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#89075 - 04/23/10 07:00 PM Egg Production
Sandy Maran Offline
New Egg

Registered: 04/22/10
Posts: 1
Loc: Florida
I have 26 chickens, and I was averaging about 18 eggs a day. The last few days production is down to 9 to 12 eggs. What can be the cause of this?

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#89081 - 04/24/10 11:22 AM Re: Egg Production [Re: Sandy Maran]
CJR Online   content
Coop Master

Registered: 07/16/02
Posts: 8489
Loc: Montana
Breed, age, (hens/pullets) change of feed--or routine--each flock is a little different, according to management, but these are some normal interruptions in numbers of eggs.

CJR

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#89087 - 04/24/10 10:50 PM Re: Egg Production [Re: CJR]
Morcar Offline
Chick

Registered: 03/31/10
Posts: 17
Loc: California
I've had chickens for only about 10 years, but I've definitely noticed changes in egg laying (as in "drop in egg laying") when there is a change of some sort, like CJR mentioned. With my bantams, all I had to do was clean out their laying box (much less clean out the whole hen house), and that was the end of eggs for almost a week. Change in weather would do it too, particularly stormy, windy, etc.; i.e., abrupt, noticeable, something significant in the change of weather.

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#89095 - 04/25/10 10:23 PM Re: Egg Production [Re: Morcar]
Foehn Offline
Administrator
Lord of the Fowl

Registered: 08/08/06
Posts: 1968
Loc: New Zealand
Hens deciding to go broody will also change laying patterns.

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#89096 - 04/26/10 12:33 AM Re: Egg Production [Re: Foehn]
Wieslaw Offline
Moderator
Classroom Professor

Registered: 09/18/09
Posts: 3768
Loc: Denmark
Diseases can definitely cause a sudden drop in egg production. In fact, the sudden drop can be the first sign of many infectious diseases, which can go unnoticed at the beginning.

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#89177 - 05/04/10 07:39 PM Re: Egg Production [Re: Wieslaw]
Rooster Dude Offline
Feather

Registered: 05/03/10
Posts: 23
Loc: Texas
Probably the molting stage of their life. Could also say they are going broody.

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#89786 - 06/14/10 07:22 PM Re: Egg Production [Re: Rooster Dude]
Poultry Doc Offline
Feather

Registered: 06/11/10
Posts: 37
Loc: Idaho
It may be late, but I'd like to share my article on "How to Increase Egg Production." I hope it helps.

http://freepoultryconsultant.blogspot.com/2010/06/checklist-on-how-to-improve-egg.html

Poultry Doc

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#89809 - 06/15/10 09:39 PM Re: Egg Production [Re: Poultry Doc]
Rogo Offline
Coop Keeper

Registered: 12/05/03
Posts: 469
Loc: Arizona
Perhaps there's something in our water! :o)

My birds lay very well for 8-10 years before they slow down. Fertility and egg production are high and doesn't go down much during the moult. I've had no egg bound hens. They've had no prolapses. Their chicks are healthy. I haven't had a sick bird in the 13 years I've had poultry.

I don't vaccinate. The birds roam free on the acreage. No coop. They free choice feed. I've experimented with menus throughout the years, and the fertility and egg laying have always been high. I've always mixed food grade diatomaceous earth (DE) in the feed. It prevents sickness and diseases and has 28 trace minerals.

The last few years I've been feeding Strongpoint dog food, beef and lamb based. No BHT, no BHA, no ethoxyquin, no soy, no corn, no wheat, and no overseas ingredients. Hay is always available. Excess eggs are thrown on the ground to break for the birds.

Six months of the year the sun temperatures here are in the hundreds. Today's reported temperature was 107 degrees F. The reported temperatures are taken in the shade. The temperatures in the sun are 10 to 15 degrees higher, but it's a dry heat! It rarely rains here. The weather has no effect on my bird's egg laying, even when later this summer the sun temperatures will be in the 130s; it's life as usual!

Happy campers here in central Arizona.

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#89854 - 06/17/10 09:09 PM Re: Egg Production [Re: Rogo]
Dirt Road Offline
Bantam

Registered: 08/18/08
Posts: 61
Loc: Idaho
Hens laying for 8-10 years before slowing down?
Hens which continue to lay right through the moult?
Hens whose egg production is totally un-effected by weather?
I suspect there is something in your water all right but me-thinks it was added in the glass!
Keep up the good work on your strain of chickens. They'll be in high demand once the word gets out.

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#89856 - 06/18/10 12:57 AM Re: Egg Production [Re: Dirt Road]
Rogo Offline
Coop Keeper

Registered: 12/05/03
Posts: 469
Loc: Arizona

My results are not unusual. And the breed of birds doesn't matter. I know many around here with the same results. One gal has a couple of 19 year old birds who still periodically drop an egg.

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#89870 - 06/18/10 11:31 AM Re: Egg Production [Re: Sandy Maran]
Poultry Doc Offline
Feather

Registered: 06/11/10
Posts: 37
Loc: Idaho
Is your egg production back to normal already? In my many years of servicing farms, the most common causes of sudden drop in eggs are 1. feed alteration and 2. diseases. Feed alteration will manifest fast because the whole flock is experiencing the change en-masse, thus its effect will be seen in total eggs. Common culprits here are calcium content decrease and change in feed major ingredient which puzzled the birds' stomach. On the other hand, the diseases which commonly cause major drop in eggs usually start with drop in feed consumption which will shortly result into egg drop. Most of these diseases are showing respiratory signs in the beginning.

Thanks.

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#89876 - 06/18/10 03:52 PM Re: Egg Production [Re: Poultry Doc]
Jocelyn Offline
Lord of the Fowl

Registered: 08/26/02
Posts: 1467
Loc: Canada
Nothing in the water, grin. Dotty will be 20 if she makes it to the second of August. She is in a breeding pen now and I have eggs in the incubator. I suspect they will hatch this year too. Because we have had production layers so long, we all sometimes forget other birds have different genetics...not so many eggs all at once, but eggs for many years. Dotty is quechua, from South America....think ameraucana like, but a landrace, not bred to our standards. Landraces tend to be tough and long lived.

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#90543 - 07/22/10 12:26 AM Re: Egg Production [Re: Jocelyn]
Foehn Offline
Administrator
Lord of the Fowl

Registered: 08/08/06
Posts: 1968
Loc: New Zealand
20 years seems pretty old for a bird until one remembers that parrots are capable of 50+ years.
My oldest birds are rising 7, so still in their youth by your mature bird Jocelyn smile

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#94525 - 02/14/11 06:23 PM Re: Egg Production [Re: Foehn]
Ratbird Offline
Flock Leader

Registered: 05/18/03
Posts: 324
Loc: California
I lost most of my 7 year olds last year. I'm down to one 8 year old now in the old girl stakes......... 20 is incredible.

I took an ailing (cancer) bird into the vet a couple of years ago and she said that they can live past 6 (my birds age) but she does not often see it.

What is a typical "old age"?

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#94552 - 02/15/11 09:04 AM Re: Egg Production [Re: Ratbird]
Wieslaw Offline
Moderator
Classroom Professor

Registered: 09/18/09
Posts: 3768
Loc: Denmark
What is the definition of 'old age' in birds(and generally?)?

In the wild birds the longevity is usually correlated with the birds size. Larger birds live usually longer( also in captivity) than small birds.But there are exceptions(arctic tern). Birds of the size of a chicken can live in captivity between 20-30 years. A 27 years old mallard was shot in the wild, and 60 years old grey heron.

Long time ago I read about an experiment in the US. They started with a flock of 200 or 300 white Leghorns , which lived without any intervention(culling). After 11 years(when the experiment was stopped) there was still around 30 birds living, laying on average 30 eggs a year.

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#94558 - 02/15/11 11:55 AM Re: Egg Production [Re: Wieslaw]
CJR Online   content
Coop Master

Registered: 07/16/02
Posts: 8489
Loc: Montana
Interesting, if you look at just one life-factor of the birds that have the longest estimated lifetimes. Exercise! That 30 year old banded Arctic Tern had flown, maybe, a million miles in its lifetime! Bet those Leghorns were not tightly confined? Born free.....allows few advantages in this competative world, but we can certainly help our poultry live longer and more productive lives by a type of confinement that allows a lot of free exercise, flight and exploration for the things that chickens like to scratch for!.
Because most of my bantams are for sale, after I have a few generations from the best of them, people are waiting for them, and off they go to do well for another breeder. I have only kept one productive cock for 9 years (brought him from Holland) and he spent several more years before a mishap,in Texas. I now have 3 hens, one still laying, that are 9 years old. They are very active, look like pullets, and will STAY with me! (I am older and having a hard time with exercise!) CJR

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#94562 - 02/15/11 12:38 PM Re: Egg Production [Re: Ratbird]
Rogo Offline
Coop Keeper

Registered: 12/05/03
Posts: 469
Loc: Arizona

=== I took an ailing (cancer) bird into the vet a couple of years ago and she said that they can live past 6 (my birds age) but she does not often see it. ===


A vet that sees poultry? Not around here. Not even the avian vets. Altho I haven't had a sick bird in all the years I've had poultry, I've asked the vets why they don't see them. They said it doesn't make sense for folks to pay a vet a lot of money for something that can be replaced to inexpensively!

Perhaps your vet hasn't seen older poultry due to many not taking them to a vet.

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