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#69550 - 09/05/07 10:20 AM Re: DE Problems
Susie Offline
Lord of the Fowl

Registered: 07/16/02
Posts: 1902
Loc: Arkansas
We usually stack ours on bricks and then later, concrete blocks. The only time they slip off is if they are empty, or close to empty, so it usually isn't a problem.

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#69551 - 09/05/07 12:56 PM Re: DE Problems
C. G. McCary Offline
Coop Keeper

Registered: 04/04/07
Posts: 613
Loc: Alabama
I stack my 3 gallon waterers on round concrete blocks; it takes four of them to get to a std chicken's back height. These blocks are what you would find at a Lowes or Home Depot to make a step path through a garden (each one round & about 18-20 inches in diameter). I find I only need to clean these about every 3 days or so. I put a little vinegar in the water and no algae blooms.

For the younger birds, I have placed bricks for them to step on to drink in a couple of places around each large waterer. I keep 1 - one gallon waterer lower (on two blocks). It is easier to clean and refill. I find it needs cleaning & refilling daily. Chris

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#69552 - 09/05/07 06:02 PM Re: DE Problems
Rogo16 Offline
Coop Keeper

Registered: 10/14/05
Posts: 439
Loc: Arizona
Quote:
I envy the arid, Southwestern U.S. I envy colder climate areas.
I lived for a while in below zero temps. The birds did fine. I didn't! No envy from me about the colder climates!

It's not much of a drive to the northern part of my state for snow, ski lodges, etc. Just not for me.
_________________________
Rogo

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#69553 - 09/06/07 12:16 AM Re: DE Problems
Karen Offline
Flock Leader

Registered: 07/20/02
Posts: 308
Loc: California
I had a brain storm one day after having to change the bedding in the brooder box when those rambunctious older chicks knocked the water over spilling a quart of water. I used that sticky stuff that they use on the bottom of chair pads. Sorry I don't know what it’s called. It comes in a roll and is kind of rubbery.

Right now to raise the water and feed I'm using small crocks turned upside down as a base then a circle of the sticky stuff on the crock and the feeder or waterer on top of that.

Since doing this I haven't had any more spilt water or feed.

Karen
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Karen

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#69554 - 09/06/07 05:39 PM Re: DE Problems
Anonymous
Unregistered


I haven't seen any worms since the Wazine, but I'll hit them again in a week or so. Knowing now that this is not food grade DE, I'm still a bit troubled by why the stuff didn't work as advertised.

Oh well, I won't use this particular type near the birds again anyway. As far as the chickens eating the bugs, roaches are a particularly "wormy" bug. They pass disease and parasites more than most bugs, so I don't want the hens chowing on them constantly.

Thanks, everyone, for all the help.

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#69555 - 09/07/07 05:23 AM Re: DE Problems
Upback Offline
Coop Keeper

Registered: 06/04/07
Posts: 457
Loc: Maine
Yeah, you're right beagledogxxx. I've thought about that too because lots of the Japanese beetles that i feed my birds have been parasitized by either an Ichnumon wasp or a tachnid fly, they have little eggs on their heads. I wondered if i would pass this on to the chickens, but it's been three years of doing this and never a problem. Lots of parasites are very host specific. Some are not. Do you know for sure what type of worms the roaches have and if they would then be passed to parasitize your chickens? I just read a really interesting book about worms and parasites called Parasite Rex. I don't know anything about the effect of roaches on chickens, but I'm really curious about it now. It was just a thought - I just really like the idea of birds eating all kinds of bugs. After reading an article called something like Free Protein From the Sky, I've considered trying keeping meat scraps in a bucket to attract flies, covering the bucket for one week and then feeding fresh maggots. I like the idea but fear keeping up on it rigorously and hatching buckets of flies! Feeding maggots to chickens may sound gross to some, but i bet it would be just fine for them. Heck, they use them in some hospitals to clean up necrotic tissue and stimulate growth. If anyone out there has ever heard of or tried something like this I'd love to hear about it. Maybe I'll try it next summer...

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#69556 - 09/07/07 05:46 AM Re: DE Problems
Joachim Dippold Offline
Lord of the Fowl

Registered: 02/28/06
Posts: 1823
Loc: Austria
Hello Amy,

Quote:
If anyone out there has ever heard of or tried something like this I'd love to hear about it.
Yep, we once bought a bag with tenthousands of Dendrobena (worms) to "breed" them as Winter food. They are easy to raise and as long as you keep the lights on they really won´t crawl out of their box. No lid is needed, so there´s lots of fresh air for the worms constantly. Well, one night I accidentally switched off the lights, and when we returned from work there were thousands of worms happily crawling on the floor! It was a long night collecting them all and placing them back in their box, believe me, you won´t forget to keep the lights on twice...;-)

Well, to make a long story short: we have fed handsful of worms several times, but as they grew we got more and more "attached" to the little crawlers and decided to let them free in the garden...LOL! Softhearted me wanted them to at least enjoy a happy life in the garden instead of in a box before the chickens eat them.

So, it didn´t work for us, but I think raising Dendrobena as food is quite common. I have found several links concerning worms for food, so you will get all the info needed for breeding them online. Fischermen also should know how to breed worms and maggots, BTW.

Nightcrawlers also are a great source for protein, they are HUGE;-) There are lots of different worms in all sizes to fit every chicken, just look around a bit and you´ll be pleased how many of them you can actually breed yourself.

Good Luck and best greetings,

Joachim

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#69557 - 09/07/07 06:52 AM Re: DE Problems
Upback Offline
Coop Keeper

Registered: 06/04/07
Posts: 457
Loc: Maine
Thanks Joachim! So that's what you meant by dendrobena, I had no idea. I still have to try the worm "charming" thing, too. Maybe a good activity for a rainy fall day. Last night we were out picking Tomato Horn Worms off the Brandywines and tossing those big juicy suckers in the pen. The chickens love them. It takes a bit of running, chasing and tearing them up before they can get them down, though. I started a new post about the worm thing since this is way off topic in regards to DE. Sorry Moderators and beagledogxxx!

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