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#8315 - 01/25/03 06:37 AM Freezing Combs
Anonymous
Unregistered


I have standard New Hampshires( Single Comb). They are in a ventilated, but draft free coop. At what temperature will I start experiencing (even minimal) comb freezing? Thanks for all replies in advance!

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#8316 - 01/25/03 07:41 AM Re: Freezing Combs
Susie Offline
Lord of the Fowl

Registered: 07/16/02
Posts: 1902
Loc: Arkansas
Paul,

I have read that frostbite on combs can start at only 30. Roosters tend to be more vulnerable than hens. And I don't know if one breed is more vulnerable than another or if it's an individual bird thing.

I do know that you can put vaseline on their combs to help protect them. Not sure how many birds you have and if that's even an idea that is possible for you.

Susie

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#8317 - 01/25/03 08:24 AM Re: Freezing Combs
Anonymous
Unregistered


i doubt this will be a problem except in extreme cold.
the points will turn dark first if you have a gradual cold wave. the blood gets congested here but the tissue lives.
we hear all sorts of things like vasiline on combe this will help a little bit as it will absolutely prevent evaporation (sweating) off the surface of the comb- try some on one hand on a chill morning. but if for show the box method (big cardbaord box, all corners sawed off for air) will bring them through a very cold night.
dont know the vigor of dthe hampshire but cockrels (thin comb) freeze first at about 10F ( several degrrees below 0 in celsius)the snow will be "crunchy" as you walk.

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#8318 - 01/27/03 04:18 PM Re: Freezing Combs
Anonymous
Unregistered


A Polish cock I have with quite pendulous wattles showed frost bite on the bottom third of his wattles (bloody and swollen) today after 15 below zero temps last night. Prior to this we were experiencing overnight averages of zero degrees but everybody was looking okay up until today. We have had single comb cocks in the past whose comb tips froze and atrophied in the past with no apparent ill effects but this case looks more severe. This is why I prefer breeds with pea or rose combs.
Any advise on how to treat the Polish cocks frost bite?
Thanks Much!

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#8319 - 01/27/03 08:17 PM Re: Freezing Combs
CJR Online   content
Coop Master

Registered: 07/16/02
Posts: 8489
Loc: Montana
The only frosted tips of combs I have ever allowed, was a bantam cockerel, 6 mos old, and the temperature in the coop was 27degrees. Never have let them get that cold again!

I am sure a number of breeds are much hardier to cold, as there are many posts of no problems at down to 10degrees. My birds would suffer badly, maybe to death, at that temperature. CJR

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#8320 - 01/28/03 04:38 AM Re: Freezing Combs
Anonymous
Unregistered


Here in South Dakota, we almost always see temps of thirty below. In 1994 I saw 54 on the barn thermometer.

Unlike CJR, we don't breed for show so we really don't care if a rooster is dubbed by the frostbite. Our roosters that have large combs will lose a goodly portion of those combs during winter. The frostbite just turns black and sloughs off. We've never had a problem with any health problem related to comb frostbite. We just accept it and the roosters seem no worse for the wear.

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#8321 - 01/28/03 05:11 AM Re: Freezing Combs
Anonymous
Unregistered


It has not been above freezing here for several weeks and last week it got down to -10 F twice. Our two RIR roosters have just a miniscule amount of frostbite on one or two tips of each of their combs. So far so good. They have no heat in the coop, but are draft free and dry.

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#8322 - 01/28/03 05:18 AM Re: Freezing Combs
Bonnie in IN Offline
Chicken

Registered: 09/23/02
Posts: 77
Loc: Indiana
-14 here the other night and One RI bantam has white on the bottom of his wattles. The tips of combs freeze at higher temps. My cages are in the barn and covered with plastic. I need a smaller room and more insulation.

SOMETHING TO REMEMBER: Severely frostbitten males will most likely loose their SEX DRIVE for a while (until the areas have healed). I have experienced this several times in the past 30 years. Standard breeds tend to be infertile longer than bantams.

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#8323 - 01/28/03 07:36 AM Re: Freezing Combs
J. Henderson Offline
Coop Keeper

Registered: 08/16/02
Posts: 674
Loc: New York
Only one of our roosters, an Andalusian, has had any frostbite problem, and we have had the longest cold streak I remember, with several below zero nights. If the Andalusian loses some sex drive for a while, I won't mind. His hen-defeathering randiness is the main reason the roosters are in separate quarters this winter.

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#8324 - 01/28/03 10:13 AM Re: Freezing Combs
Anonymous
Unregistered


last friday we had around -3, and my rooster who has a VERY large spiked rose comb, and really large wattles had the end of his spike completely black. I had him under two heat lamps, but he got out of the pen i had him in some how. I rubbed the comb starting with cold water and working up to warm, and that fixed everything except the very end and the very tip of the spike. The skin on top is dead in places, and i've been rubbing the intire comb with 1% iodine every night, and putting vaseline on it. The comb is starting to look better, but theres still a layer of yellow 'wax' like build up on the very end. Blood also seems to still be having trouble moving through the tip of the spike. His comb is very beautiful, and really cold weather is rare in south carolina. If i did have to remove his comb, how much trouble does any one think it would be?

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