Page 2 of 2 < 1 2
Topic Options
#80713 - 07/25/03 02:19 PM Re: Turkey economics
Chickpine Offline
Chicken

Registered: 10/16/02
Posts: 149
Loc: Maine
I did get ahold of Bill Yockey after Rob gave me a couple of addresses a few weeks ago. I didn't know he was on RHT though (have been to busy recently to do any searches). I dislike Yahoo and like this site a LOT better because I don't have to spend 1/2 my time online trying not to look at ads. I have limited time to be online, doing research and it's like having a slow computer to have to wait to get through ads. Sorry for the whining back to turkeys..... I ordered 6 Midget Wht poults and assorted ??? to make up the shipment from Sand Hill for next spring and hope to drive to PA to get some from Bill this fall or next spring also. I like turkeys so I'm excited about this new adventure! Thanks for your help!

Top
#80714 - 07/28/03 10:23 AM Re: Turkey economics
Graciel Offline
Coop Keeper

Registered: 07/18/02
Posts: 423
Loc: New York
Dan, just wanted to mention that it's the Beltsvilles that are the double breasted birds, not the Midget Whites. I have a Beltsville tom and have had MWs and they are quite different. Both did come out of university programs for small birds, though.

Jennifer

Top
#80715 - 07/28/03 11:01 AM Re: Turkey economics
Chickpine Offline
Chicken

Registered: 10/16/02
Posts: 149
Loc: Maine
Graceil- I was under the impression (obviously mistaken) that the midgets and Beltsville had been interbred/combined /couldn't be told apart anymore. Can you refer me to a location for more info on the current status/ breeders of the Beltsville birds?

Top
#80716 - 07/28/03 11:50 AM Re: Turkey economics
Anonymous
Unregistered


Lol, open mouth ~ insert foot. wink
Thank you for the correction Graciel.
Dan

Top
#80717 - 07/29/03 03:41 PM Re: Turkey economics
Graciel Offline
Coop Keeper

Registered: 07/18/02
Posts: 423
Loc: New York
Chickpine, there probably has been crosses made, but I don't really think it's too common. The thing is, the Beltsvilles were blown out of the water by the Large Whites in the 1960's and became quite rare very quickly because they were a commercial bird that was replaced by another commercial bird. Turkeys were already gone from small flock operations by then, or fast going, so when the industry shifted suddenly, it was easy to have one variety eliminated in the blink of an eye in favour of another because all of the big turkey farms moved in lock step.

Another thing to consider is, if cross breeding did take place into the MWs, if you are just raising the birds casually the breast size would be reduced fast in the next generations. So if you had MWs and bred in a Beltsville and kept breeding back into the MWs, they would very quickly turn back into MWs. If you went the other direction, breeding the MWs into the Beltsville, you'd have to work harder to maintain that breast size. And no one was doing it anyway, because they didn't want that bird anymore when they had the Large Whites.

If you are on RHT, then look up Franklin Albertsen's posts on the Beltsville. His family has maintained a small flock of them since the mid 60's. There really isn't too much information on them anywhere, mainly because people insist on lumping the two varieties together. I think you can blame the APA for that because they list them as the same thing for showing. You can find the history of both breeds here and there, but that's about it. They were created about ten years apart at two different research farms. They really are quite different, though. The MW hen that I have left is a racey little bird. Definitely a small bird next to the other varieties in the turkey house. The Beltsville tom I have, in contrast, is chunky. You would never accuse him of being svelte. smile He's smaller framed than some, but there's a lot of meat on him. Quite frankly, the only thing that is like about those two birds is the white colour, and you can cover up anything in a turkey with the recessive white. It means nothing else about any of their other genetics. If either of the two varieties were bronze, for example, you'd never even consider them as being the same.

And Dan, I have a very large mouth created just from trying to insert and then remove my foot a little too often. wink

Jennifer

Top
#80718 - 07/30/03 04:26 AM Re: Turkey economics
Chickpine Offline
Chicken

Registered: 10/16/02
Posts: 149
Loc: Maine
Thanks for the info Graciel. I'll check out your references!

Top
#80719 - 08/02/03 07:32 AM Re: Turkey economics
Big Boy Offline
Ruler of the Roost

Registered: 07/17/02
Posts: 845
Loc: Kansas
Hello chickpine, Dan, and Graciel! Love turkeys. Graciel is quite right about the difference however I would add that the Beltesville Whites did not have the breeding problems possessed by the BB Whites. Either variety would be a nice-sized turkey for today's family size. What happened with the turkeys is the same thing that happened to the broiler industry when the Cornish crosses came into being: why bother with the mess and fuss of standard breds when you can do it through hybridization and prevent others from profiting from your labour.

Range feeding definitely is a plus if you can keep Blackhead at bay. I will make an educated guess and say that the costs during the spring-fall period can probably be halved for the older birds. The younger ones still need the hi-protein however. Good luck and congratulations on your choice!

Top
Page 2 of 2 < 1 2


Moderator:  Admin @ The Coop, Moderator2 
Who's Online
0 registered (), 61 Guests and 2 Spiders online.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Shout Box