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#86219 - 06/14/07 11:44 AM Blind rooster!!
Cranberry Creek Offline
Coop Cleaner

Registered: 11/18/05
Posts: 211
Loc: Canada
Okay heres what happened: I normally let out some of my chickens every evening or so, and this particular night two of my roosters (from different pens) met each-other and started to fight. One was a Barred Rock and the other was a Black Red game. I was approaching them to break it up and move one or the other when the game rooster got hit in the eye bye the other and fell onto his back, apparently stunned. So I quickly scooped him up and took a look at the damage I quickly determined that the eye would be of no use after the incident. So I moved him in to a confinment cage out of the noise and so on.

My real problem is that he hasn't been able to see out of his opposite eye since the accident!

It is clear and healthy looking but remains un-focused and useless!


Please if you have had experience with anything like this or know the answer I would really appreciate it!

Roman.

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#86220 - 06/14/07 11:49 AM Re: Blind rooster!!
Cranberry Creek Offline
Coop Cleaner

Registered: 11/18/05
Posts: 211
Loc: Canada
I have a black austrolorp hen that is now seemingly constipated, every once in a while it will crouch down and cluck loudly, then nothing will happen and it will start to move again.

At first I thought it was trying to lay an egg but that just doesn't click and besides it hasn't laid an egg in more then a year.

Also it has some kind of worm that sometimes comes out in the fecal matter. it is small and white.

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#86221 - 06/14/07 03:15 PM Re: Blind rooster!!
Anonymous
Unregistered


Regarding the blind rooster, are you sure he is blind in his good eye? A chicken's eyes are positioned on his head so that he cannot focus on an object directly in front of him with both eyes at the same time. In other words, there is a blind spot directly in front of him. Because of this, he will only be able to see in one dimension. That's the reason why chickens will "bob" their heads - it permits them to view the world in 3-D. Perhaps your guy is having a hard time adjusting to not being able to judge distances and perspectives as he once did?

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#86222 - 06/15/07 02:02 AM Re: Blind rooster!!
Foehn Offline
Administrator
Lord of the Fowl

Registered: 08/08/06
Posts: 1968
Loc: New Zealand
Sounds like you need to treat your Australorp for worms. If the worm is small, whitish and shaped like a pencil lead but pointed both ends, it is likely to be roundworm. Your hen may be trying to rid herself of bowel irritation caused by the worms when she sits and looks like she is trying to push things out. See your vet, or animal remedy stockist for something suitable for poultry worms. I use Ivomec, as recommended by my vet, (˝mL per bird by beak) but there are differing views I've read as to whether it is the best wormer to use. If you have one hen with worms, then it is most likely all your poultry will have them and they should all be treated, but that's your call. I have seen something mentioned within these pages for putting in the drinking water, but sorry I can't remember what it is called, or how good it is, but others may be able to recommend something.

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#86223 - 06/15/07 06:14 AM Re: Blind rooster!!
Cranberry Creek Offline
Coop Cleaner

Registered: 11/18/05
Posts: 211
Loc: Canada
Thanks alot for the advice. Foehn I will definately check out thease round worms because they seem to match the discription.


Sunchicks, I am quite sure he is totally blind, he mostly walks in circles and is very clumsy often bumping into things. I put my finger up to his good eye to see if there would be any reaction. There was not. He was quite a skidish rooster before, but now he doesn't respond until you actually make contact with him.

Roman

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#86224 - 06/15/07 10:57 AM Re: Blind rooster!!
Greta S. Offline
Coop Cleaner

Registered: 01/21/05
Posts: 232
Loc: California
If he just walks in circles, he may have a neurological problem and/or a spinal or brain injury. The inability to focus the eye can also stem from this type of thing. As a wildlife rehabilitator, I sometimes see this in animals that have sustained trauma, particularly being hit by a car. Sometimes they will recover on their own, sometimes not.

This may or may not be the case with your rooster, it's very hard to make a diagnosis without actually seeing your bird. Either way, good luck with him!

~Greta S

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