/07 08:34 AM Re: Ringneck Pheasants
Anonymous
Unregistered


Is it okay to mix Ringnecks in with chickens? My son would love to raise a few birds.

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#61147 - 08/23/07 08:14 PM Re: Ringneck Pheasants
CJR Online   content
Coop Master

Registered: 07/16/02
Posts: 8489
Loc: Montana
They are considered quite savage to chickens, and when very young, may not thrive with chicken poop in their pens. Better to have their own quarters. Others may have different experiences. CJR

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