Page 1 of 2 1 2 >
Topic Options
#70781 - 03/24/08 07:47 AM suprising behavior
William Nehus Offline
Feather

Registered: 10/27/07
Posts: 26
Loc: Italy
I have two cockerels in a coop with thirteen pullets. I have one set of nesting boxes on one side and another set on another side. When some of my pullets try to lay the cockerels will climb on the perches and sit down and stare at them. Sometimes they will get in the boxes. I have never seen this before. Then they climb down when one of the pullets gets done laying. What are they trying to do?

Top
#70782 - 03/24/08 10:34 AM Re: suprising behavior
Wyattdogster Offline
Coop Keeper

Registered: 09/22/05
Posts: 493
Loc: Virginia
I have seen this in my own coop, I think they are coaching the pullets to lay and are acting as 'cheerleaders'. Depending on how young your cockerels are, it might just be curiosity.

Top
#70783 - 03/24/08 10:49 AM Re: suprising behavior
William Nehus Offline
Feather

Registered: 10/27/07
Posts: 26
Loc: Italy
Yes i sold my friend a rooster who just had twelve hens and was only getting four eggs a day. He told me that the rooster did the same thing and is now getting eleven to twelve eggs a day now.

Top
#70784 - 03/24/08 11:03 AM Re: suprising behavior
CJR Online   content
Coop Master

Registered: 07/16/02
Posts: 8489
Loc: Montana
You do not know why? It is because the pullet/hen is most fertile, immediately after laying her egg, vent is soft and stretched and fertility is likely. Anthe cock/cockerel climbing in the nest box, is to say: "come on-a my house"--encourage her to lay--and then..the next part of the relationship! It is part of Mother Nature's cycle and is instinctive behavior.

CJR

Top
#70785 - 03/25/08 06:05 AM Re: suprising behavior
Ckvchestnut Offline
Flock Leader

Registered: 06/12/07
Posts: 346
Loc: Canada
That is really interssting stuff! I just observed my new rooster doing that to my hens who were in their nests this morning! Great posts everyone!
_________________________
Ckvchestnut

Top
#70786 - 03/25/08 08:14 AM Re: suprising behavior
C. G. McCary Offline
Coop Keeper

Registered: 04/04/07
Posts: 613
Loc: Alabama
I have observed my cockerel doing this also but did not know the reason.

On a similar vein, some hens are very receptive to being covered while others act like they are being "murdered." Does it ever get any "better" for the more uptight hens? The reason I ask is because I had to remove the "easier" hens from sight & sound because the rooster favored them. To obtain the breedings I desired, I've had to remove the favored hens from the premises & confine cocks/cockerels to closer quarters with the desired hens. I'm still waiting to see if I have been successful in this endeavor.

I'm guessing cocks/cockerels get "better" as they get older too? Also, what do you do if a hen is loyal to old one and terrified of the new one [but you'd like to breed her to the cock she considers the "monster."] Does anyone else have these problems?

Top
#70787 - 03/25/08 04:46 PM Re: suprising behavior
Wyattdogster Offline
Coop Keeper

Registered: 09/22/05
Posts: 493
Loc: Virginia
From what I have observed, the cockerels do get "better" as they mature. They develop some finesse and seem more considerate of the hens. They become kinder and gentler! I know, I am anthropomorphizing my feathered friends....a no no! wink

Top
#70788 - 03/25/08 09:54 PM Re: suprising behavior
RuffEnuff Offline
Ruler of the Roost

Registered: 01/27/06
Posts: 1148
Loc: Australia
most of my roosters like to show hens where to lay. the pekins especially. they hop in nests and call their hens. this is especially useful when a hen does not know where to lay or cannot make up her mind. sometimes the rooster will block her access out of the nest on the especially undecided hens. once the hen is settled he goes off and does his other chores.

sometimes i will find my roosters will look after chickens. they enjoy having the new chickens picking their faces and seem to go into a trance.

i love watching the roosters' behaviour and cannot get over how so many people hate roosters and seee no use in them. use some can be bad and loose the plot but generally they are a very important and have a very useful social structure, more than just fertilizing eggs.
k

Top
#70789 - 03/28/08 05:20 PM Re: suprising behavior
Ckvchestnut Offline
Flock Leader

Registered: 06/12/07
Posts: 346
Loc: Canada
I am wondering, at first my hens weren't too sure of the new roosters (Elvis) the alpha cock has won some popularity it seems as I have seen about 4 of my hens standing beside him looking up and admiring or grooming/picking food off his beak... do you think this confirms a settled hierarchy within the flock as well as hopefully already some matings, I plan to set my incubator on Sunday night...
_________________________
Ckvchestnut

Top
#70790 - 04/01/08 01:10 AM Re: suprising behavior
RuffEnuff Offline
Ruler of the Roost

Registered: 01/27/06
Posts: 1148
Loc: Australia
no. the rooster who is most gentlemanly will get his hens but the most aggressive rooster may get them more often. might also boil down to the quickest too. it might all have something to do with the quickest sperm.

having 2 roosters in the same pen may end up with reduced fertility as each rooster knocks the other off the hen.
k.

Top
Page 1 of 2 1 2 >


Moderator:  Admin @ The Coop, Foehn