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#77479 - 06/30/07 11:36 AM Re: De-Crowing a Rooster
Luisa Fels Offline
Bantam

Registered: 02/28/07
Posts: 69
Loc: California
hi kodiblue--if you decide to find a home for your roo, we c'n offer one, but we're in no. calif and i'm not sure how we'd get him in time. lemme know if you want to consider it. we're on 40 acres, surrounded by 100s more uninhabited, and we have no neighbors who could complain, since the closest one we could have jailed for growing pot. he'd just have to learn to put up w/ yacky geese and guineas. whaddaya think? we might even be able to put him in w/ my sis-in-law's chickens . . . . she's pretty accomodating . . . . we share this place. . . .

take care--luisa
_________________________
L. Fels

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#77480 - 06/30/07 11:44 AM Re: De-Crowing a Rooster
Luisa Fels Offline
Bantam

Registered: 02/28/07
Posts: 69
Loc: California
hi kodiblue--ma again, luisa--in case you're interested in us taking your roo, you c'n reach me at lfels@hotmail.com.
_________________________
L. Fels

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#77481 - 07/02/07 09:22 AM Re: De-Crowing a Rooster
Hicks Chicks Offline
New Egg

Registered: 06/27/07
Posts: 8
Loc: Georgia
Has anyone had any experience with either caponizing or chemical caponizing. It used to be a very common occurance on the farms, and it quiets the rooster (capon). It used to be done so the capon would gain weight in a short period of time and end up weight up to 8 pounds. It was a way to not have a bunch of roosters crowing in the pasture. It is said to make the very docile also.
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Debra Hicks

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#77482 - 07/03/07 06:09 PM Re: De-Crowing a Rooster
Blackdotte Offline
Ruler of the Roost

Registered: 10/02/04
Posts: 913
Loc: Australia
Chemical caponising became illegal many years ago in Europe .UK,Aust & NZ many years ago,it was accomplished by use of female hormones,& us guys started developing breasts the girls would have been proud of. Surgical caponising entails the removal of the testes,no an easy thing as the testicles are inside the body. You need to cut somewhere under the wing,fish them out & stitch. My father said many never survived.

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#77483 - 07/04/07 03:56 AM Re: De-Crowing a Rooster
Jocelyn Offline
Lord of the Fowl

Registered: 08/26/02
Posts: 1467
Loc: Canada
I have about a 150 roosters and they have never injured each other. They have enough space and enough hens that they spar a little in the spring and all settle down after about 3 weeks. Some of the modern production strains have lost their brains in the effort to breed more and more efficiency into them. These roos don't know how to court a hen, and just beat her up if she won't allow mating with no dancing roo. They fight among themselves and can leave each other cut up badly. These are where the stories of roos killing each other come from. If Georgie can be placed where there are 6 or 8 hens and no roo, he will be in heaven...and you might be able to get a couple of his female offspring from the folks you give him to. Failing that, you could place him with someone who will pen him with 2 hens for a week or so, then free range him in a mixed flock.
With 2 hens of his own, he can gradually work his way up the peck order and will be OK, as long as he has lots of space. A family with older children would be ideal, as Georgie will probably love riding around the yard on bicycle handlebars and other kid stuff that will make him still a pet.

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#77484 - 07/04/07 12:05 PM Re: De-Crowing a Rooster
Anonymous
Unregistered


Wow........loved your letter. I will certainly make sure and let them know we don't want any Roos with him. Gosh I hope we can get him a place like that, with kids and hens.

Thanks...
Georgie's Mama

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#77485 - 07/06/07 07:46 AM Re: De-Crowing a Rooster
Michael TX Offline
Chicken

Registered: 12/24/04
Posts: 95
Loc: Texas
This whole thread again points out that there is a DEMAND for quiet roosters. Any breeder who could develop a strain of quiet roosters would be doing a great service to the hobby, and helping to insure the survival of poultry keeping in an urban society.

Someone out there needs to try it!

--Michael

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#77486 - 07/06/07 05:18 PM Re: De-Crowing a Rooster
Hahnsberg Offline
Coop Cleaner

Registered: 03/06/05
Posts: 156
Loc: Texas
Michael,

I'm working on it, but this weather is not helping! I lost two of my roosters -- am now down to two, but thank goodness they are the best of the lot.

Richard

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#77487 - 07/06/07 06:42 PM Re: De-Crowing a Rooster
Michael TX Offline
Chicken

Registered: 12/24/04
Posts: 95
Loc: Texas
Hi Richard,

I know you are! I am just trying to get others to take up the challenge.

The weather HAS been terrible. I lost all my baby pheasants, and am even having trouble with some of my ringneck doves. Mosquito-born diseases are rampant.

Look for a private message from me.

--Michael

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#77488 - 07/07/07 12:50 AM Re: De-Crowing a Rooster
Uno Offline
Lord of the Fowl

Registered: 08/26/05
Posts: 1280
Loc: Canada
Here's a whacky thought: Botox. If it can paralyze your face, why not paralyze a voicebox? As long as a bird does not need his voice box to breathe or eat, maybe you should take him to a plastic surgeon.

I realize this is a serious situation you find yourself in but the problem of roosters and neigbours has come up time and time again. The surgical de-crowing looks like it doesn't work. But science is finding more and more uses for Botox, from facial applications to helping people with chronic muscle cramps.

If there are any scientific minded Coopers out there, this might be something to consider. And if it has been tried, how well did it or didn't it work? I think this is something I would like to see considered and discussed among people smarter than me (that's everyone)

Sorry you find yourself in the same place that many before you have wrestled with. There seems no good solution. frown

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