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#86065 - 07/24/06 08:50 PM HELP! Heat killing chicken
Anonymous
Unregistered


I have an houdan pullet. I think she laid her first egg today. At 8:00 I found her laying down looking quite heat-distressed. The heat here has been awful since last week. We put her in a bath to get her temp down and got some water down her. I have her inside in the hospital coop laying o a towel. Her eyes are open and she keeps opening her beak wide for a second then closing it. Is there anything else I can do for this girl?

Olivia Grace

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#86066 - 07/24/06 10:16 PM Re: HELP! Heat killing chicken
Jrsygntbrdr1 Offline
Classroom Professor

Registered: 06/12/05
Posts: 2601
Loc: Arkansas
Take her inside to an air-conditioned area? That's the only thing I can think of other than placing an IV in her. Keep her area dark, and cool. Is she the only one you have?

Mikaela

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#86067 - 07/25/06 04:50 AM Re: HELP! Heat killing chicken
Susie Offline
Lord of the Fowl

Registered: 07/16/02
Posts: 1902
Loc: Arkansas
You did exactly the right thing. I have had chickens recover from what looked like near death from heat, so be hopeful. You might feed her some cold treats - like tomato pieces or something like that. Otherwise, you're doing all you can.

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#86068 - 07/25/06 09:03 AM Re: HELP! Heat killing chicken
Anonymous
Unregistered


UPDATE & QUESTION: She is still alive this morning. She's sleeping. She hasn't eatten anything and I doubt she has the strength to drink.

I have her sister who is fine. I did not put the sister in the hospital coop with her because this girl seems to really need her rest. When she shows enough signs of recovering, I'll put them together.

I've read NOT to force anything including water down an injured chick: should I get some water down her?

Thanks for all the help.

Olivia Grace

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#86069 - 07/25/06 09:49 AM Re: HELP! Heat killing chicken
Susie Offline
Lord of the Fowl

Registered: 07/16/02
Posts: 1902
Loc: Arkansas
Have you tried dribbling some water on her beak? Sometimes they instinctively raise their head and swallow. It is a little risky to try to force water in them. It's really easy to get it down the wrong pipe. If you really want to try, you can gently pry her beak open and squirt a little water in her mouth and give her the opportunity to swallow. If you try to squirt it down her throat, there could be problems if you aren't experienced with it. When I've had to force liquids because of botulism or something similar, I've tried to just put a few drops in their mouth and let them do the swallowing.

What about water-filled treats? Like fruit, melons, tomato or something like that? Does she show any interest in a special treat?

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#86070 - 07/25/06 10:17 AM Re: HELP! Heat killing chicken
CJR Online   content
Coop Master

Registered: 07/16/02
Posts: 8483
Loc: Montana
I, too, resist force feeding or watering any chick or chicken. However, with Botulism poisoning, (one year I had two birds affected), I used a curved glass eyedropper, and water can be administered right into the crop, slow--slide it down one side of the throat. It is still scarey,-- but important to flush the crop with Botulism poisoing!

So far, with our 100f temperatures, the birds have not suffered and have remained active. (me, too, checking and refilling waterers in every pen!) Another week of it is forecast--and who knows what then??....... I love fall and winter, even
-30f! CJR

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#86071 - 07/25/06 05:04 PM Re: HELP! Heat killing chicken
Bill Ludwig Offline
Classroom Professor

Registered: 07/17/02
Posts: 2582
Loc: Ohio
I don't know what your set up is but I have a covered (shaded) run and I will wet it down with the garded hose to help keep everyone cool. No mud or puddles, just damp. I agree with the water filled treats. Cool water melon is a big hit on hot days. As with any treats, just offer enough that it will be eaten shortly and not lay around to spoil. Good luck!

Bill

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#86072 - 07/25/06 08:49 PM Re: HELP! Heat killing chicken
Fowl Lover Offline
Coop Keeper

Registered: 08/24/05
Posts: 532
Loc: Nebraska
If it was heat sickness she needs the fluid but indeed may be too weak to drink. I had a rooster with a head injury, too sleepy to drink from water bowl. I used a syringe (10ml is a nice easy size to hold in the hand and requires less refilling than a smaller size). I held his head in the position it would be if he were walking around and dripped water on his beak to make sure he was able/willing to swallow. If she passes this test you can slowly run water on her beak and she should take it. This way you aren't actually forcing it down her throat and risking getting it in her lungs but you will be assisting her with what she seems to be too weak to do herself. Give her as much at a time as she will take and do this several times a day. Chickens prefer cool water for drinking so I'd recommend that. Good luck!

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#86073 - 07/26/06 09:37 AM Re: HELP! Heat killing chicken
Anonymous
Unregistered


She's better! I had a curved syringe in my first aid kit and dribbled water into her beak. She was a floppy, very sleepy bird, but the first time I got maybe an 18th of a teaspoon down her. It helped. An hour later she seemed to know it was helping. She didn't swallow, she just seemed to let it slide down. The third dose she swallowed a bit. This morning she stood up for about 30 seconds. I put a tiny piece of grape in her mouth and she ate! She is on the mend thanks to our group effort. Thank you and thank you again!

I'll keep her inside for another day and watch her. I have a little coop inside her aviary for peeps and she and her sister can stay in there if she needs a few extra days to regain her strength before rejoining her flock. The weather has cooled here and my girls are quite happy again. What a relief.

Olivia Grace

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#86074 - 07/26/06 11:05 AM Re: HELP! Heat killing chicken
Deb AZ Offline
Coop Keeper

Registered: 09/26/03
Posts: 452
Loc: Arizona
Olivia I am here in Arizona and we are hot and the fowl have the hardest time. One of the things we need to remember is fowl already run a very high body temperature along with the fact they are avian and do not release body heat as mammels do, their internal temperature guage is different. They don't swet. Two things happen it is hard on their heart and they literally cook from the inside out.
When I see a fowl which shows signs of heat stress, listless, unusual fatigue, imobile, pale I immediately emerce the fool in tepid water. Same principal as reducing a high fever in a human. You want to reduce their body heat which due to the stress at this point they are not able to do.
One of the concerns you may have due to your location, is high humidity so air flow is a must. We are dealing with high humidity along with 110 temps but the lights winds are helping the fowl to endure.

Deb

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