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#107767 - 01/14/13 03:37 PM Re: Avian leucosis, Marek's & other diseases [Re: jonnydot]
Wieslaw Offline
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You have asked the correct place, but it is not sure you will get an answer right now. I think people who keep recessive whites should be asked to express their opinion on general health and longevity of the birds, whether they observed something 'suspect'compared to other birds.

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#107775 - 01/15/13 04:27 AM Re: Avian leucosis, Marek's & other diseases [Re: Wieslaw]
ssc Offline
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Registered: 08/07/11
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Loc: uk
Could some strains of Copper Black Marans carry recessive white?

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#107787 - 01/15/13 04:25 PM Re: Avian leucosis, Marek's & other diseases [Re: ssc]
Wieslaw Offline
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Originally Posted By: ssc
Could some strains of Copper Black Marans carry recessive white?


Why not? There are recessive white Marans.

Here is another horror, this time with Marek's

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21320336

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#108268 - 02/01/13 05:05 PM Re: Avian leucosis, Marek's & other diseases [Re: Wieslaw]
Wieslaw Offline
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#109438 - 04/24/13 03:47 PM Re: Avian leucosis, Marek's & other diseases [Re: Wieslaw]
Wieslaw Offline
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I have found an easy to understand abstract.

Quote:

Institute for Animal Health, Compton, Newbury, Berks, RG20 7NN, United Kingdom

ABSTRACT

Three species of avian retrovirus cause disease in poultry: the avian leukosis/sarcoma virus
(ALSV), reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV), and lymphoproliferative disease virus (LPDV) of turkeys. The
ALSV can be classified as slowly transforming viruses, which lack a viral oncogene, and acutely transforming
viruses, which possess a viral oncogene. Slowly transforming viruses induce late onset leukoses of the B cell
lymphoid, erythroid, and myeloid cell lineages, and other tumors, by viral promoter insertion into the
genome of a host cell and activation of a cellular protooncogene. The various acutely transforming leukemia and sarcoma viruses induce leukotic or other tumors rapidly and carry one or another (sometimes two) viral oncogenes, of which some 15 have been identified. The ALSV fall into six envelope subgroups, A through E, and the recently recognized J subgroup, which induces myeloid leukosis. With the exception of Subgroup E viruses, these viruses spread vertically and horizontally as infectious virions, and are termed exogenous viruses. Subgroup E viruses are usually spread genetically as DNA proviruses (often defective) in host germ cell genome, and are termed endogenous viruses. Several other families of endogenous viruses also exist, one of which, endogenous avian retrovirus (EAV), is related to Subgroup J ALV. Exogenous viruses, and sometimes endogenous viruses, can have detrimental effects on commercially important production traits. Exogenous viruses are currently controlled by virus eradication schemes. Reticuloendotheliosis virus, which lacks a viral oncogene, causes chronic B cell and T-cell lymphomas in chickens, and also chronic lymphomas in turkeys and other species of birds. An acutely transforming variant of REV, Strain T, carries a viral oncogene, and induces reticuloendotheliosis within a few days. In chickens and turkeys, REV spreads vertically and horizontally. No commercial control schemes are operated. In turkeys, LPDV infection has occurred in several countries, where it caused a lymphoproliferative disease of uncertain nature

It is from here:

http://www.poultryscience.org/ps/paperpdfs/98/ps981204.pdf

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#111531 - 01/24/14 05:11 AM Re: Avian leucosis, Marek's & other diseases [Re: Wieslaw]
Wieslaw Offline
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A propos recessive white viral insertion: I have read, that it is inserted "backwards"(provided I understood correctly), thus should not make a bird more succeptible to avian leucosis(?)

Here is another interesting link

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8202427

Quote:
Male-mediated venereal transmission of endogenous avian leukosis virus.
Smith EJ, Fadly AM.
Author information USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Avian Disease and Oncology Laboratory, East Lansing, Michigan 48823.

Abstract

Congenital transmission of avian leukosis viruses (ALV) occurs readily through the egg, but transmission of ALV through male seminal fluid is considered to be nonexistent or rare. Progeny from mating endogenous late-feathering (LF), K/k+ males carrying an endogenous virus gene (ev21) with virgin early-feathering (EF) k+/w females were examined for the presence of infectious endogenous virus EV21 using an enzyme-labeled immunoassay for viral capsid antigen p27. All 177 LF chicks expressed EV21, p27, and 171 of 175 EF chicks did not express p27. Blood from the four p27-positive EF chicks revealed only infectious Subgroup E ALV as determined by subgroup-specific virus assays. Southern blot DNA hybridizations, however, ruled out germline integration of EV21 among the four infected EF progeny. Virus EV21 was not shed in albumens of the dams. Moreover, antibodies against ALV Subgroups A and E were not detected in dams 17 wk after the first insemination. Chicks infected with EV21 were found only in the first two of six hatches. Data suggested direct infection of the embryos from viremic semen rather than congenital infection through infected hens. Direct male transmission of EV21 to progeny may be the basis for persistence of refractory lines noted in some ALV eradication programs. Based on the absence of recombinants among 352 progeny, ev21 and K appear to be less than .3 cM apart.

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#111593 - 01/30/14 12:39 AM Re: Avian leucosis, Marek's & other diseases [Re: Wieslaw]
Redcap Online   content
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Registered: 08/14/06
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In the meanwhile it is known, that infection or reinfection can happen in adult chicken
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17039834
or even in turkeys
http://veterinaryrecord.bmj.com/content/171/23/602.1.extract
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11918050

Therefore is has been suggest to revaccinate chicken - best results can be reached with homologous vaccines
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2643530/
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#116907 - 11/09/17 02:57 PM Re: Avian leucosis, Marek's & other diseases [Re: Redcap]
Wieslaw Offline
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A new article on avian influenza

Identifying the genetic basis for resistance to avian influenza in commercial egg layer chickens
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29103391

Abstract

Two highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) outbreaks have affected commercial egg production flocks in the American continent in recent years; a H7N3 outbreak in Mexico in 2012 that caused 70% to 85% mortality and a H5N2 outbreak in the United States in 2015 with over 99% mortality. Blood samples were obtained from survivors of each outbreak and from age and genetics matched non-affected controls. A total of 485 individuals (survivors and controls) were genotyped with a 600 k single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array to detect genomic regions that influenced the outcome of highly pathogenic influenza infection in the two outbreaks. A total of 420458 high quality, segregating SNPs were identified across all samples. Genetic differences between survivors and controls were analyzed using a logistic model, mixed models and a Bayesian variable selection approach. Several genomic regions potentially associated with resistance to HPAI were identified, after performing multidimensional scaling and adjustment for multiple testing. Analysis conducted within each outbreak identified different genomic regions for resistance to the two virus strains. The strongest signals for the Iowa H5N2 survivor samples were detected on chromosomes 1, 7, 9 and 15. Positional candidate genes were mainly coding for plasma membrane proteins with receptor activity and were also involved in immune response. Three regions with the strongest signal for the Mexico H7N3 samples were located on chromosomes 1 and 5. Neuronal cell surface, signal transduction and immune response proteins coding genes were located in the close proximity of these regions.


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#116909 - 11/10/17 04:51 PM Re: Avian leucosis, Marek's & other diseases [Re: Wieslaw]
Wieslaw Offline
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Registered: 09/18/09
Posts: 3757
Loc: Denmark
Livestock and poultry density and childhood cancer incidence in nine states in the USA.


https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28858758

Abstract
BACKGROUND:
Parental occupational and childhood exposures to farm animals have been positively associated with childhood brain tumors, whereas associations with childhood leukemia are equivocal. The developing immune system may be influenced by allergen, virus, or other exposures from animal sources, which may contribute to childhood cancer incidence.

RESULTS:
We found positive associations between AML and broiler chicken densities (RRper 10AU/km2 = 1.14, 95% CI = 1.02-1.26). ALL rates increased with densities of hog operations (RRper operation/100km2 = 1.06, 95% CI = 1.02-1.11). PNS cancer rates were inversely associated with layer chicken density (RRper log of AU/km2 = 0.94, 95% CI = 0.89-0.99). No association was found between any cancer type and densities of cattle, equine, or goats

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#116912 - 11/13/17 11:55 AM Re: Avian leucosis, Marek's & other diseases [Re: Wieslaw]
Redcap Online   content
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Registered: 08/14/06
Posts: 951
Loc: Germany
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