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#75169 - 08/04/03 11:02 AM Re: Introducing a new roo to an established flock with an older roo.
Anonymous
Unregistered


You could do a "Free Rooster" poster at the local feed stores. I have gotten rid of a few birds that way and I know many of them happily live with ladies of their own now. Just an idea smile

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#75170 - 08/04/03 11:06 AM Re: Introducing a new roo to an established flock with an older roo.
Anonymous
Unregistered


No offense taken. Yes, Jason I have. And I have had them die in my arms too. It is amazing how that docile, sweet rooster can turn into a killer in a moment.

I learned from experience and it taught me an ounce of prevention was worth a pound of cure.

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#75171 - 08/04/03 11:39 AM Re: Introducing a new roo to an established flock with an older roo.
Anonymous
Unregistered


Space is the biggest factor in a new roo sucessfully getting along. If the new bird has space to get away, he'll run off before he gets killed, if they fight that severly to begin with. Another thing that helps is moving him in with a hen, for some reason the established birds dont seem to pick on the new one as much.

I have over 20 full grown cocks, from various hatches and sources, and have not lost a bird yet, and its a mix of standard and bantam and assoted breeds. Cochin crosses, sex-links, white leghorns, unknown mutts, autralorop, rhode island red.

Introduce him before hes trying to mount hens, ive never know of a cock to attack a baby, and if hes in the peck order before hes sexually mature he'll be fine.

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#75172 - 08/05/03 07:54 AM Re: Introducing a new roo to an established flock with an older roo.
J. Henderson Offline
Coop Keeper

Registered: 08/16/02
Posts: 674
Loc: New York
I am not sure where I stand on this issue. We have successfully introduced an Andalusian rooster with two hens to a flock of 30 hens and a Brahma roosters. But the introduction was a very slow process, and the birds were entirely separated for several weeks, first.

But we have had several roosters injured in fights, with son turning on father, and brother on brother. And in support of what CJR suggested, we have seen roosters' personalities change significantly depending on where and with whom they are.

As for CJR's comment "there really isn't any reason to keep another rooster," I would agree in theory. In practise, we have been too chicken-hearted and busy to do our excess roosters in.
New to butchering, we have friends who have offered to share a butchering day to show us how it is done, but for close to a year, we haven't come up with a good date to get together.

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#75173 - 08/05/03 10:33 AM Re: Introducing a new roo to an established flock with an older roo.
Larissa Offline
Coop Cleaner

Registered: 06/09/03
Posts: 174
Loc: Oregon
Whew!, thanks all. That was quite a lot of differing opinions and debates to wade through.

I probably should have mentioned in my first entry though that Lucille is a pet. All of my chickens are and that is the main reason why I got them. For me personally, they are not just for eggs and even though I eat chicken, these ones are definitely not for meat. That would be almost as bad as eating my cat. So butchering is not an option I am willing to go with.

I will try it out with my mom's flock. I may do it slowly with separate pens at first and I will probably do it sooner than later as the point made about introducing before sexual maturity seems to make sense (and most of you also seemed to agree on that point as well). I also have considered sending Wilma, one of my pullets with him. However, putting up signs in the local feedstore to find another roosterless home is also not a bad idea altthough I may have to go farther afield as most of the people who go to my feedstore are in the same boat as myself in not being able to have roosters. Giving Lucille to my mom is my first choice though so that I can at least visit him from time to time and watch him grow up. I can already tell that he is going to be a beautiful RI roo.

If there is a lot of fighting with my mom's roo then I will find another home for Lucille. I suppose this may sound like a lot of trouble to go through for one rooster for some, but I know it will be worth for me in the end when I find a good home for him.

Damn city laws. I'm not exactly sure why roosters are not allowed other than the noise factor. I'd have to say though that if that's the only reason then all the dogs that live around me make just about as much noise if not more.

I also wondering if some hatcheries (I'm not going to mention any names) could perhaps be a little more accurate in sexing their chicks. Lucille came from pullet run of RI that was supposed to be 90% accurate. What the hell?...I only got five chicks! I'm suspicious that I could be that unlucky to get one roo out of five on my first go at getting chickens.

Anyway, thanks again.

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#75174 - 08/06/03 09:18 AM Re: Introducing a new roo to an established flock with an older roo.
Anonymous
Unregistered


luck of the draw, dont complain. Its very hard to correctly sex chicks, people are bound to get miss sexed chicks on occasion. If you dont want the risk of miss sexed birds get adults.

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#75175 - 08/06/03 10:45 PM Re: Introducing a new roo to an established flock with an older roo.
Anonymous
Unregistered


Hey... talk to your district councilperson about the "no roosters" rule. You might try explaining the "dogs make noise at all hours of the gosh darn day and night" arguement and see if it gets you anywhere. If you kept your big guy up in the mornings so he didn't crow until way up in the day... it is not bad at all. Better than a big dog barking for hours on end!! Chickens are getting far more popular as urban pets. smile

We urban chicken keepers gotta change the world one cock-a-doodle-do at a time!!!

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