Topic Options
#62207 - 06/08/04 10:36 AM "Aging" vs. "straight to the pot" Which is better?
Larissa Offline
Coop Cleaner

Registered: 06/09/03
Posts: 174
Loc: Oregon
I've got a 6lb., 13 month old, lean rooster to cook as of this morning.

The woman at the poultry processing farm we took him to insisted that we cook him right away. But, my mother, who is a tried an true farm girl and definitely no stranger to stewing hens, tells me that I should wait 24-48 hours.

I already did a seach in this category to see if I could get a more difinitive answer, but was unable to find much info specifically on this topic

I intend to stew him for 2-3 hours. Will it even matter if I wait?

Thanks in advance for advice.

Top
#62208 - 06/08/04 12:26 PM Re: "Aging" vs. "straight to the pot" Which is better?
Anonymous
Unregistered


I'm going to quote myself (I hope that's not too cocky of me... I just don't want to type it all again smile ) from a comment I made in this very forum (Look at the "Stringy Meat" topic) not too long ago:

"I totally agree about aging birds. I've read up on it and experimented with it because I didn't understand WHY people age chicken. Now I know.

One website said that you HAVE GOT to wait at least 4 hours after butchering before cooking so rigor mortis will stop. They said that if you eat a bird too soon it will be "stringy." I decided to try that, and let a fresh-killed bird age (in my 38 degree fridge) for only 5 hours before roasting.

The bird was delicious and juicy, but it was like eating rubber hose. There is a huge difference between stringy and rubbery. It was not dry and stringy like overcooked chicken, but the meat couldn't be cut at all, so it peeled off in long chunks which I suppose could be called strings. We had butchered two chickens that day, and let the other one age, as recommended in all of my books, in a 36-40 degree fridge for 48 hours. Chicken #2 was prepared the same way and turned out to be the tastiest, most tender, least rubbery chicken we've ever had in our lives.

Since that experiment, I am quite an advocate of aging chickens.

By the way: both of those chickens were about 8 weeks of age when we butchered. The toughness was in no way an age issue."

Top
#62209 - 06/09/04 07:15 AM Re: "Aging" vs. "straight to the pot" Which is better?
Anonymous
Unregistered


I do age all my birds for 2 to 3 days before cooking or freezing. I don't know if all of them need it or not. The dry plucked chickens are soft and do not stiffen up like the wet plucked chickens.
Carol

Top
#62210 - 06/09/04 10:58 AM Re: "Aging" vs. "straight to the pot" Which is better?
Larissa Offline
Coop Cleaner

Registered: 06/09/03
Posts: 174
Loc: Oregon
Hmm,.......

Well, If the dry-plucked chickens are soft then maybe that would explain why he is still stiff as a darn board even 24 hours later now.

Am I doomed? Seriously, I have never felt a chicken carcass to be so rigid. He's like chicken skin stretched over a Good Year tire eek

I think I may post another now as I have some new questions.

Top
#62211 - 06/22/04 08:11 AM Re: "Aging" vs. "straight to the pot" Which is better?
CJR Online   content
Coop Master

Registered: 07/16/02
Posts: 8483
Loc: Montana
Butcher shops that have chickens hanging in rows, are the best example of letting a little aging take place before preparing them. We are so afraid of spoilage (and, of course, should be concerned), but flash freezing isn't necessary and a little delay will help fulfill expectation of a great meal. CJR

Top


Moderator:  Admin @ The Coop, Foehn