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#11363 - 12/19/09 09:12 AM Infectious coryza
Langshan Girl Offline
Bantam

Registered: 12/14/08
Posts: 60
Loc: Wisconsin
I haven't been on the board for a while and hope everyone is doing well smile

I am hoping to get some help with a problem I am having. I have reoccurring outbreaks of infectious coryza in my flock.

I work with two poultry vets and am friends with another, and all are in agreement that it's corzya. One of them gave me injectable batril to use during outbreaks, but I hate using antibiotics. I get an outbreak every few months. I get less egg, spend money on antibiotics, the birds suffer and I am getting frustrated. The coryza only seems to effect my bantam brahmas. My langshans and samutras seem to be naturally resistant or at least don't show any clinical signs (with the exception of three langshans that were not from my bloodline.)

I heard there is a vaccine for infectious coryza. Has anyone ever used this vaccine before? If so which one and was it worth it?

The vets I work with unfortunately aren't able to help. They say they don't know much about the vaccine or were to get it. They work with large turkey producers.

Any other advice would be much appreciated!
Thanks and Happy Holidays!

Langshangirl

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#11364 - 12/30/09 08:10 PM Re: Infectious coryza
Langshan Girl Offline
Bantam

Registered: 12/14/08
Posts: 60
Loc: Wisconsin
Ok...maybe more basic questions-

Does anyone vaccinate for anything?

Does anyone have have problems with coryza?

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#11365 - 12/30/09 09:13 PM Re: Infectious coryza
Foehn Offline
Administrator
Lord of the Fowl

Registered: 08/08/06
Posts: 1968
Loc: New Zealand
Here's a bit of information that you may or may not know. From what I read of the vaccine, it doesn't produce lifelong immunity and needs to be topped up each year. Think that would become costly.

Scroll down to the appropriate paragraph
HHH web page

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#11366 - 12/31/09 07:44 AM Re: Infectious coryza
Langshan Girl Offline
Bantam

Registered: 12/14/08
Posts: 60
Loc: Wisconsin
Thanks Foehn!

The article confirms much of what I've heard about the vaccine, and it doesn't seem like it's worth it.

However, The article was written in 2006. I was told in the last couple years they may have improved the vaccine so that it required only one or two initial doses and provided better resistance. The vet that told me this wasn't certain if that was true, and I am beginning to think not since I can't find any information on it.

There are several families along with myself that go in together for the pulorum antigen for blood testing, and many of these families have had problems with coryza as well. We all provide lots of chicks for the 4-H kids. If there was a good vaccine out there that only required one or two doses, it could be worth while for all of us to purchase a bottle together to make it more cost effective. I think I am dreaming smile

Thanks and Happy New Year!

Langshangirl

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#11367 - 12/31/09 12:50 PM Re: Infectious coryza
Foehn Offline
Administrator
Lord of the Fowl

Registered: 08/08/06
Posts: 1968
Loc: New Zealand
Yes, this information on Coryza-vac tends to make it look effective.
Coryza-vac

I note it also looks like it is designed for older young birds

Happy new year to you also. We are already in 2010

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#88171 - 02/11/10 02:43 PM Re: Infectious coryza [Re: Langshan Girl]
Wieslaw Offline
Moderator
Classroom Professor

Registered: 09/18/09
Posts: 3751
Loc: Denmark
Infectious Coryza is caused by bacteria Haemophilus paragallinarum, which, according to different written sources, only lives outside the chickens for 2-3 days. On the other hand, the birds that recovered are usually lifelong carriers. As the infection is not transmitted by eggs, the solution to the problem can be to put many eggs in an incubator and to get rid of the old birds. (I admit it can sound drastic.) The course of the disease you described is the norm (reoccurring outbreaks).

What happened to my birds is totally different. 5-6 years ago I bought a hen. (I will NEVER do it again.) I picked her myself from a flock of 15 birds. As they all looked very healthy, I didnít quarantine her. Already the next day she got ill. (Transporting birds can trigger the outbreak.) Each single bird got infected, including my main breeding rooster. They all survived. The only bird I culled was the bird I bought, as she seemed to become chronicly ill.

Iím 100% sure that it was coryza because of the unmistakable smell. What I canít explain is why not one bird from the following generations got infected? I didnít use any treatment, not to mention antibiotics. None of the birds were immune (obviously), and they all were possible carriers. The birds I had at that time were Leghorns and Minorcas. The vets here know practically nothing about diseases of the poultry, so I canít ask anybody for a possible explanation.

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#90247 - 07/06/10 05:31 AM Re: Infectious coryza [Re: Wieslaw]
Sigi Offline
Ruler of the Roost

Registered: 11/23/06
Posts: 1150
Loc: Holland
Old topic revisited.
I have also reoccuring Coryza but only in the young birds.
As if its a children's disease and I treat it similar.
Most have only one eye closed, not breathing problems no snot.
Others start immediately having trouble in breathing, I can inject with baytril but it won't work.
Birds which did not get this as a kid can catch it later with more dramatic symptoms like snot, sneezing, watery eyes, eyes both closed, overall feeling horrible.
Those I give aspirine first and I clean the eyes so they are open again several times a day.
If I don't want to loose it I give it a baytril injection.
Otherwise it should become better again itself. Such a bird, if it becomes well will never have Coryza again.

I sometimes think about infecting the other growing pens so I have all the sick kids at once in 1-2 weeks and then I am free of it in those birds.
It's almost not to prevent if you attend shows or buy chickens from outside which I do.
When somebody buys chickens from me I always tell they are carrying coryza, most say: I've it too now and then, its okay.

Does anybody has this 'children disease' effect in his/her birds?
So when they get it at young age (not severe symptoms) they won't get it for the rest of their lives?

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