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#96953 - 06/13/11 01:36 AM More from amateur
Joynatalie Offline
Feather

Registered: 05/31/11
Posts: 24
Loc: Brisbane, Australia
I was told I need to worm my girls. I have read a number of posts and am just confused about how, when, what type, and side effects. I am in Australia so if there any Aussies who can give me specific brand names,
While on a similar topic, what other "regular" maintenance should I do? Do they need regular vaccinations? Do i have to check their crop on a regular basis? Thank goodness for this forum I thought it was a tumor, Up until now i have only had dogs and cats so I have much to learn,

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#96958 - 06/13/11 02:46 AM Re: More from amateur [Re: Joynatalie]
Foehn Offline
Administrator
Lord of the Fowl

Registered: 08/08/06
Posts: 1968
Loc: New Zealand
Before you sail in with a wormer, it is advisable to get a faecal float done at your local vet to establish whether or not your hens actually have worms.
Your vet will then be able to recommend a suitable wormer for the type of worms supposing they have some.
I know there is a piperazine based wormer in Australia and probably Ivomec too. The piperazine may be available at pet stores, farm stores like RD1 and of course the vets. Ivomec comes in huge packs for farm use, but if your vet thinks it's appropriate, he will decant some for you since you only need a little. Make sure you follow the instructions on the pack of whatever you get (if you need it) Some wormers require you to with-hold using the eggs from 14-21 days.

Because my hens free range and can get into compost, snails and other creepy crawlies, some of which are hosts to worms, I worm my hens 2x a year, usually when they are either clucky and not laying, or when they moult in the autumn.

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#96959 - 06/13/11 03:52 AM Re: More from amateur [Re: Foehn]
Joynatalie Offline
Feather

Registered: 05/31/11
Posts: 24
Loc: Brisbane, Australia
I thought this needed to be done regardless, when I bought her I was told she will need worming in a couple of weeks. Mine also free range and love the compost and snails, do you think i should worm as a precaution? I just lost one girl and am really scared to lose another. I think if it was up to me they would be inside chickens!!!

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#96972 - 06/13/11 02:09 PM Re: More from amateur [Re: Joynatalie]
CJR Online   content
Coop Master

Registered: 07/16/02
Posts: 8490
Loc: Montana
Wormers are poisons, to be administered with care. I would never worm my birds without knowing that it was necessary! Most wild animals carry their own specific worms without harm. Only when "overloaded", either by fecal count, visual in the poop-or the condition of the bird is suspect, thin, unthrifty but not with mites or other symptoms noticeable, would I ever worm a chicken. Free range in some geographic areas may be cause for regular (2x a year as Foehn does her birds), would I worry about it. Need to KNOW before administering drugs of any kind. Be safe. CJR

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#96978 - 06/14/11 01:32 AM Re: More from amateur [Re: CJR]
Redcap Offline
Ruler of the Roost

Registered: 08/14/06
Posts: 954
Loc: Germany
Flubendazole is a panacea without known side effects ... and discovered now by the cancer medicine ...
http://bloodjournal.hematologylibrary.org/content/115/23/4824.abstract (Full text on request)

And therefore it would be interesting to know, whether it protects against Marek-associated tumours, too?
_________________________

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#97236 - 06/25/11 02:52 AM Re: More from amateur [Re: Foehn]
Joynatalie Offline
Feather

Registered: 05/31/11
Posts: 24
Loc: Brisbane, Australia
Still unsure whether to worm or not, I wen tot get feed today and asked about wormers. They showed me a bottle of liquid to add to their water for a few days. This seemed very dodgey as how would I monitor how much either girls had taken and if they spilt it? Collective ideas and wisdom shared would be appreciated,

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#97237 - 06/25/11 04:33 AM Re: More from amateur [Re: Joynatalie]
Foehn Offline
Administrator
Lord of the Fowl

Registered: 08/08/06
Posts: 1968
Loc: New Zealand
There is a wormer you add to water. You have to calculate the volume of water add the appropriate amount of wormer and make sure that is their only source of water to drink. It's the best way to do larger amounts of chickens since it doesn't stress them like catching them individually does.

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#97238 - 06/25/11 08:23 AM Re: More from amateur [Re: Foehn]
CJR Online   content
Coop Master

Registered: 07/16/02
Posts: 8490
Loc: Montana
If in doubt, I would not worm. The need to know is first. Then, not to worry. CJR

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#97240 - 06/25/11 11:14 AM Re: More from amateur [Re: CJR]
Redcap Offline
Ruler of the Roost

Registered: 08/14/06
Posts: 954
Loc: Germany
You are kidding ... You advise something which push 'em even more in doubt ... before she waste the money for the faeces test ... she makes nothing ... that's simple psychology!
A Antihelmintic drug like flubendazole treats against worms and more important it protect by this way against Histomoniasis (Black head disease) and as it has shown in protects probably against tumours. So where is the problem to prevent diseases??
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#97241 - 06/25/11 01:39 PM Re: More from amateur [Re: Redcap]
Foehn Offline
Administrator
Lord of the Fowl

Registered: 08/08/06
Posts: 1968
Loc: New Zealand
Redcap, I am fairly sure that in England and Australia, it is pretty much the same as NZ and some animal remedies cannot be bought as over-the-counter drugs as they can be in USA for instance. Therefore, to get wormers in Australia, it is important to first do a faecal float. If there are no or very few worms, then there is no point in shoving poisons into the hens just to say "I have wormed them" Regional differences in parasites and diseases are also very different. NZ for instance does not have any Newcastle's, nor many of the flu type virus' simply because of isolation and very very strict importation rules, so treatment for some of these things, we do not need to do. Prevention for some diseases doesn't enter the equation at all if they don't exist. That's partly the reason i suggested to Joynatalie to consult with her vet. He will be best able to advise on what to treat for if it's necessary.

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#97244 - 06/25/11 03:29 PM Re: More from amateur [Re: Foehn]
Redcap Offline
Ruler of the Roost

Registered: 08/14/06
Posts: 954
Loc: Germany
I have to go to the vet to get it, too. But there is no need to proof worm investation in advance. And the Flubenol jar holds for several years ;-) I would get poor if I would go every several weeks to him, to get his permisson pro forma - and each faeces test costs a multiple of the deworming.
I would doubt, that each vet has knowlegde about poultry. In my case, I have to say the most time, what it has do be done. And my vet trust my knowlegde. ;-))

http://www.crowshall.co.uk/forms/flubenvet-brochure.pdf
_________________________

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#97257 - 06/26/11 05:07 AM Re: More from amateur [Re: Redcap]
Wieslaw Offline
Moderator
Classroom Professor

Registered: 09/18/09
Posts: 3770
Loc: Denmark
Originally Posted By: Redcap
In my case, I have to say the most time, what it has do be done.


In my case too.

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#97680 - 07/14/11 02:14 AM Re: More from amateur [Re: Foehn]
Welshman Offline
Feather

Registered: 01/10/11
Posts: 38
Loc: Wales UK
In over 50 years of keeping poultry I have never wormed once and any bird that dies or I take to the table I gut and check and have never found any signs of worms.
A lot has been written about giving wormers if a bird looks saggy or ill and that I should imagine is the last thing an ill bird needs.
All my birds from day old through life are on Cider Apple vinegar and it works for me and my birds.

Keepers are bombarded with rubbish about suppliments and tonics to keep their birds alive and well.All these magic potions will not replace good stock management and Dr Green.

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