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#9692 - 11/22/07 11:11 PM Bloodspots
Uno Offline
Lord of the Fowl

Registered: 08/26/05
Posts: 1280
Loc: Canada
I know I've brought this up before: the dreaded blood spot. I've read here that they occur in only a small percentage of eggs. I just don't believe it! It is safe to say that they occur in 80% or more of my eggs! It is making me crazy! I hate them! They give me the willies. I am ashamed to sell these freaky eggs to anyone. I warn people about the UFOs (unidentified floating objects) that they are likely to encounter in my eggs. Tonight while making dinner I cracked three into a bowl, and every single one had a glitch in it!

Enough already! These birds live in heated comfort. Get a balanced lay pellet, scratch, plus vegetable scraps and get let out to roam when the hawks are away. They are powdered for beasties and treated for worms once in a while. The hen house is decorated tastefully with locally produced plywood and sided in only the best cedar board and batten. Attractive art hangs on the walls. I shovel up the poo when it gets stinky and sprinkle stuff to absorb stink and moisture. I even dust the place with a duster when I clean, no cobwebs in my henhouse. You'd think they'd find it in their hearts to lay eggs that don't have boogers in them.

Does anyone have the inside track on the cause and cure of rampant blood spots? I set 13 eggs in the incubator and only 2 have made it to the halfway point. I am willing to bet that it is blood spot related. If anyone knows anything, I'm all ears. (eyes?) smile

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#9693 - 11/23/07 02:36 AM Re: Bloodspots
Foehn Offline
Administrator
Lord of the Fowl

Registered: 08/08/06
Posts: 1968
Loc: New Zealand
Uno, I don't profess to know the cause of bloodspots, I just know I don't get them in my eggs, so by a process of elimination, you may arrive at or near a possible cause.
1. Do you always breed your own replacements?
Yes, may mean it's genetic. No, environmental.
Things you could try. 1. Isolate the hens which don't produce bloodspots and try breeding replacements from them only. At least then you could over time produce hens less likely to leave these spots in the eggs. Use an unrelated rooster over the new line. 2. Buy your replacements as eggs from a reputable breeder and introduce a new line, then eliminate the old line.

Things environmental may be less easy to identify, let alone resolve. Although I doubt it is in any way related to the rooster, you could try stopping him mating with your hens over a few months and see if there is a difference.

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#9694 - 11/23/07 05:21 AM Re: Bloodspots
Joachim Dippold Offline
Lord of the Fowl

Registered: 02/28/06
Posts: 1823
Loc: Austria
Hello Uno,

yes, I remember;-) While reading all the stuff on the recent feed/salt-threads I think I have by accident read something about blood spots, too. I think itīs related with a lack of something, but canīt remember more since it doesnīt bother me, sorry.

Also I agree with Foehn and think itīs genetic to some point. Just an idea: do you remember when you FIRST got blood spots in your eggs? I mean, they werenīt there from your first hen, were they? So maybe you "introduced" them with a new breeder bird some years ago?

Just for the records: yes, we also have blood spots sometimes, say 2 or 3 per year. But since they are SO seldom I didnīt track the eggs.

As for your set eggs: Iīm sure you know this link already, but maybe reading it again lights a bulb? Hope this fits:

Quote:
Sign: Dead embryos; 7 to 17 days of incubation; each embryo has egg tooth, toenails, feather follicles (8 days), feathers (11 days). Causes:

Improper incubator temperature, humidity, turning, ventilation. Low humidity increases abnormalities of aortic arches (13 days).

Contamination.

Nutritional deficiencies -- riboflavin, vitamin B12, biotin, niacin, pyridoxine, pantothenic acid, phosphorus, boron, or linoleic acid.

Lethal genes (>30 have been described).
source: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/BODY_AA204

Oh, another thing, you say:

Quote:
These birds live in heated comfort
Have you tried cooping them unheated and see if thereīs a difference? Just an idea...

Good Luck and best greetings,

Joachim

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#9695 - 11/23/07 01:42 PM Re: Bloodspots
Wyattdogster Offline
Coop Keeper

Registered: 09/22/05
Posts: 493
Loc: Virginia
Uno, have you tried hanging lace curtains on the coop windows?? laugh You are so funny....I love your posts!

I checked the Chicken Health Handbook and it only gave two mentions of blood spots...could be due to a Vitamin A deficiency or cholera.

Hmmmmm, pureed carrots on the menu?

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#9696 - 11/23/07 04:25 PM Re: Bloodspots
Jocelyn Offline
Lord of the Fowl

Registered: 08/26/02
Posts: 1467
Loc: Canada
A couple things come to mind, and you may have to guess or try them all. Stale feed, either because the feedmill has a slow turnover or because you feed it out slow. If it's stale, the vitamin A and K will have broken down. Lack of those can make blood spots. Mouldy feed...toxins from moulds, or even eating too much alfalfa or sweetclover, toxins from plants can do this. So, clean out any mouldy corners, make sure they can't get too much alfalfa or sweetclover on pasture, make sure the feed doesn't have a lot of alfalfa pellets in it....and ask the feedmill how often they do a grist. ( make a batch of feed)

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#9697 - 11/23/07 07:13 PM Re: Bloodspots
Uno Offline
Lord of the Fowl

Registered: 08/26/05
Posts: 1280
Loc: Canada
Let's see, the feed is not around long enough to get moldy. Yes, I do breed my own replacements, a while back I was going to invent the SuperChicken ha ha ha. Perhaps it's time to out with the old and in with the new, but you get attached, you know how it is. If I were to turn off the heat I would have frozen eggs. Not good.

The only thing I have not tried is lace curtains, since I prefer a heavier drapery fabric myself. But it's a thought smile

Out of curiosity...I did not mean to use a cuss word in my topic line, I was quoting Shakespeare, if Shakespeare were a chicken guy. No slander intended. frown

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#9698 - 11/25/07 06:00 AM Re: Bloodspots
Hen Sense Offline
Coop Cleaner

Registered: 03/09/07
Posts: 208
Loc: Ohio
Yes, uno, I was picturing you as Chicken-Lady Macbeth wink

I'm thinking it's genetic. Just out of curiosity, what breed do you raise? You may have mentioned earlier, but I can't recall.

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#9699 - 11/26/07 02:20 PM Re: Bloodspots
Jrsygntbrdr1 Offline
Classroom Professor

Registered: 06/12/05
Posts: 2601
Loc: Arkansas
I was thinking the same thing about it being genetic...then again, they may be telling you to serve oats instead of pellets! smile Or maybe they have a hankering for Watermelon!

Then again...do you leave the eggs out on the counter for a few days before popping them in the fridge? If so, and a rooster is doing his job, then could it be the beginning of an embryo? If you don't leave them out...disregard this part and only pay attention to the Watermelon!

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#9700 - 11/29/07 09:12 PM Re: Bloodspots
Uno Offline
Lord of the Fowl

Registered: 08/26/05
Posts: 1280
Loc: Canada
Hello Hensense:

What kind of chickens do I raise? I think they're....mutts. Mostly AUstralorp with a bit of Brahma thrown in here and there. And a diverse few others not significant enough to mention. I get pretty poor egg production as they seem to molt every 11 days. I could go back to the production layers.

But at the risk of starting a broohaha I think those production layers are insane! I never had such violent feather picking as when I had those Isa Browns. I had to get rid of every single one and since then not a feather has been picked. I think the Brahma gene has created a very docile, laid back bird. Laid back, but not great lay...and yes I can say that on a poultry website and not be naughty eek

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#9701 - 11/30/07 12:31 AM Re: Bloodspots
Foehn Offline
Administrator
Lord of the Fowl

Registered: 08/08/06
Posts: 1968
Loc: New Zealand
I wonder if those Isa Browns you had, had an insatiable appetite for protein because they layed so well? Might have been the reason for feather picking. My experience with production birds is they tend to exhaust themselves in a few years and will simply drop dead, for no apparent reason. I don't like them for this reason. Much rather have a steady layer that will miss a day here and there but keep going for 8 or more years. You can't have a "relationship" with a bird that will snuff it when least expected.

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