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#69540 - 09/04/07 08:15 PM Re: DE Problems
Rogo16 Offline
Coop Keeper

Registered: 10/14/05
Posts: 439
Loc: Arizona
Don't know about the geography, but Kreamer Feed in Kreamer, Pennsylvania carries food (codex) grade DE. 1-800-767-4537


=== STILL, those who swear by DE should continue to use it, and some of us have healthy birds without using it, and don't seem to need to worm our birds anyway, won't bother with the expense. ===


I've been around DE for 30 years. Thank you for letting me continue with it! -G-


=== Rogo is also in the arid, dry Southwest U.S. and not in the humid Eastern or Southeastern U.S. ===


Folks all over the U.S. and the world use DE.


Deworming is not as important to me but it's something I don't have to be concerned with. I feed DE so my critters don't get any sickness, diseases or conditions and neither do I. $23 for a 50 pound bag (some pay more, some less) is a lot less costly than a house full of supplements, prescriptions, over-the-counter stuff, vet bills and medical bills!
_________________________
Rogo

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#69541 - 09/05/07 12:15 AM Re: DE Problems
Anonymous
Unregistered


At what age do you start adding DE food grade to their food? And do you start with a smaller amount? I find I change their food often because they are always kicking their cedar chips into it or poop winds up in it, so I am often cleaning and changing their food. Is there a possibility that I could over dose them with it? Thanks, Suz

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#69542 - 09/05/07 05:16 AM Re: DE Problems
Speckled Hen Offline
Coop Keeper

Registered: 10/24/06
Posts: 534
Loc: Georgia
You can add it anytime at no more than 2% of the total. They can't technically overdose, but I would hesitate to add a huge amount; the 2% is good.

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#69543 - 09/05/07 05:28 AM Re: DE Problems
Upback Offline
Coop Keeper

Registered: 06/04/07
Posts: 457
Loc: Maine
Wow, what great information and food for thought.

I was always under the impression that DE does NOT work for things like roaches, beetles, and earwigs because the DE can't penetrate the exoskeleton of these insects. It sure dries up aphids in a hurry; and when the birds had mites last winter due to a Starling invasion (I think), it worked very quickly. So it must penetrate the softer bodied insects.

Here in Maine I don't have roaches in the coop. There are earwigs out there, but I wonder what is the problem with that as long as the feed bins are secure? I've never known a roach, beetle, slug, or earwig to suck blood or otherwise infest a chicken. They are after other things like grains, food scraps, or other decomposing matter. I am a big advocate of certain food scraps, so I rake the run once a week and compost any remaining material to eliminate bugs looking for rotting food.

Couldn't you just take the bedding out, put it in a pile, and let the chickens do the pest control in the coop and in the bedding pile for a day and then compost the old bedding and replace with fresh? In my mind you have a bunch of free, fresh protein running around the coop. Let the chickens do the work on the bugs (I doubt they eat slugs, though; I have ducks for that), and let them have plenty of access to dust bathing material. They will also take care of their own lice/mite problem. I fill the dust bathing holes in their run with pulverized lime and DE, and they keep themselves pest free. They also peck at it and eat it so possibly they do their own worming as well.

I spent a small part of my evening last night chasing chickens out of the raspberry patch while they were on their nightly hour or so free range time. I had put nice compost filled with worms and beetles on the patch; and the chickens really, really want to eat most small things that crawl. I see no reason that roaches would be any different. That's just my humble two cents worth.

Amy

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#69544 - 09/05/07 06:38 AM Re: DE Problems
Joachim Dippold Offline
Lord of the Fowl

Registered: 02/28/06
Posts: 1823
Loc: Austria
Hello Amy,

Quote:
I doubt they eat slugs, though; I have ducks for that.
Be glad that they donīt!;-)

Slugs produce LOTS of slime/secret when dying. This is the reason for ducks to drown and wash the slugs prior to eating. Ducks that never learn to do that will choke on the slugs because their slime/secret is sticky and closes the eating tube.

Back on topic: Beagledog, I think DE works best if given REGULARLY. I think if one uses DE all the time, parasite populations wonīt explode in the first place.

Have you gotten rid of the worms yet? Itīs been 2 days now, and you should see a difference to the better already. Just interested. :-)

Best greetings,

Joachim

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#69545 - 09/05/07 06:45 AM Re: DE Problems
Joachim Dippold Offline
Lord of the Fowl

Registered: 02/28/06
Posts: 1823
Loc: Austria
Hello,

Quote:
I find I change their food often because they are always kicking their cedar chips into it or poop winds up in it,
Have you tried hanging feeders yet? Or put the feeder on top of something, so the birds canīt scratch dirt into the feeder. Just a tought.

Best greetings,

Joachim

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#69546 - 09/05/07 07:08 AM Re: DE Problems
Susie Offline
Lord of the Fowl

Registered: 07/16/02
Posts: 1902
Loc: Arkansas
Joachim is right. Elevate the feeder and waterer to make it about chest-height, and you'll reduce this problem.

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#69547 - 09/05/07 08:24 AM Re: DE Problems
C. G. McCary Offline
Coop Keeper

Registered: 04/04/07
Posts: 613
Loc: Alabama
My original quote:

Quote:
Rogo is also in the arid, dry Southwest U.S. and not in the humid Eastern or Southeastern U.S.
Rogo's quote:

Quote:
Folks all over the U.S. and the world use DE.
I use DE. My point is that climates, pests, parasites, dangers, predators, etc., vary by region geographically. Different approaches may be needed for someone with chickens in hot, humid areas or some other environment.

Also, I have no experience with my chickens dealing with really cold weather as a lot of you must contend with each winter. It used to snow here in Alabama about once or twice each winter 20-25 years ago. Now, it has not snowed in over a decade. Call it what you want, global warming, whatever, but things are different.

As I have pointed out, I use DE. I envy the arid, southwestern U.S.. I envy colder climate areas (I guess the grass is always greener on the other side). No offense intended. No argument here.

Chris

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#69548 - 09/05/07 09:17 AM Re: DE Problems
Anonymous
Unregistered


Yes, I need to elevate; but being an ignorant first timer, I wound up with chicks that are different ages and sizes. My 3-week-old Silkies would never be able to eat or drink if I put it at the chest height of my 5-week-old RIR or barred Rocks. So in another few weeks when their sizes average out a little, I can get them up a little.

I have to laugh sometimes, my 6-day-old blue Cochin is as large as my 3-week-old Silkies and is getting larger by the hour I think. LOL Unfortunately, I didn't purchase ones that can be suspended. So I will have to set it on something. Any ideas of what won't allow it to slip off?

Thanks,

Suz

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#69549 - 09/05/07 09:49 AM Re: DE Problems
Joachim Dippold Offline
Lord of the Fowl

Registered: 02/28/06
Posts: 1823
Loc: Austria
Hello Suz,

Quote:
Any ideas of what won't allow it to slip off?
Yep, use (old) rims. If the feeder is round it might fit just perfectly;-) Even if the feeder diameter is smaller than the diameter of the rim it cannot slip off but only move a little between the buldge of the rim. See what I mean?

Best greetings,

Joachim

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