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#67517 - 01/01/06 11:36 AM Re: NAIS
Eowyn Offline
Flock Leader

Registered: 02/04/04
Posts: 324
Loc: California
We dont have a right to own aniimals ? It is a privlidge? Last time I checked this was still a free country.
Also I wouldnt underestimate the power of the Govt to at least try this rediculous plan and give us a real nightmare in the process.
I hope you are right and this dosent happen, but in the meantime I am not going to sit back and do nothing, next to "volunteering" for this program, that is exactly what they want us to do.

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#67518 - 01/01/06 12:49 PM Re: NAIS
Bill Ludwig Offline
Classroom Professor

Registered: 07/17/02
Posts: 2582
Loc: Ohio
I usually try to stay out of the political side of things here but I have to side with rob on this one. The gov. needs to try to find some way to monitor potential threats. In this case disease in animals. Can they track every animals in this country. I can‘t see how. They can however work with a percentage knowing for x number of recorded animals in an area there are likely x number of unreported also. In the same way sample testing for disease can evaluate a possible threat in a region. There are too many people who are not responsible for their actions either because of ignorance or greed that we can not allow everyone to do whatever they want in the name of freedom and not expect consequences. I truly do not like the idea of having anything I do recorded and tracked but the possible risks of doing nothing are too great. I am sure that the first butcher shop that had to be inspected and comply with big brothers rules felt it was intrusion on their rights but now most would agree that it is a necessary evil to keep everyone safe. As populations continue to grow we are ALL more and more dependent on the large scale production of food and other goods. A large interruption in any part of the production would ripple through every part of our lives. Even if you can provide for your own food you would be affected in other ways as our current economy and life styles are based on what we have to pay to eat as that is the one thing we can not do without.

Having stated that, do I believe everything politicians tell me? Do I agree that they make all the right choices? No, but I don’t have the answers either and I am glad it is not my job to figure it out. I do believe there are times when we must give up some personal freedoms for the benefit of all. I do vote, write letters, sign petitions and back the representatives I believe in. I encourage everyone to do the same whether you agree or disagree with me. Unfortunately the only way we will know if a threat really existed is after we failed to prevent it!

Bill L

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#67519 - 01/01/06 02:08 PM Re: NAIS
Anonymous
Unregistered


It seems that animal identification schemes are driven primarily by the risk of bioterrorism. Since livestock disease has been around for a long time, how do they justify the change (certainly the SARS and AI type threats are rare and have been contained in the past)? This concerted push for a 48 hour traceback (as indicated by APHIS) at this time can only be explained, as such in our current environment, by the need for protection from bio-attack.

These schemes are being implemented by nations worldwide. Just do a google search on "animal identification europe" or such as read about it. There's probably a WHO component to it. So there has to be a political motive involved, too. Mollifying trading partners can only be accomplished if some plan is in place. So NAIS plays that role.

With that said, the government is going to do it's animal identification. Try stopping the 800 pound gorilla. It's absurd. But will it work? Implementing such a plan would be ridiculously expensive. As stated above, RFID tracking is a big undertaking. The logistics involved, including verification, are costly. Who's going to pay for it?

But it's likely that a subset of the overall scheme will occur. Site identification is the first step. If they want to be able to identify and isolate potential disease outbreaks, this is their start (even though they probably have much of the info already from overhead surveillance).

If site identification is reasonable, then is tracking the birth, death, and every movement of every "livestock-type" animal in the US reasonable? Maybe so for some large livestock that generally don't move locations much until its slaughter. But for chickens? LOL

I'm sure that some government managers and large agribusiness would love to have all food producers located in large, well contained, well regualted buildings and organizations. But realistically, this will never happen. The small farmer is too entrenched into "small-town America" and the minds of society. Restructuring does occur. But frankly, unless people explicitly trust agribusiness with all aspects of a healthy food supply (most people don't), there will always be the small farmer for the balance.

If this plan is a security/health issue, it should be funded expressly by the government. These "stop-animal-id" groups should be petitioning legislature to "PAY ALL" aspects of this. Farmers and hobbyists should not shoulder all costs for a national security scheme. It should be paid for by all Americans. Lets see how fast Congress would set aside 10 billion for some wild-eyed, "track everything" scheme. As a hobbiest, I'm willing to share the burden with all Americans. Maybe some of it would be implemented, but then this is the world that we live in.

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#67520 - 01/01/06 02:52 PM Re: NAIS
Rob2 Offline
Classroom Professor

Registered: 03/28/03
Posts: 3068
Loc: Pennsylvania
it could be that bio terrorism is driving the latest push but animal ID & tracking has been going on for some time and it has been getting fine tuned as time passes. There have been similar forms of reporting such as the beef check off and sheep check off, etc. where a certain dollar amount was assessed for each animal sold which was collected to be spent on promoting sales of the product, it was law, not voluntary. I know as I tried to evade a stupidly small amount one time. I sold a lot of about 25 lambs and wasnt inclined to report the sale, about a year and a half later I was more than happy to pay the buck a head to avoid the penalties.
I do think that some kind of site ID might be a helpful thing along with random inspections for general health of the herd/flock. I wouldn't consider that a form of intrusion, AS LONG as ; the monetary burden was borne by the tav paying public; there were no hidden agendas; and the plan was approved by ALL producers in a national referendum. This would eliminate most of the poorest conditions( I am not talking about factory farming conditions) in which animals are kept which could be beneficial to all animal producers, large and small. Some states already have a fee($20) to enlist a premises, paid by the site owner after a certain cutoff date.

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#67521 - 01/01/06 03:50 PM Re: NAIS
Anonymous
Unregistered


Quote:
Originally posted by rob:
it could be that bio terrorism is driving the latest push but animal ID & tracking has been going on for some time and it has been getting fine tuned as time passes. There have been similar forms of reporting such as the beef check off and sheep check off, etc. where a certain dollar amount was assessed for each animal sold which was collected to be spent on promoting sales of the product, it was law, not voluntary.
Yes, livestock tagging/tracking is good for many uses. And implementing it takes a considerable driver, given the understandable resistance. But once it's implemented, the cat's out of the bag. There's little stopping the fee collection and taxation that can be imposed.

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#67522 - 01/01/06 04:59 PM Re: NAIS
Eowyn Offline
Flock Leader

Registered: 02/04/04
Posts: 324
Loc: California
Well, :rolleyes: like I said this is just for your information, not to start a debate. I hope there are a few on this site who were informed that did not know about this, that was my point in posting it, regardless of ones personal opinion on the matter.

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