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#67291 - 02/18/04 01:46 PM So who wants to try a psychology experiment?
Anonymous
Unregistered


I just heard about this in my psychology class regarding classical conditioning and such, so I decided to look it up and I came across this article:

Smart Chickens

So does anyone know the algorithm on how to be unbeatable in tic-tac-toe? If I can figure that out, I don't think that it will be too difficult to teach it to some of my chickens.

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#67292 - 02/19/04 04:40 AM Re: So who wants to try a psychology experiment?
Anonymous
Unregistered


All I can say is B. F. Skinner would be VERY proud of you. laugh

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#67293 - 02/19/04 02:15 PM Re: So who wants to try a psychology experiment?
Anonymous
Unregistered


lol laugh

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#67294 - 02/20/04 08:24 PM Re: So who wants to try a psychology experiment?
Anonymous
Unregistered


At Reptile world or repptile park in South Dakota they have a flock of elite chikens that play a variety of games( I saw a buch of leghors and one what I think was a road island red.. one plays the piano another tells fortunes and turns on a light on plays tictac toe and of course always wins. The most impressive however was the chicken that played basket ball. A hovering pingpong ball would shoot up from the groung and she would hop up and peck it pushing it in to the basket twice for only 25 cents.

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#67295 - 02/29/04 06:21 AM Re: So who wants to try a psychology experiment?
Anonymous
Unregistered


There's 2 kinds of conditioning;
Classical conditioning- Pavlov
Operant conditioning- Skinner
Pavlov's is more basic (stimulus-response), while
Skinner takes it further (the more complicated it
is, the higher the animals IQ(?).
Skinner's method is harder too since it involves
closed conditions and lots of repitition (time).
You can condition your chickens to open the doors
of the coop and put feed in the feeders. You will
have to rig a contraption that's within reach for
the birds (ex. a trip plate/perch that's attached
to a door. When a bird stands on the plate/perch,
coop door opens -You can use the same thing for a
feeder).

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#67296 - 03/06/04 05:09 PM Re: So who wants to try a psychology experiment?
Anonymous
Unregistered


M-Man, I'm not at all sure that it is actually the chicken that is playing the tic-tac-toe. When I was a kid the carnival that came through every year had a chicken that played tic-tac-toe. But you couldn't see the chickens board. The Vegas chicken that plays tic-tac-toe also plays on a hidden board. It is likely that the chicken's choices are lighted, either mechanically or by humans, and the chicken is rewarded for pecking there by bits of corn or other feed.

I know a woman who has taught a chicken to 'play cards'. The chicken can play 'high card wins'. The human sets up the cards in a little holder. The cards have very tiny red dots on one end. If the human sets up the card in the holder with the dot end down, then the dot is hidden from the chicken's view. If the card is dot-end up, then the chicken can see it. The human sets up the cards so that the high card has the dot up. The chicken is trained to peck the card with the dot showing.

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#67297 - 03/06/04 06:17 PM Re: So who wants to try a psychology experiment?
Anonymous
Unregistered


Perhaps you're right Leee. But there's only one way to find out and that's to try smile

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#67298 - 03/07/04 04:32 PM Re: So who wants to try a psychology experiment?
Anonymous
Unregistered


I disagree again. There's not "only one way to find out". It would be far less time consuming to just locate someone who does this and find out if the bird is actually playing the game or just pecking a spot that a human or machine has indicated.

Since the tic-tac-toe birds that I have seen are all playing on hidden boards, there is a reason for the fact that it is hidden, namely so that you can't see the stimulus that causes the chicken to peck.

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#67299 - 03/07/04 04:51 PM Re: So who wants to try a psychology experiment?
Anonymous
Unregistered


I agree with Leee. You would have a tough time teaching anything other than a person to play cards. Maybe a monkey would be the only non-human animal that you could possibly train. Chicken are not smart - they can be cute and playful, but it ends there. Anyone paying to see these things (I've never seen one, or heard of one in Aus.) are being scammed - you may as well throw your money down a drain. These people are just cons and should be taught a lesson. mad

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#67300 - 03/14/04 03:55 PM Re: So who wants to try a psychology experiment?
Anonymous
Unregistered


Quote:
Originally posted by Brett Enright:
I agree with Leee. You would have a tough time teaching anything other than a person to play cards. Maybe a monkey would be the only non-human animal that you could possibly train. Chicken are not smart - they can be cute and playful, but it ends there. Anyone paying to see these things (I've never seen one, or heard of one in Aus.) are being scammed - you may as well throw your money down a drain. These people are just cons and should be taught a lesson. mad
I wouldn't be so judgemental yet. I'm going to try this out. I think that chickens are very underrated when it comes to ability to learn.

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#67301 - 03/14/04 04:42 PM Re: So who wants to try a psychology experiment?
Susie Offline
Lord of the Fowl

Registered: 07/16/02
Posts: 1902
Loc: Arkansas
I'm pretty sure they're pecking at a lit up board or something, like Lee suggested. I've seen them before. But, Brett, it's nothing to get uptight about. It's just good ole fun. I've seen several of these Skinner boxes at a theme park in Texas. They were fun. You popped in a quarter to play tic-tac-toe against a chicken. Some would play a piano or things like that. They were just cute, not a "scam".

Susie

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