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#62052 - 01/06/06 08:01 AM ageing carcasses w/older birds
Ozark Rose Offline
Flock Leader

Registered: 11/17/05
Posts: 325
Loc: Arkansas
Does anyone have any information on the process used to age/hang chicken carcasses? This technique is used for blue-legged chickens (from Canada) and famous french Poulet de Bresse. I raise Ameraucanas, which are NOT meat birds, and let the roosters mature before culling. I've tried every way imaginable to cook with no luck. From the little I've gathered, this technique uses a mature bird and hangs the carcass for several weeks. Surely it will be more tender (like any game or beef).

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#62053 - 01/06/06 11:42 AM Re: ageing carcasses w/older birds
J. Henderson Offline
Coop Keeper

Registered: 08/16/02
Posts: 674
Loc: New York
I've never tenderized a chicken by hanging the carcass, but here is what I've been told by someone who has been doing it for more than a decade. You just cut the bird's throat, let it hang for three or four days, then proceed with the butchering process like you normally do. He does it in a shed that is ventilated but has a door that closes.

Hanging softens the 'rigor mortis' by allowing the muscles to relax, and the tenderizing process only takes a few days for a small animal. If you let it hang too long, the meat may get a stronger, more gamey taste. Don't hang it for several weeks, says he, or it could go bad. The life cycle of a house fly is eight days, after all.

How hygienic is this? He says he doesn't gut the bird before letting it hang for several days, but he admits that there will be an unpleasant smell, but that it doesn't affect the flavor or quality of the meat. As long as the meat is properly cooked and reaches the right temperature before it is eaten, you should not get salmonella or food poisoning or anything else bad from poultry that has been hung.

And if you do it in the winter, you shouldn't have to worry about flies.

Finally, he claims, if you slow cook it for at least six hours in lots of wine, you will never have eaten a more tender bird. But then I've slow cooked an old rooster without hanging the carcass for days and thought it came out pretty tender anyway.

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#62054 - 01/06/06 05:59 PM Re: ageing carcasses w/older birds
Sandy Ki Offline
Bantam

Registered: 07/16/05
Posts: 58
Loc: Minnesota
I have heard and had good success with, butcher in the normal fashion, then keep the butchered bird in the fridge for a couple of days before freezing it or eating it.

Even butchering deer or beef or pork, you ALWAYS eviserate then age. I would not want to eat a bird that had hung with the inards for a couple of weeks!

smile
Sandy

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#62055 - 01/09/06 06:42 AM Re: ageing carcasses w/older birds
J. Henderson Offline
Coop Keeper

Registered: 08/16/02
Posts: 674
Loc: New York
I'd eviserate the bird first myself. I was reporting what I'd been told by one ole-timer.

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#62056 - 01/09/06 09:56 AM Re: ageing carcasses w/older birds
Ozark Rose Offline
Flock Leader

Registered: 11/17/05
Posts: 325
Loc: Arkansas
I've 2 to try now. Maybe I'll try it both ways and let you know. Hopefully I'll get them before the possums. If I don't respond, you'll know to evicerate your bird ... ha!ha!

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#62057 - 01/11/06 05:22 AM Re: ageing carcasses w/older birds
Sandy Ki Offline
Bantam

Registered: 07/16/05
Posts: 58
Loc: Minnesota
Ozark..... How are ya doin??? LOL

smile
Sandy

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#62058 - 01/15/06 08:06 PM Re: ageing carcasses w/older birds
BC Breeder Offline
Coop Keeper

Registered: 07/16/02
Posts: 434
Loc: Canada
Turkey operation here which supplies a "New York" dressed bird. They kill and dry pluck their birds. Very important to not rip the skin as the skin is what protects the carcass from rot. Then they hang with inards in for 2 weeks in a cooler. They get top dollar.

Personally, I have no interest in trying it, but each to their own. I would rather just tenderize a bird by letting sit in the fridge (fully processed) for a couple days and then moist cook on low for long. Makes the oldest roos more than palatable. We actually are developing quite a solid customer base for our extra processed ameraucana, araucana, and rhodie roos. They are heritage chicken, not factory chicken. They are not the same and shouldn't be cooked the same.
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#62059 - 01/16/06 05:40 AM Re: ageing carcasses w/older birds
Jocelyn Offline
Lord of the Fowl

Registered: 08/26/02
Posts: 1467
Loc: Canada
Chop his head off, scald and pluck and dress...age in fedge for 3 or 4 days. Boil gently in water with one baylaef and some summer savoury till very tender. Remove the breast meat and press it down in a bowl with a plate over it to keep it moist. When the breast is cool, you can slice it for sandwiches....or cut into bite sized pieces and bread it and bake for sweet and sour sauce dipping later...or take the wole simmered bird and marinate in salad dressing (Russian is good) then bake till hot and slightly reduced in the sauce.....Save the legs for chicken salad or caseroles, as they don't fall apart so easily as the breast. You can also roast long and slow insead of boiling...put a little celery in the dressing to make moisture to tenderize the breast from the inside. The secret to tender legs is that 3 or 4 days in the fridge before cooking.

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#62060 - 01/16/06 07:42 AM Re: ageing carcasses w/older birds
Sandy Ki Offline
Bantam

Registered: 07/16/05
Posts: 58
Loc: Minnesota
Ozark, I'm getting really worried about you!

wink
Sandy

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#62061 - 01/16/06 08:20 AM Re: ageing carcasses w/older birds
Garden Chick Offline
Coop Keeper

Registered: 08/23/05
Posts: 447
Loc: Minnesota
Yeah, it's been a week!

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#62062 - 01/19/06 02:11 PM Re: ageing carcasses w/older birds
Sandy Ki Offline
Bantam

Registered: 07/16/05
Posts: 58
Loc: Minnesota
Hmmmmmmmm..... I guess we know to evicerate first!

wink
Sandy

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#62063 - 01/19/06 02:42 PM Re: ageing carcasses w/older birds
Garden Chick Offline
Coop Keeper

Registered: 08/23/05
Posts: 447
Loc: Minnesota
Yes, it's making me a little scared, seriously! She usually posts regularily. Maybe it's an early April Fool joke. I hope.

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#62064 - 01/19/06 03:03 PM Re: ageing carcasses w/older birds
Rob2 Offline
Classroom Professor

Registered: 03/28/03
Posts: 3068
Loc: Pennsylvania
Probably no one here would like "hairy beef" I guess !! I dont think it's aged that way anymore, not in the U.S.A. anyways.

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#62065 - 01/24/06 07:52 AM Re: ageing carcasses w/older birds
Ozark Rose Offline
Flock Leader

Registered: 11/17/05
Posts: 325
Loc: Arkansas
Sorry to worry you all!!! When it came down to it, I just couldn't face evicerating after it sat there getting good and ... blech!
I dry plucked, dry hung in fridge at about 45 degrees. Tried one for 2 days-wasn't very good but better than fresh. Tried one at 7 days- now we're talking, was soft to work with and not gamey at all. Tried the last at 10 days- let me tell you this is the way! I've got one more poor guy who's not up to snuff I'll try at aging 2 weeks and an older one aging even longer(been trying to find him a home cause he's got everything but perfect feather color but oh well! ...).
What is the name of that turkey company? I'd love to see if maybe those innards became more "managable" with time.
In reguards to "hairy" beef, people around here still hang meat if it's the right time of year, but skinned. When I lived in Colorado (it's cooler!) we all hung our meat up to 3 weeks before touching it. That was why I wasn't afraid of trying aging chicken.

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#62066 - 01/25/06 09:25 AM Re: ageing carcasses w/older birds
Sandy Ki Offline
Bantam

Registered: 07/16/05
Posts: 58
Loc: Minnesota
WHEW!!! Good to have you back Ozark!

smile
Sandy

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#62067 - 01/23/08 03:38 PM Re: ageing carcasses w/older birds
Major080 Offline
Feather

Registered: 03/27/07
Posts: 26
Loc: New York
so I was reading this and it just stopped. Ozark what happen when you aged it longer (2 weeks and on)?????

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