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#8325 - 01/28/03 11:52 AM Re: Freezing Combs
Anonymous
Unregistered


I have heard that before (about roosters losing their sex drive if their combs are frostbitten), but that is not my experience. Two winters ago was particularly cold and the old Delaware cock was completely dubbed by frostbite - lost it all. And went on breeding as usual.

Now, what I have seen is the roosters don't want to breed when it is too cold. But that isn't due to frostbite.

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#8326 - 01/28/03 12:23 PM Re: Freezing Combs
Graciel Offline
Coop Keeper

Registered: 07/18/02
Posts: 423
Loc: New York
echo2, don't worry about doing anything to your roo's comb if you can't save it. It will simply dry up and fall off. Takes awhile, but it's dead tissue to the bird and the healing process walls off the dead from the living tissue, resulting in a nice, neat scar.

Jennifer

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#8327 - 01/28/03 12:41 PM Re: Freezing Combs
Rob Offline
Ruler of the Roost

Registered: 07/16/02
Posts: 783
Loc: Pennsylvania
I wonder if just trimming off that dead tissue, right away, would not alleviate some discomfort.??

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#8328 - 01/28/03 12:54 PM Re: Freezing Combs
Anonymous
Unregistered


Of course with our winters here, I've seen a lot of frostbitten combs and wattles - I don't have any reason to believe that it causes them any significant discomfort. At least, I don't notice any behavior that would indicate discomfort like trying to scratch at it.

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#8329 - 01/28/03 12:58 PM Re: Freezing Combs
Bonnie in IN Offline
Chicken

Registered: 09/23/02
Posts: 77
Loc: Indiana
Rob, if you cut the dead tissue off NOW, you get BLOOD and discomfort. If you let it dry up and fall aff there will be no blood and it seems as if no pain.

Many many years ago I went to a redneck farm where they were raising gamecocks. It was spring and the winter had been bad. I saw cocks walking on their elbows and the explanation was " their feet and legs froze". These birds were functioning and they had no feet and legs. It is just amaising what a chicken can do and endure and then there are those that fall down dead when you slam the barn door. smile

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#8330 - 01/28/03 05:04 PM Re: Freezing Combs
Rob Offline
Ruler of the Roost

Registered: 07/16/02
Posts: 783
Loc: Pennsylvania
You cxan call me a redneck too, but I couldnt have chooks with their feet an legs froze off!!. Dubbing seems ro cauxe no trauma, Ive dubbed year old birds and they go eat when put down. They wont lose that much blood, it looks like a lot tho. I sprinkle blood stop powder on the wounds

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#8331 - 01/28/03 07:28 PM Re: Freezing Combs
Anonymous
Unregistered


Call me a redneck along with Rob. Too many people just repeat, with authority, what they've heard or read without knowing if it is true or not. Indescretion to be sure.

Chickens are not humans and, although I tend to think of my hens as children and they sometimes act like it, they are not.

A child with frostbitten fingers goes to the physician.

A rooster or cockerel with frostbitten comb will get over it - just leave him alone. He won't be 'sexually' upset when the weather warms up enough to suit him. These are myths - yes, you can read these myths in the popular hobby literature. They are myths just the same. I am so arrogant as to dare say that we on this farm have more experience with this issue than most authors of those hobby books. Just leave him alone if you don't see any problem beyond the fact that his comb is black and is going to slough off. We have this all the time in South Dakota. We've never lost a cock yet to frostbite. They're better off for it. After their combs are gone, they are better adapted to the climate here. Good ridance.

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#8332 - 01/29/03 04:14 AM Re: Freezing Combs
Anonymous
Unregistered


Man, my last post sounds harsh! eek

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#8333 - 01/29/03 06:57 AM Re: Freezing Combs
Graciel Offline
Coop Keeper

Registered: 07/18/02
Posts: 423
Loc: New York
No, Leee, I didn't think so. I got a few Leghorn birds this past year and really admired those huge combs on the roos, but I KNEW that come spring they are going to be a lot shorter than they were last fall. It's too bad, but that's the way things go where it's cold.

Jennifer

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#8334 - 01/29/03 07:44 AM Re: Freezing Combs
Big Boy Offline
Ruler of the Roost

Registered: 07/17/02
Posts: 845
Loc: Kansas
Yeah, Rob and Leee, you are too right. My Leghorns are kept warm enough that they don't get frost-bite too bad but they still have their points kinda 'rounded-off'. The orpingtons have big combs as well (not as big as Leghorns, of course) but they really don't seem to be as affected as the Mediterranean fowl.

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