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#68656 - 12/10/08 07:17 PM Re: Needed help putting my beloved rooster down
Uno Offline
Lord of the Fowl

Registered: 08/26/05
Posts: 1280
Loc: Canada
Jrsy:

Thanks for answering my question. Having never handled one of these guns, I am glad to hear from someone who has.

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#68657 - 12/10/08 07:24 PM Re: Needed help putting my beloved rooster down
IPF Offline
Coop Keeper

Registered: 04/08/08
Posts: 466
Loc: Canada
Uno - how do you kill birds when it's time for them to go?

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#68658 - 12/10/08 09:33 PM Re: Needed help putting my beloved rooster down
Uno Offline
Lord of the Fowl

Registered: 08/26/05
Posts: 1280
Loc: Canada
Hubby built killing cone which contains the bird, no flapping wings or frantic fighting. Bird goes in upside down, head comes out hole in bottom and hubby removes head with single axe swing.

I have been interested in Jrsy's air gun because I think it is a method I might be able to do myself. I have NEVER been able to bring myself to use an axe on any of my chickens. Yet I think it is a responsibility that I should step up to. You know, get over it and do what I got to do. frown

I do believe that with poultry, removal of the head is the best way (or knock out first then remove head) but I am very put off by the blood. I imagine, (perhaps wrongly) that the air gun method would be less bloody. And if a person was good at it, like shooting a cow while she eats from a bucket of grain, hopefully they'd never see it coming. Which is for me the optimumn way to do things, sudden, no panic, final.

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#68659 - 12/11/08 08:42 AM Re: Needed help putting my beloved rooster down
Ryu Offline
Feather

Registered: 07/12/08
Posts: 35
Loc: Iowa
When choosing an appropriate method of euthansia you have to consider the type of animal. CO2 is acceptable for chickens because of their physiology and body mass. It would not be acceptable for a larger bodied animal--yes it would be painful. For a chicken they have a small enough body mass, that they are incapacitated very quickly. A human, for example, has so much oxygen in their body mass--it is pretty hard to suffocate them.

As for restraining an animal for shooting, the animal would need to be sedated before restraint to be considered euthansia.

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#68660 - 12/11/08 09:20 AM Re: Needed help putting my beloved rooster down
Jrsygntbrdr1 Offline
Classroom Professor

Registered: 06/12/05
Posts: 2601
Loc: Arkansas
Who called it euthanasia? I just said it was a good way to make sure the bird was dead.

The chickens that we euthanized in the CO2 tank...didn't die quickly. It took 3-5 minutes in the tank for the bird to be completely dead.

I know what I went through for 10 seconds...I won't put another animal through that. It hurts. We had to put the birds that were not killed through injection into the CO2 container. I prefer the injection to the CO2 tank. They simply...fall asleep.

With injection: they'll click their beak...eyes will get "sleepy" looking...then they'll shake their head and lay it down on the table...and they're gone.

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#68661 - 12/12/08 04:18 AM Re: Needed help putting my beloved rooster down
Maria Ricardo Offline
Past Moderator
Coop Keeper

Registered: 03/26/05
Posts: 434
Loc: Hawaii
ipf wrote

Quote:
We go out early in the morning before the birds are up, take the bird off the roost, knock it on the back of the head to render it unconscious, then take it out and decapitate it.
I am having trouble picturing holding the bird and knocking it on the head. Do you put it down on a block first? Does the bird's unconsciousness eliminate the flapping as they die?

I have been slitting the caroid artery in the neck without the bird being unconscious first. They definitely feel the knife and eventually flap off to heaven. I would like to find a better way.

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#68662 - 12/12/08 09:46 AM Re: Needed help putting my beloved rooster down
Ryu Offline
Feather

Registered: 07/12/08
Posts: 35
Loc: Iowa
Since the initial post was about needing help terminating the life of a 'beloved' pet, I posted information to help people do that. Handling animals for butchering is a completely different consideration.

Again, these methods were researched by the Dept. of Ag. They hooked up cardiac monitors and measured the brain activity of the animals for all of these methods.

For poultry the list of least stressful/painful is Catastrophic blunt trauma to the head, sedation followed by decapitation, then CO2 suffocation.

Keep in mind that even if the animal isn't moving after a overdose of barbituate. The brain is still functioning as long as it is getting oxygen.

I am not advocating CO2, I have a brother who is a dead shot so that's how I handle ill animals that need to be put down. I'm just porviding some information for people who want alternatives.

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#68663 - 12/12/08 09:56 AM Re: Needed help putting my beloved rooster down
IPF Offline
Coop Keeper

Registered: 04/08/08
Posts: 466
Loc: Canada
Thanks for your concise ordering of methods, Ryu. While I understand the distinction between pets and food, the animal in question probably doesn't, and it's the welfare of the animal that seems to be the common thread in this series of posts.

I think that when killing is to be done, for whatever reason, we all want (or should want) to do it in the most humane manner that is practical. I'm very grateful for all this information.

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#68664 - 12/17/08 10:16 PM Re: Needed help putting my beloved rooster down
Maria Ricardo Offline
Past Moderator
Coop Keeper

Registered: 03/26/05
Posts: 434
Loc: Hawaii
I can now answer my own questions. Today I tried the catastrophic blunt trauma method. First I had the bird on the ground, me kneeling over it but I feared it was too close to my knees for club wielding. I got out from over the bird and held him down tightly, hand on his back then whacked. That is a satisfactory method. They still flap. I hold them til they are completely gone. For me there is still a big hurdle about thinking of them as pets and then killing them.

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