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#71684 - 07/28/05 04:41 PM Few Questions (VERY LONG)
Pierre Offline
Chicken

Registered: 04/05/05
Posts: 108
Loc: New York
I have a few questions and wanted to knock them all out in one swing.

First Question:
My older birds are now 17wks old (holding my breath for eggs). I have eight 10wk old (5 male, 3 female) birds. Assimilation is going great, they are coming out more and more from their safe spot. What do I do when my older birds come into lay and I switch to Layer which I know I can't feed to the younger ones. Can I just keep them all on grower and feed oyster shell free choice to supply the needed calcium? Can they lay ok for 8-9 weeks until the younger ones catch up?

Next Question:
I posted before that we will be moving down to Georgia this coming winter (mid-winter). My family is open to suggestions on how to move all the layers (about 30 birds) with us without killing them in the process. I fear that we will just have to eat them and start over down south, I would really, really, really prefer not to do that since I like them much more than I do my broilers (get me?). I must admit I have grown attached to my layer flock. Anyone have any ideas how I can drive them down, it is about a 15 hour drive?

Last question:
The property we are buying in Georgia is about 8 acres (zoned agricultural-residential). I plan to build a perfect chicken system. I want to build a coop, and a brooding house, with some breeding pens and I would like to integrate automatic watering this time. I would just love it if some of you guys shared their setup (ideas) with me.

I know this is a very long post and that I do post a lot, but please HELP me out for the chickens sake :p smile

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#71685 - 07/28/05 06:11 PM Re: Few Questions (VERY LONG)
CJR Offline
Coop Master

Registered: 07/16/02
Posts: 8489
Loc: Montana
First question, by all means continue to feed all your birds unmedicated Start and Grow or a Grower Feed until the young birds come into lay, then mix for a while, then all Layer Ration. They will all do fine. Some people never change to layer feed and get comparable results with eggs.

To move birds, it would just be like shipping adult birds. Box them in ventilated boxes, with shavings lining. Put just 3,4 or 5 birds per box, depending upon sizes of boxes, so they will not get overheated. If you know hens that get along better than others (age groups) box them that way. Cocks may not travel well together, so one per a hen-box, if you keep any cocks. When normal shipping, they are in a box for up to 2 days, sometimes more. Weather must be cool enough that they will not suffer from heat or lack of water. I feed and water my birds just before shipping, so I know their crops are full and they have had a drink. If the boxes are quite dark, except for ventilation leaks of light, they just have a long night and may "sleep" most of the trip. If you move them in an enclosed truck, they can travel in cages. Then you can hang feeders and waterers on the wire. They should not be packed in the way they go to the butchers! I do place apples in my shipping boxes, cut in half--most are eaten, cleaned right out of the skins, upon arrival. Laying hens may have the most stress and there may be eggs in the boxes on arrival, but if they are moved into a roomy coop, with nice dry bedding and nest boxes that are familiar, they will adjust quickly. Best not to free range or release into outside runs for a few days until they are used to their new home. I would never leave my hens behind, if I moved (nor my breeding males). Just have to plan ahead--and have the food and water ready for arrival--

As for cooping. there are some good books available. Mine, for minus 30 degree winters would not be as easy as for poultry setups in GA. What a neat new project! Good luck, CJR

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#71686 - 07/29/05 07:16 AM Re: Few Questions (VERY LONG)
Ges Offline
Chick

Registered: 07/20/05
Posts: 19
Loc: Missouri
Important. Will you have housing ready for your chickens when they arrive??
If not, then dispose of them and start over when you have your coops, houses, etc.

If you have the housing and you want to move the chickens - just rent a trailer or an enclosed truck and move them as CJR stated. BUT you must have the appropriate housing ready whent hey arrive.

ges

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#71687 - 07/29/05 07:30 AM Re: Few Questions (VERY LONG)
Pierre Offline
Chicken

Registered: 04/05/05
Posts: 108
Loc: New York
Thanks guys, all the info is greatly appreciated.

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#71688 - 07/29/05 07:33 AM Re: Few Questions (VERY LONG)
Pierre Offline
Chicken

Registered: 04/05/05
Posts: 108
Loc: New York
I actually forgot one question. What does the "I laid an egg song" sound like?

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#71689 - 07/29/05 08:21 AM Re: Few Questions (VERY LONG)
CJR Offline
Coop Master

Registered: 07/16/02
Posts: 8489
Loc: Montana
Almost identical to the "I'm GOING to lay an egg song". We used to say, "cut,cut,cudaacka" repeated many times. It is also something like the "I see a cat (dog,but not a hawk warning.) alert call, just not as frantic, but just as persistant! You need to watch and listen, and you will associate the sounds of chicken communication with the circumstance. CJR

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#71690 - 07/29/05 01:22 PM Re: Few Questions (VERY LONG)
Jocelyn Offline
Lord of the Fowl

Registered: 08/26/02
Posts: 1467
Loc: Canada
Buck, buck, buck, BUCKAWK, buck, buck, buck, BUCKAWK! repeated several times, slight pause, then starts all over for several repetitions.

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#71691 - 07/29/05 06:19 PM Re: Few Questions (VERY LONG)
Anonymous
Unregistered


Transporting fowl is easy! Just DON'T Let them get too hot!! You can purchase suitable carry boxes from http://randallburkey.com
Best to have a place for them ready when they get there.
Also VERY IMPORTANT!! MAKE SURE ALL birds have been NPIP (National Plan for the Improvement of Poultry) tested and carry a leg band, with number that corrosponds to the number on the papers you will be given by the NPIP tester.
The test is only about 10 cents per bird, and without the test and results, it is ILLEGAL for your chikins to leave the state.
And in light of recent federal legislation, be prepared to explain (in case you get stopped for speeding or something) That "these are egg layers and that's all"! And have the NPIP papers handy.
For a 15 hour trip you should be fine.

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#71692 - 07/30/05 12:08 AM Re: Few Questions (VERY LONG)
Jrsygntbrdr1 Offline
Classroom Professor

Registered: 06/12/05
Posts: 2601
Loc: Arkansas
Shorty, the crop and "craw" are the same thing. Chickens, and is it mandatory that the birds must have NPIP test? In my state it is not yet mandatory, at least I don't think so. I agree with Shorty in one aspect, if you can rent a large van with A/C it will greatly reduce heat stress on the birds. Also, make sure that they have plenty of food and plenty of water before they get into the crates/boxes/whatever. The apple idea is great! Car games! yay!

Make sure that with whatever you use, you do not put only newspaper as an litter for the boxes. Be sure to use shavings that way the birds have nice footing and don't slide everywhere.

Good luck and I hope you don't have to ditch the birds.

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#71693 - 07/31/05 05:30 PM Re: Few Questions (VERY LONG)
Anonymous
Unregistered


Yes The "Crop" and "Craw" are the same, (one spelled properly and the other spelled as it is pronounced).
I belive that in order to transport poultry from one state to another (crossing state lines) It IS Mandatory that they be tested for any communicable illness, such as avian influenza, fowl pox, wet pox, Newcastle, Laryngo-tracheitis,
And any other disease which could potentially cause an outbreak in the state or states that you plan to go through.
I go to shows nationwide and have found that this must be done.

You say ya'll are plannin' to move in "Mid-winter", If in Jan or Feb the heat may not be as much of a problem.

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