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#70791 - 04/01/08 03:41 PM Re: suprising behavior
J. Meyer Offline
Chicken

Registered: 01/17/08
Posts: 122
Loc: South Dakota
This post is totally off topic, but do you see the amazing diversity of where all these posts originate from? Italy, Australia, Ontario, Montana, Alabama, Virginia, and now South Dakota. What an amazing time we're living in.

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#70792 - 04/04/08 07:01 AM Re: suprising behavior
Ckvchestnut Offline
Flock Leader

Registered: 06/12/07
Posts: 346
Loc: Canada
Yeah that totally is amazing to share ideas around the entire world! LOL

I have some more surprise behaviour to share with you guys and I want to know who else has experienced and what they might chalk it up to. First off, I took the smaller rooster out of that coop and put him in the barn - he was pulling tail feathers off my hens inspite of my chasing him around - too big for his little britches so he got banned. I am wondering if my first roo will continue to be able to cover the entire flock of hens, I have 14 if them with him currently. Will the fact that he can hear the other roo in the barn keep the level of competition up?

Now for the weird behaviour: My husband told me that last night when he was in the yard he heard some squawking so he turned around toward the coop and saw Elvis trying to mate with one of the hens, but... our alpha hen was right there too, pinning down the hen to sort of assist the rooster to mate. Does this make any sense? I didn't get to see it I wasn't there. My husband said that the rooster dismounted and came back a few minutes later and did the deed with the same hen and there was no cuffuffle about it, after the deed the hen shook out her feathers and went back to grazing - the alpha hen was not involved this time. Is this normal? Was the alpha hen trying to assist the rooster in getting his job done or was it just coincidence that she was trying to asert her dominance at the same time? I know that prior to getting the rooster, she would sometimes peck lightly at the other hens' combs and they would squat in a mating stance but that was it.
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#70793 - 04/04/08 08:33 AM Re: suprising behavior
CJR Online   content
Coop Master

Registered: 07/16/02
Posts: 8483
Loc: Montana
JProbably trying to "protect" the hen, just as she would try to protect her chicks (if she had some) from a threat. It is an instinctive behavior to protect. The hen being mated against her will, gave the voice that said "I'm being attacked". They have a languge which is instinctive--like the voice for "hawk" or "cat" or "laying eggs--before and after", (lots more) and all the birds react appropriately to each of those voices.

Chickens are pretty interesting-- from egg-- to clucky hen,-- to old cocky cock! CJR

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#70794 - 04/04/08 08:49 AM Re: suprising behavior
Ckvchestnut Offline
Flock Leader

Registered: 06/12/07
Posts: 346
Loc: Canada
Thanks that would make sense, as the mother hen is not a mean girl, she loves all the other hens (even though they are not really hers). That hen, is one of my high strung ones, I bought her as a started bird from a hatchery and could tell she never had the same kind of handling as the ones we raised ourselves, she was quite timid but is warming up and is very talkative now to us.
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