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#66035 - 03/10/04 09:41 AM Retention time - grit in gizzard
Anonymous
Unregistered


During the winter I feed grit mixed directly with the lay ration because the ground is covered with snow and the birds don't get grit naturally.

I was wondering if grit stays in the gizzard longer than food-stuffs do. A retention mechanism can be imagined, for example, if the gizzard lets pass essentially more-or-less liquid material by squeezing it through a 'closed' orifice, then the grit could be retained to a large extent.

I hope people will respong who have studied retention times or who are familiar with them.

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#66036 - 03/10/04 09:59 AM Re: Retention time - grit in gizzard
R. Okimoto Offline
Lord of the Fowl

Registered: 07/18/02
Posts: 1498
Loc: Arkansas
I've never seen a study on this, but the larger stones can stay in the gizzard long enough to become as smooth as pebbles in a stream. Anybody that has done rock tumbling might give us an estimate on how long it takes to tumble rocks smooth. It could be a week or so.

I'd guess that the smaller grit like sand would run right through with the food.

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#66037 - 03/10/04 10:49 AM Re: Retention time - grit in gizzard
Anonymous
Unregistered


One of my too many hobbies is rock tumbling. You start out with a coarse grit then go finer and finer. This for usually 3 or 4 steps with a tumble time of 1 week per grit size. It takes a month to polish a rock of sufficient hardness. Without the last step, which is the polish (using aluminum oxide (ruby) dust), it is a good 3 week process.

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#66038 - 03/10/04 07:21 PM Re: Retention time - grit in gizzard
Sally Offline
Coop Keeper

Registered: 08/15/03
Posts: 686
Loc: Florida
So Leee, with that in mind, and considering the amount of acidity in their system, do you think it takes as long for a pebble in the gizzard to be smooth as a rock in a tumbler or less? With all the Roos you are gonna dress out soon, can you do any kind of tests? Can you intentionally put specific rough pebbles that you are pretty sure they will eat in the pens and then check out their condition when you dress them out? I keep and eat all the gizzards, livers and hearts when I do kill my own birds. The gizzards are full of sand and very small pebbles as well as food. If they readily eat whole corn and pellets will they eat rocks that big?
Sally
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sallyDIABLO

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#66039 - 03/10/04 08:36 PM Re: Retention time - grit in gizzard
Anonymous
Unregistered


Thank you for your note, Sally. The acidity in their stomachs has no effect on stones or "true grit". (pun realized but not intended.) The acidity dissolves the calcium carbonate, but not the granite.

I also take the hearts, gizzards and livers when I butcher. The gizzard contents are particularly interesting as it shows the habits of the birds. (how much grass, corn, grit, and so on that the birds eat)

I don't know ... as soon as the water hose will run, Misters Joy, Boy, Giggle Chicken, Fluffy, Puffy, Muffy, Flappy, Happy, Nappy will go to the big dinner table in the sky. That should be soon... I hope. I'm tired of feeding those boys and there are too many fights in the rooster pen now.

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#66040 - 03/10/04 10:22 PM Re: Retention time - grit in gizzard
CJR Online   content
Coop Master

Registered: 07/16/02
Posts: 8490
Loc: Montana
I am sure the grit, if Granite, lasts a long time, until it grinds itself up, rather than polishes it, since it is not like pebbles when ground granite is contained in the gizzard, but is rough edged all around.

If you withold food for a time, before butchering, there will be little or no food in the gizzard, just grit, and the food is liquid when it leaves--you never see bits of grit or grain or any food in the poop, unlike mammals.

Chickens that eat only commercial feeds and have a starter of grit in the gizzard, may expect it to last for a LONG time. While Grit works against itself, commercial feed require almost no crushing or pulverizing, just sort of emulsifying. The more whole or cracked grains that are fed or available hard stuff, free ranging, the faster the Grit will be used up or ground down to powder size. If you have cleaned gizzards, you will know what a powerful muscle it is! (And the most flavorful, in soup!)

Interesting to clean wild ducks, etc. They mostly have to use sand, as Grit. The Grit that we buy is not the same as the rock and sand they ingest, which is usually softer stuff, would not last as long. Interesting creatures Poultry and Waterflowl! CJR

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#66041 - 03/11/04 11:47 AM Re: Retention time - grit in gizzard
Anny Offline
Coop Keeper

Registered: 07/16/02
Posts: 503
Loc: Belgium
I regularly see chicken poop with a lot of grit in it. Maybe then I have one hen with an abnormality? I have no idea if it's just one hen or all of them. It's most noticeable when it rains, as dry poop will not show the grit.

Lee, it would be easy to test with different color grit. Here we can buy red or whitish grit. Just feed them all one color, then all the other color. That is IF some grit passes, which Jean says it doesn't.

Am I the only one to find grit in droppings?

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#66042 - 03/11/04 08:19 PM Re: Retention time - grit in gizzard
Sally Offline
Coop Keeper

Registered: 08/15/03
Posts: 686
Loc: Florida
Hi Anny,
I can't say as I ever REALLY analized my chickens, or any other poultry's, poop to the extent as to be able to say whether there was or not...LOL. That said, the color grit is interesting. Is there any reason NOT to feed them the colored gravel in fish aquariums? That would certainly give an idea of time traveling POOP laugh laugh wink
Sally
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sallyDIABLO

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